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  • FIRST POST
    • Simba-ali34
    • By Simba-ali34 8th Jan 18, 12:01 AM
    • 158Posts
    • 7Thanks
    Simba-ali34
    Floor deflection
    • #1
    • 8th Jan 18, 12:01 AM
    Floor deflection 8th Jan 18 at 12:01 AM
    Hello,

    So I recently purchased a new build and found one of the bedrooms floor wasn't quite right. Items of furniture would rattle slightly and it sounded quite loud when walking across.

    In the lounge underneath you could hear crackling noises when someone walks across and it's quite thumpy. Someone mentioned deflection of the floor joists and maybe the builder made an error. If you can feel the deflection is that acceptable?

    I had the builder do an inspection of the floor which they seen to think was acceptable and the plans met minimum standards.

    Just curious to think what you guys would do from this point? Do I accept what they are saying or get nhbc involved? Overall I haven't had many problems, it's mostly been the floors.

    Regards
Page 1
    • Furts
    • By Furts 8th Jan 18, 7:32 AM
    • 3,749 Posts
    • 2,366 Thanks
    Furts
    • #2
    • 8th Jan 18, 7:32 AM
    • #2
    • 8th Jan 18, 7:32 AM
    Check your warranty terms but a typical way forward would be .. notify in writing to builders head office, request ceilings are removed in the lounge and joist bearings are investigated and the creaking repaired. Request you be present and you will be taking photos of what is found and what is done.

    Expect some resistance - all this incurs some expense. Then if things do not tick along smoothly the next stage is NHBC.

    But also be firm and decisive over all this. The typical scenario is any signs of weakness, or caution, and the builder and NHBC will walk all over you
    • Simba-ali34
    • By Simba-ali34 8th Jan 18, 7:56 AM
    • 158 Posts
    • 7 Thanks
    Simba-ali34
    • #3
    • 8th Jan 18, 7:56 AM
    • #3
    • 8th Jan 18, 7:56 AM
    Thanks for the reply.

    My problem is it's hard to argue with the builder when they are the expert.

    I was going to see if I could get a surveyor to have a look if possible so I atleast have some expert opinion backing me up. Would this help at all?
    • Simba-ali34
    • By Simba-ali34 8th Jan 18, 7:58 AM
    • 158 Posts
    • 7 Thanks
    Simba-ali34
    • #4
    • 8th Jan 18, 7:58 AM
    • #4
    • 8th Jan 18, 7:58 AM
    Also it's a shared ownership property so all my dealing go through a housing association if that makes any difference
    • marlot
    • By marlot 8th Jan 18, 8:00 AM
    • 3,208 Posts
    • 2,335 Thanks
    marlot
    • #5
    • 8th Jan 18, 8:00 AM
    • #5
    • 8th Jan 18, 8:00 AM
    The cracking sounds come from modern plasterboard, which has a lot of recycled content and makes noises when it flexes.

    Most new build uses I beams for joists - you do tend to get a bit of flexing, alas.
    • Furts
    • By Furts 8th Jan 18, 8:00 AM
    • 3,749 Posts
    • 2,366 Thanks
    Furts
    • #6
    • 8th Jan 18, 8:00 AM
    • #6
    • 8th Jan 18, 8:00 AM
    Expert help will assist, but it comes with a price. Also if you do this, get the expert to look over your home for obvious(to them) defects so these can be seen at the same time. That means get the expert on board before going too far with the builder.

    What part of the country is your home?
    • Simba-ali34
    • By Simba-ali34 8th Jan 18, 10:09 AM
    • 158 Posts
    • 7 Thanks
    Simba-ali34
    • #7
    • 8th Jan 18, 10:09 AM
    • #7
    • 8th Jan 18, 10:09 AM
    I understand newbuilds are normally considered badly built compared to older properties, does that mean levels of floor bounce/deflection are also more relaxed?

    My biggest concern if I'm honest is whether this would effect selling the property in the future. The builders obviously tells me it's within spec. Hmm maybe a survey is the way to go.
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