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  • FIRST POST
    • Esthermate
    • By Esthermate 7th Jan 18, 9:14 AM
    • 9Posts
    • 87Thanks
    Esthermate
    Plumbing in a washing machine
    • #1
    • 7th Jan 18, 9:14 AM
    Plumbing in a washing machine 7th Jan 18 at 9:14 AM
    Hello. I am new here. I have a washing machine in my sitting room, functioning as a rather convenient table. Ideally I would prefer to use it to wash clothes.

    Someone was meant to be plumbing it in before Christmas but is too busy.

    My question is: can I do this myself, or is there any risk of me causing trouble?

    Tia!
Page 1
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 7th Jan 18, 9:47 AM
    • 6,522 Posts
    • 5,306 Thanks
    Norman Castle
    • #2
    • 7th Jan 18, 9:47 AM
    • #2
    • 7th Jan 18, 9:47 AM
    Depending on your pipework you should be able to fit this yourself.
    Lots of youtube videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3VTcparea2Y Watch as many as you can.

    Can you find the water outlet connection, the waste water pipe outlet and the mains plug socket?
    Don't harass a hippie. You'll get bad karma.
    • Alfrescodave
    • By Alfrescodave 7th Jan 18, 10:49 AM
    • 533 Posts
    • 278 Thanks
    Alfrescodave
    • #3
    • 7th Jan 18, 10:49 AM
    • #3
    • 7th Jan 18, 10:49 AM
    Is it a replacement for a broken one ? if so just pull out the old one and make a note of the fixtures and fittings and follow youtube videos as mentioned previously.
    Any replacement pipes etc are readily available from toolstation/ screwfix etc. Give it a go, you might surprise yourself
    • Naf
    • By Naf 7th Jan 18, 11:18 AM
    • 2,987 Posts
    • 2,218 Thanks
    Naf
    • #4
    • 7th Jan 18, 11:18 AM
    • #4
    • 7th Jan 18, 11:18 AM
    Its pretty straightforward, there's just two pipes to connect and away you go, basically.

    There is, of course, some risk of not getting the fittings quite right; but I make sure to sit around for a bit, then continue checking regularly to make sure there's no leaks.
    Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience.
    - Mark Twain
    Arguing with idiots is like playing chess with a pigeon: no matter how good you are at chess, its just going to knock over the pieces and strut around like its victorious.
    • keithdc
    • By keithdc 7th Jan 18, 11:40 AM
    • 254 Posts
    • 496 Thanks
    keithdc
    • #5
    • 7th Jan 18, 11:40 AM
    • #5
    • 7th Jan 18, 11:40 AM
    Don't forget to remove the transport bolts!!!
    • Esthermate
    • By Esthermate 7th Jan 18, 12:17 PM
    • 9 Posts
    • 87 Thanks
    Esthermate
    • #6
    • 7th Jan 18, 12:17 PM
    • #6
    • 7th Jan 18, 12:17 PM
    Thank you all

    As long as there is no danger, I will give it ago this week when I have some morale support.

    I did watch one video which confused me with hot and cold water. (it was American).

    Am I right that UK washing machines are cold water only.

    (The old machine is gone).

    Keith, removing and keeping safe the transport bolts is the one thing that I do know!
    • Naf
    • By Naf 7th Jan 18, 12:24 PM
    • 2,987 Posts
    • 2,218 Thanks
    Naf
    • #7
    • 7th Jan 18, 12:24 PM
    • #7
    • 7th Jan 18, 12:24 PM
    It depends on the machine. Check the manual, but I think that the vast majority of machines are either cold only or can take either.
    Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience.
    - Mark Twain
    Arguing with idiots is like playing chess with a pigeon: no matter how good you are at chess, its just going to knock over the pieces and strut around like its victorious.
    • cranford
    • By cranford 7th Jan 18, 1:48 PM
    • 134 Posts
    • 69 Thanks
    cranford
    • #8
    • 7th Jan 18, 1:48 PM
    • #8
    • 7th Jan 18, 1:48 PM
    For the last DIY plumbing I did , new kitchen taps and moving the tap/pipe to my washing machine I used JG speedfit fittings. You just push them on to the copper pipe and give them a twist. The beauty of this make is that you can remove them and use them again. Other makes are available but not all are reusable. Don't forget to put a stop valve or tap between the machine and the supply then at least you can turn your water back on without the machine being there.. To get a nice clean cut on copper pipe its a lot easier to use a pipe cutter and then just run round some emery paper. I used a "Rolson Rotary 15mm cutter" £4.99 on Ebay, you don't need to spend a fortune on it as it will only be used a few times, unless you get the taste for plumbing!

    JG washing machine valve https://www.screwfix.com/p/jg-speedfit-15aptp-washing-machine-tap-15mm-x/18908
    Or maybe you coiuld use an appliance tee joint https://www.homebase.co.uk/jg-speedfit-appliance-tee-15mm_p270579
    Last edited by cranford; 07-01-2018 at 2:53 PM.
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