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  • FIRST POST
    • realslyshady
    • By realslyshady 7th Jan 18, 4:54 PM
    • 7Posts
    • 1Thanks
    realslyshady
    Advice on underfloor heating
    • #1
    • 7th Jan 18, 4:54 PM
    Advice on underfloor heating 7th Jan 18 at 4:54 PM
    Hi all! Just joined after browsing the forums and not quite finding what I'm after.

    I'm currently buying a large Victorian semi-detached house that needs mountains of work doing to it. I've renovated old properties before, but this is different — it needs the works. Half the ground floor is damp and needs to get to ripped out, and we want to open the two ground floor rooms into an open plan living area. My builder plans to damp proof by tanking the walls, and has suggested taking up the entire suspended timber floor and replacing with a solid floor, along with underfloor heating. I'm pretty keen on the idea, but I can't find out some of the things I'd like to know. Can anyone help, or point me in the right direction? For info, there has been historical movement in the property, but it seems to be settled now.

    1. Do I need planning permission for replacing the floor?
    2. Do I need a plans from a structural engineer etc.?
    3. Are there any potential issues with the neighbouring property, Party Wall Act etc?
    4. If underfloor heating isn't an option in the upper floors, is it ridiculously expensive to run two systems from one boiler? I.e. one for the UFH, one for the radiators.

    Sorry if I seem like a jumbly — would appreciate any advice from people who know about these things and have installed UFH or replaced suspended timber with solid flooring.

    Thanks!
Page 1
    • aneary
    • By aneary 7th Jan 18, 5:01 PM
    • 866 Posts
    • 792 Thanks
    aneary
    • #2
    • 7th Jan 18, 5:01 PM
    • #2
    • 7th Jan 18, 5:01 PM
    My parents have underfloor heating in their house it’s amazing but they don’t have it upstairs. They only put the radiators in upstairs last year as they plan on selling it and can’t without the radiators. They haven’t needed them in 8 years and have only switched them on to see if they work.
    Ensure upstairs is well insulated and you may not need to use the upstairs heating.
    Only not of caution in the winter underfloor heating is great however late autumn and early spring it can be a bit of a pain it takes two hours to kick in and the same to cool down so you can be cold or too hot if you dont get the timing right.
    • NeilCr
    • By NeilCr 7th Jan 18, 5:16 PM
    • 1,160 Posts
    • 1,312 Thanks
    NeilCr
    • #3
    • 7th Jan 18, 5:16 PM
    • #3
    • 7th Jan 18, 5:16 PM


    Only not of caution in the winter underfloor heating is great however late autumn and early spring it can be a bit of a pain it takes two hours to kick in and the same to cool down so you can be cold or too hot if you dont get the timing right.
    Originally posted by aneary
    Absolutely this. I have it downstairs and it is good. But regulating it is a work of art. I tried leaving it on all through the winter last year and it was lovely but slowly upstairs got warmer and warmer. And I like a cold bedroom. So there is a bit of turning it off and on.

    On the other side of the discussion my cat loves it!
    Last edited by NeilCr; 07-01-2018 at 5:16 PM. Reason: Spelling
    • realslyshady
    • By realslyshady 7th Jan 18, 5:23 PM
    • 7 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    realslyshady
    • #4
    • 7th Jan 18, 5:23 PM
    • #4
    • 7th Jan 18, 5:23 PM
    Thanks NeilCr and aneary! I'm pretty sold on the idea of the underfloor heating, but definitely anxious about the installation...
    • blackshirtuk
    • By blackshirtuk 7th Jan 18, 5:54 PM
    • 511 Posts
    • 288 Thanks
    blackshirtuk
    • #5
    • 7th Jan 18, 5:54 PM
    • #5
    • 7th Jan 18, 5:54 PM
    Cannot answer comprehensibly for 1,2,3 but wouldn't think you would need planning unless listed?

    4
    Our ground floor is part underfloor heated. All heating runs from 1 boiler with 3 zones
    1 zone for hotwater
    1 zone for radiators
    1 zone for underfloor heating.

    All controlled by a 3 way programmer and with both heating zones having their own thermostat.
    The only extra expense is the extra zone valve and a 3 way programmer (as ours was 2 it needed changing)
    You can control when each zone comes on so our ufh comes on a bit earlier than the radiators as it does take longer to warm up, but aso goes off earlier too.
    • Tom99
    • By Tom99 7th Jan 18, 6:34 PM
    • 988 Posts
    • 606 Thanks
    Tom99
    • #6
    • 7th Jan 18, 6:34 PM
    • #6
    • 7th Jan 18, 6:34 PM
    The fact your builder is going to tank ground floor walls would worry me.
    • Slithery
    • By Slithery 7th Jan 18, 7:04 PM
    • 482 Posts
    • 738 Thanks
    Slithery
    • #7
    • 7th Jan 18, 7:04 PM
    • #7
    • 7th Jan 18, 7:04 PM
    That's exactly what I was thinking....
    • daveyjp
    • By daveyjp 7th Jan 18, 7:14 PM
    • 7,266 Posts
    • 5,669 Thanks
    daveyjp
    • #8
    • 7th Jan 18, 7:14 PM
    • #8
    • 7th Jan 18, 7:14 PM
    My parents did this in their bungalow, so no upstairs to worry about. They were also fortunate that the under floor void was just the right depth and it was a convenient place to reuse a lot of bricks they had to build up the solid floor.

    It was a fantastic decision. No radiators givimg flexibility where furniture can go, individually heated rooms and once up to temperature the floor keeps warm for days.
    • creditscoremeansnothing
    • By creditscoremeansnothing 7th Jan 18, 7:16 PM
    • 30 Posts
    • 17 Thanks
    creditscoremeansnothing
    • #9
    • 7th Jan 18, 7:16 PM
    • #9
    • 7th Jan 18, 7:16 PM
    Me 3 about the tanking, be careful op as this just usually hides the problem.
    • camptownraces
    • By camptownraces 7th Jan 18, 7:32 PM
    • 315 Posts
    • 190 Thanks
    camptownraces
    Hope your builder can point you to successful projects which he has done nearby, so you can go and see the installations and talk to his clients.

    A relative moved into a victorian terraced house with UFH in the kitchen, installed in 2010. Under a floor covered with tiles about 18" square. Looked lovely.

    Within 2 weeks of moving in, the gas main under the floor had fractured, and so had the water main.

    Don't these projects require building control approval?
    • realslyshady
    • By realslyshady 7th Jan 18, 7:34 PM
    • 7 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    realslyshady
    Thanks for the advice, folks!

    Might be doing my builder a disservice — he suggested tanking as an option when I was set on repairing the suspended floor. Have since come round to his first suggestion that we build up void with hardcore/insulation/UFH/screed. I'll look into the tanking — we know there's a damp problem, and I'm hoping the opportunity to put in a new floor is also a chance to put it right. Advice on this also welcome!

    Any thoughts on points 1, 2 & 3?
    • realslyshady
    • By realslyshady 7th Jan 18, 7:36 PM
    • 7 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    realslyshady
    Thanks camptownraces — that's basically what I'm trying to find out here! Really keen to make sure we do this right and get a longterm replacement for the current rotten floor.
    • Tom99
    • By Tom99 8th Jan 18, 7:41 AM
    • 988 Posts
    • 606 Thanks
    Tom99
    Thanks for the advice, folks!

    Might be doing my builder a disservice — he suggested tanking as an option when I was set on repairing the suspended floor. Have since come round to his first suggestion that we build up void with hardcore/insulation/UFH/screed. I'll look into the tanking — we know there's a damp problem, and I'm hoping the opportunity to put in a new floor is also a chance to put it right. Advice on this also welcome!

    Any thoughts on points 1, 2 & 3?
    Originally posted by realslyshady
    Where is the damp? When you mentioned tanking I assumed it was the walls. Replacing the floor will not cure any damp in the walls. Tanking is usually confined to basements and wet rooms.
    • realslyshady
    • By realslyshady 8th Jan 18, 11:58 AM
    • 7 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    realslyshady
    Hi Tom99 — the damp is in the floor and walls at one particular corner where a downspout has been misaligned for what seems to be about 30 years or so. A concrete yard outside doesn't seem to be helping much. There's terrible decay in the room, with damp spreading across the timbers and two corner walls. The plaster is a paste, the window timbers shot, the floorboards and joists riddled.
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