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    • jamesl1989
    • By jamesl1989 7th Jan 18, 11:13 AM
    • 7Posts
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    jamesl1989
    New build soundproofing regs
    • #1
    • 7th Jan 18, 11:13 AM
    New build soundproofing regs 7th Jan 18 at 11:13 AM
    I moved into a new build a few months ago. General quality has been fine (few snagging bits, but otherwise nothing major), but the soundproofing is very poor. In particular, we can hear water going through pipes when toilets are flushed above us - is this in line with the building regs?!
Page 1
    • JoJo1978
    • By JoJo1978 7th Jan 18, 11:17 AM
    • 224 Posts
    • 230 Thanks
    JoJo1978
    • #2
    • 7th Jan 18, 11:17 AM
    • #2
    • 7th Jan 18, 11:17 AM
    Flat? I live in a house, my husband is in the shower right now and I can hear the water. I can also hear if he flushes the loo. This is a wind up, right?!

    Soundproofing in newer houses is poor, but regardless of house age you'd expect to hear water in pipes
    Hamster in the wheel (London) 1999-2017
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    • jamesl1989
    • By jamesl1989 7th Jan 18, 11:20 AM
    • 7 Posts
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    jamesl1989
    • #3
    • 7th Jan 18, 11:20 AM
    • #3
    • 7th Jan 18, 11:20 AM
    But this is sound from the pipes of a different flat, not the same flat - I would have thought the pipes would have been insulated in what are essentially exterior walls?
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 7th Jan 18, 11:32 AM
    • 6,492 Posts
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    davidmcn
    • #4
    • 7th Jan 18, 11:32 AM
    • #4
    • 7th Jan 18, 11:32 AM
    Count your blessings. I used to live in a flat where you could hear what the upstairs neighbour was putting into the pan, never mind what was coming out...

    Not sure what exactly current regulations require, but I think it's fairly commonplace - AFAIK the drain pipes don't require to be behind anything more substantial than a sheet of plasterboard.
    • googler
    • By googler 7th Jan 18, 2:09 PM
    • 14,531 Posts
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    googler
    • #5
    • 7th Jan 18, 2:09 PM
    • #5
    • 7th Jan 18, 2:09 PM
    But this is sound from the pipes of a different flat, not the same flat - I would have thought the pipes would have been insulated in what are essentially exterior walls?
    Originally posted by jamesl1989
    Even blocks of flats these days are built on timber frames with external "architectural brick" (looks like brick, but has no load-bearing value, it's just for decor).

    All that's between you and the pipes is woodwork and plasterboard, I'm afraid.....

    All I can recommend, if your purchase was a genuine new build (i.e. you bought it off the developer) is to look at the planning application on the local council's website, and inspect the various floorplans for clues as to the plumbing arrangments. It might be possible to see if things are routed next to other flats, or taken through stairwells and common areas.
    • ruperts
    • By ruperts 7th Jan 18, 2:44 PM
    • 701 Posts
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    ruperts
    • #6
    • 7th Jan 18, 2:44 PM
    • #6
    • 7th Jan 18, 2:44 PM
    https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/resistance-to-sound-approved-document-e

    I did a quick word search for ‘pipe’ and it looks like they should be surrounded by at least 25mm of sound insulating material such as mineral wool.
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