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  • FIRST POST
    • solentsusie
    • By solentsusie 8th Jan 18, 8:14 PM
    • 552Posts
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    solentsusie
    How do I find the landlord of the property next door
    • #1
    • 8th Jan 18, 8:14 PM
    How do I find the landlord of the property next door 8th Jan 18 at 8:14 PM
    Hello everyone

    I am trying to obtain the contact details for the landlord of the property next to mine which has been rented out since it was purchased in December 2015.

    The current tenants are a nightmare. I have obtained the property Title number from the land registry which states the names of the owners, which are registered at the address of the rented property with no other contact details or address details present, and that the lender is the NatWest bank.

    Any ideas on how I can obtain the actual contact details of the owners of the property who have never lived there but reside somewhere else?

    Any help appreciated.
Page 1
    • Alter ego
    • By Alter ego 8th Jan 18, 8:18 PM
    • 2,224 Posts
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    Alter ego
    • #2
    • 8th Jan 18, 8:18 PM
    • #2
    • 8th Jan 18, 8:18 PM
    Try writing a letter addressed to name and address as on Land reg. Hope the tenants pass it on.
    Ignore me if you like, it's not the real me anyway.
    • solentsusie
    • By solentsusie 8th Jan 18, 8:28 PM
    • 552 Posts
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    solentsusie
    • #3
    • 8th Jan 18, 8:28 PM
    • #3
    • 8th Jan 18, 8:28 PM
    I would be very surprised if the tenants pass anything on.

    If a property is purchased as a rental property surely there must be a way of finding out who actually owns it and where they can be contacted?
    • Dorian1958
    • By Dorian1958 8th Jan 18, 8:32 PM
    • 119 Posts
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    Dorian1958
    • #4
    • 8th Jan 18, 8:32 PM
    • #4
    • 8th Jan 18, 8:32 PM
    Here are some thoughts.


    I am presuming all your attempts to address your issues with your neighbours have not proved fruitful and any further attempt at resolving your problems on a common sense face to face basis is pointless. What is the problem, noise, antisocial behaviour? Depending upon the nature of the issues of your grievance the council environmental health department may be able to assist.


    In Scotland, all landlords have to be registered with the local authority, so if you are living in that enlightened country, check with the council and provide the address/postcode of the property. Failing that, you could write to the owners at the property address - they might have mail redirection in place. Do you know if there is a managing agent, do you remember it being advertised to let back in December 2015? If so, contact them. Sorry if this is a bit obvious.
    • Slithery
    • By Slithery 8th Jan 18, 8:33 PM
    • 521 Posts
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    Slithery
    • #5
    • 8th Jan 18, 8:33 PM
    • #5
    • 8th Jan 18, 8:33 PM
    The current tenants are a nightmare.
    Originally posted by solentsusie
    What are you expecting the landlord to do about this?
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 8th Jan 18, 8:41 PM
    • 6,547 Posts
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    davidmcn
    • #6
    • 8th Jan 18, 8:41 PM
    • #6
    • 8th Jan 18, 8:41 PM
    Tracing agents?
    • HampshireH
    • By HampshireH 8th Jan 18, 8:43 PM
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    HampshireH
    • #7
    • 8th Jan 18, 8:43 PM
    • #7
    • 8th Jan 18, 8:43 PM
    You could use a search engine to see who the property was advertised through (agent wise) if it was.

    If you find this you may be able to establish whether they manage it on behalf of the LL and therefore you could start there?
    • solentsusie
    • By solentsusie 8th Jan 18, 8:57 PM
    • 552 Posts
    • 370 Thanks
    solentsusie
    • #8
    • 8th Jan 18, 8:57 PM
    • #8
    • 8th Jan 18, 8:57 PM
    What are you expecting the landlord to do about this?
    Originally posted by Slithery
    I would personally like to make them aware of the problems, they are capable of issuing a Section 21 notice if they decide they want to remove these tenants. The police and environmental health are aware of the issues.

    Please don't bother responding if you have nothing valid or constructive to put forward. Thanks.
    • dh058977
    • By dh058977 8th Jan 18, 8:58 PM
    • 11 Posts
    • 7 Thanks
    dh058977
    • #9
    • 8th Jan 18, 8:58 PM
    • #9
    • 8th Jan 18, 8:58 PM
    Is there a 'property history' button on Zoopla house prices? If so, that would tell you who it was marketed by previously. I'd start from there
    • solentsusie
    • By solentsusie 8th Jan 18, 9:01 PM
    • 552 Posts
    • 370 Thanks
    solentsusie
    You could use a search engine to see who the property was advertised through (agent wise) if it was.

    If you find this you may be able to establish whether they manage it on behalf of the LL and therefore you could start there?
    Originally posted by HampshireH
    I don't think it is managed but I do know the name of the estate agent that sold the property, I doubt they will share the contact details with me due to data protection but there is no harm in asking.
    • anselld
    • By anselld 8th Jan 18, 9:13 PM
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    anselld
    The police and environmental health are aware of the issues.
    Originally posted by solentsusie
    Then assuming we are talking criminal and/or antisocial behaviour they are the best people to deal with the issues.
    • theartfullodger
    • By theartfullodger 8th Jan 18, 9:14 PM
    • 9,247 Posts
    • 12,266 Thanks
    theartfullodger
    You do not have to own a property to be landlord (but unlikely).

    That the owner has left the address as the property means two probably things
    -a) He's got the wrong sort of mortgage, not buy-2-let - possible he's also fiddling other things (eg tax)
    -b) He's stupid: A bad person/tenant could set up fake ID, then sell or re-mortgage the place: (where's all the mail going to go eh?)

    You have a neighbour dispute: Treat it exactly as you would if next door owned the place, follow Citizens advice neighbour dispute process..

    It is of course, dear reader, possible next door thinks OP is a nightmare...
    • G_M
    • By G_M 8th Jan 18, 11:26 PM
    • 42,811 Posts
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    G_M
    Try writing a letter addressed to name and address as on Land reg. Hope the tenants pass it on.
    I would be very surprised if the tenants pass anything on.

    If a property is purchased as a rental property surely there must be a way of finding out who actually owns it and where they can be contacted?
    Originally posted by solentsusie
    There's a better than even chance that the lanlord has arranged for forwarding of his mail by Royal Mail.

    But in case not, and in case the tenants open the letter themselves, word it diplomatically........

    Did you ever see a letting agents sign when the property was first bought? Approach the agents.
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 9th Jan 18, 12:21 AM
    • 6,547 Posts
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    davidmcn
    There's a better than even chance that the lanlord has arranged for forwarding of his mail by Royal Mail.
    Originally posted by G_M
    Seems unlikely it was ever forwarded if landlords have never lived there - besides, longest you can forward is 2 years i think, so would have expired by now.
    • HampshireH
    • By HampshireH 9th Jan 18, 6:29 AM
    • 371 Posts
    • 385 Thanks
    HampshireH
    The estate agent who sold it won't pass their details on to you but you could apple to their better nature and see if they could pass on your letter
    • solentsusie
    • By solentsusie 9th Jan 18, 9:26 AM
    • 552 Posts
    • 370 Thanks
    solentsusie
    You do not have to own a property to be landlord (but unlikely).

    That the owner has left the address as the property means two probably things
    -a) He's got the wrong sort of mortgage, not buy-2-let - possible he's also fiddling other things (eg tax)
    -b) He's stupid: A bad person/tenant could set up fake ID, then sell or re-mortgage the place: (where's all the mail going to go eh?)

    You have a neighbour dispute: Treat it exactly as you would if next door owned the place, follow Citizens advice neighbour dispute process..

    It is of course, dear reader, possible next door thinks OP is a nightmare...
    Originally posted by theartfullodger
    The owner has NEVER lived at the address, since it was purchased in December 2015 it has been rented, first to prostitutes who were only there a few months and left after being reported by other parties to the police. Environmental Heath were involved due to about 100 black bin bags of rubbish being left in the back garden of the property causing a rat problem. The property was then empty for a couple of months and has now been rented again. No rental agent board was erected so I presume the new tenants were found by other means.

    There are the names of two people on the Property Title, a man and a woman, and the NatWest bank is listed as the lender for the mortgage. I suspect then that they don't have a buy-to-let mortgage. It sounds like the owners are probably avoiding something.

    I am going to ignore your final comment as it is childish and put there to cause an argument. Grow up.
    • vacheron
    • By vacheron 9th Jan 18, 9:39 AM
    • 759 Posts
    • 668 Thanks
    vacheron
    If the tenants are currently unaware of your issues with them, why not knock on the door and tell them you are thinking of erecting a new boundary fence and you will need their landlords permission to take down the old one and for possible temporary access to their land.

    If they don't know the landlord you could tell them you would be happy to contact their letting agency for them to save them the trouble.
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    • Comms69
    • By Comms69 9th Jan 18, 9:44 AM
    • 1,798 Posts
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    Comms69
    I would be very surprised if the tenants pass anything on.

    If a property is purchased as a rental property surely there must be a way of finding out who actually owns it and where they can be contacted?
    Originally posted by solentsusie


    Why?


    The landlord does not have to listen to you and your complaints.


    If the tenants are committing offences, report them. If not, then nothing you can do.


    Some LLs might act, but there's no obligation to
    • need an answer
    • By need an answer 9th Jan 18, 9:55 AM
    • 114 Posts
    • 115 Thanks
    need an answer
    OP I think you need to treat these tenants in the same way as you would deal with a homeowner next door in as much as you must take the civil and legal route of reporting to environmental health,maybe crimestoppers or any other relevant council departments.

    The fact that the owner of the house has chosen to rent it out does not automatically follow that they are responsible for the tenants they choose to rent to.
    All I can say in cold comfort to you is that the average tenancy is usually shorter than the average period a home owner owns so hopefully your tenants wont be there in years to come.
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    • martindow
    • By martindow 9th Jan 18, 9:57 AM
    • 7,353 Posts
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    martindow
    I suppose you could put the cat amongst the pigeons by writing an innocent letter to the mortgage company asking them to forward a letter to the landlord as you have concerns about their tenants ...
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