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  • FIRST POST
    • glider3560
    • By glider3560 6th Jan 18, 5:59 PM
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    glider3560
    People who put non-recyclables in the recycling bin
    • #1
    • 6th Jan 18, 5:59 PM
    People who put non-recyclables in the recycling bin 6th Jan 18 at 5:59 PM
    Since moving into a block of flats with a communal bin store, I've been astonished at some of the stuff people put into the recycling bins.

    This week, I've seen the following:
    • Christmas tree decorations (tinsel, star, baubles), all in really good condition
    • Food waste inside a bag for life
    • Loose bags for life that aren't even damaged, presumably they don't understand the concept and there's a huge sign above the bin saying not to put plastic bags in the recycling
    • Polystyrene padding from boxes and other packaging stuff that isn't cardboard
    • Off-cuts from carpet and a coconut door mat
    • Glass, when there's a separate bin for glass
    • Half a McDonald's burger and some fries
    • Used nappies ()
    I know life's too short to worry, but it does annoy me that this contaminated rubbish causes more cost to the council (which we all have to pay for). Why can't these people just take a few moments to think before they throw. The normal waste bin is right next to the recycling, so it's not like there is any extra effort.

Page 2
    • Dr.Rock
    • By Dr.Rock 11th Jan 18, 12:12 PM
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    Dr.Rock
    The same people that don't recycle are probably the same ones that throw their litter away in the street. I remember talking to a guy once, he was just finishing eating a takaway and chucked it over his shoulder. I said ..... there's a bin there, 5yds away . His answer... It keeps someone in a job. picking it up.
    The people who don't bother to recycle properly have the same attitude ....... someone else will sort it all out. I'm not sure telling binmen not to empty contaminated bins, is the answer. All that happens then is these people start to use their neighbours bins.
    Originally posted by SamsReturn
    I remember walking down the street where I used to live behind a man and a young boy (presumably his son or someone he had responsibility for). The guy was drinking from a bottle of water and when he had almost finished just threw it over a fence into a garden.
    I thought, "poor lad, what chance does he have in life with role models like that?"
    • onlyroz
    • By onlyroz 11th Jan 18, 12:36 PM
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    onlyroz
    I am always astounded at the lack of ability to follow simple instructions regarding recycling in supposedly intelligent people. There is also a lot of can't-be-bothered-ness as well. I see it at work where people put their lunch packaging in the regular bin when it could easily be recycled.


    I think the only way to encourage more recycling is to introduce proper incentives (on individuals and businesses) to do it properly.
    • Pyxis
    • By Pyxis 11th Jan 18, 12:54 PM
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    Pyxis
    I am always astounded at the lack of ability to follow simple instructions regarding recycling in supposedly intelligent people. There is also a lot of can't-be-bothered-ness as well. I see it at work where people put their lunch packaging in the regular bin when it could easily be recycled.


    I think the only way to encourage more recycling is to introduce proper incentives (on individuals and businesses) to do it properly.
    Originally posted by onlyroz
    I think one of the problems is locating and reading the triangle which tells you what type of plastic it is.

    In my area, only types 1, 2 and 3 are accepted. Some plastic bottles and containers have a very visible mark, but a lot have to be searched for, and then some are small and it's difficult to make out the number in the triangle, or the letters underneath.

    Because that takes a bit of effort, a lot of people probably don't bother, and I often wonder how much of our area's plastic recycling is contaminated.

    Also, the caps of bottles are very frequently of a different, non-recyclable plastic, but I bet a lot of people don't even think to check the caps.



    One thing that annoys me is hotels. I think I have only come across one hotel that had separate, marked bins in the room for recyclables and non-recyclables.
    Even if they had one recyclable bin on each floor, by the lift, say, that would be something.
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    • AubreyMac
    • By AubreyMac 11th Jan 18, 1:24 PM
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    AubreyMac
    When I lived in my family house we had our own bins (general, recycling and a small food bin). As the house had 5 adults and a baby we found that fortnightly collection wasn't enough as the bins got full very quickly especially the recycling as most of our wastage was packaging mainly.


    I sometimes therefore put rubbish in any bin with space. The bin men do not collects bags outside of the bin and in my time there I've never seen them open the bags to check what's inside. Sometimes there have been foxes raiding bags left outside which was a nuisance.


    Now that I live alone in a flat I have my own bin but as they are placed in a communal area I do find that neighbours treat all bins as communal and there is always mixed rubbish in all bins.
    • Gettingtherequickly
    • By Gettingtherequickly 11th Jan 18, 4:42 PM
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    Gettingtherequickly
    I live in a block of flats with a single communal recycling bin for the 12 flats, all recycling goes into it. What gets on my goat is how quickly the bin fills, not an issue if being responsible recyclers, but generally it is because other residents can't be bothered to flatten as much as possible, why don't they realise that a flattened box takes up less space? It means that recyclable materials have to go in general waste as those bins are emptied weekly as against fortnightly for recycling.

    I was on holidays in Austria about 25 years ago and was speaking to some about recycling there. He found it very frustrating as the authorities were very pedantic about the correct bins being used and issued fines, but once the bins were collected, they were all emptied into the same collection truck.
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    • Pyxis
    • By Pyxis 13th Jan 18, 8:10 AM
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    Pyxis
    Now, this is the sort of thing that makes me hopping mad!


    Look at this bottle of shower cream...........

    See that it has an integral white top with a flip up blue lid.

    The top looks, to all extents and purposes, identical to the bottle.







    Well, I finished this bottle today, and looking underneath it, saw in the triangle that it was a 2, so acceptable by my recycling department.

    So I unscrewed the top, in order to rinse it out.

    Out of interest, I looked inside the top, and with very great difficulty, and only under a strong bright light at a certain angle, I saw that the top had a triangle with a 5 in it, and 5 is not accepted for recycling in my area.


    The top looks identical to the bottle, so anyone could be forgiven for thinking that the whole thing was recyclable, yet, the tops would probably contaminate the load.

    This makes me so cross, as it looks like the whole recycling effort is just a box-ticking exercise.


    Why can't the plastics number be in large contrasting print on the outside of the bottle, then if the top is a different type, it will be obvious?




    I've also noticed that the dark blue bottles of bleach may be of recyclable plastic or may not, even though they are very similar and the same colour. (I mean proprietary brand versus store's own brand).



    .
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    • ScarletMarble
    • By ScarletMarble 13th Jan 18, 10:14 AM
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    ScarletMarble
    I live in a property which uses a communal bin area with 9 other properties. Probably just 2, perhaps 3 of the tenants are contributing to the mess. Then the bin men don't collect it, making the bin area more messy. I give you some examples:
    .
    .One of them has a nappy wearing child. They fold up the used nappy using the sticky remains left and just chuck it in the bin area with no nappy sack and not in a bag of general rubbish. In the summer, the heat has caused the nappy to unfold to expose the contents and the smell! Nappy sacks can be as cheap as 25p for 100.

    . Our recycling sacks (have 2 types) 1 for paper/cardboard and the other for plastic and cans (including aerosols) are free and can pick them up from a few places in the council area. One tenant is taking the p!ss and using them as general rubbish sacks. As they are putting them in already overflowing bins, the binmen can remove them and put them back in the bin area. I have sometimes put these bags inside other bins with putting my bag of rubbish on top - to hide these bags.

    .Use bags for life as rubbish bags. They aren't ripped and look new. Obviously got more money than sense. Can't tie them up properly as the extreme sides are still open to the elements.

    . Putting bulky waste - broken chest of drawers, tv stands, microwaves, cot mattress - these were the last few things in the bin area. There is a tip a mile from here and most have a car. I went to the tip and it took me 20 mins to drive there, park at the tip and take my broken electrical items and a stool into the relevant skips and drive home.

    Tenants have been sent countless letters to them from the HA and still not adhering to the rules.
    • glider3560
    • By glider3560 13th Jan 18, 10:24 AM
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    glider3560
    . Our recycling sacks (have 2 types) 1 for paper/cardboard and the other for plastic and cans (including aerosols) are free and can pick them up from a few places in the council area. One tenant is taking the p!ss and using them as general rubbish sacks. As they are putting them in already overflowing bins, the binmen can remove them and put them back in the bin area. I have sometimes put these bags inside other bins with putting my bag of rubbish on top - to hide these bags.
    Originally posted by ScarletMarble
    I had these bags somewhere (think it was Hillingdon Council). They were actually a really good idea for recycling (the council would even deliver the bags for free when you ran out). But, like you, someone would always put them in the normal bin. We had those dumpster type bins and the council would refuse to take the whole bin (about 30 bags of rubbish) until these were removed. As you would expect, the bags then ended up overflowing.

    .Use bags for life as rubbish bags. They aren't ripped and look new. Obviously got more money than sense. Can't tie them up properly as the extreme sides are still open to the elements.
    Originally posted by ScarletMarble
    Same here. Sometimes loose with nothing inside. I'm tight enough that I recovered a couple of the clean looking empty bags and took them back to Tesco to get new replacements for myself to restore my bag collection

    • Ben84
    • By Ben84 13th Jan 18, 7:45 PM
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    Ben84
    There is also a lot of can't-be-bothered-ness as well. I see it at work where people put their lunch packaging in the regular bin when it could easily be recycled.
    Originally posted by onlyroz
    I'm sure people see me doing that and think the same, because I don't recycle anything. It's not just can't be bothered though, reasons for not recycling vary. I think household recycling is an expensive fad with little evidence it does much for the planet. I know, people are going to be all "no, that's not true!" but actually, having looked at it, it appears to be a heavily tax subsidised industry that has cultivated the demand for it with a lot of one-sided claims. The idea rubbish is too valuable to throw away is emotive - it's certainly not reflected in the prices people pay for post consumer waste. At the risk of making a bad joke, the value of rubbish is about as rubbish as the rubbish. If something is truly worth money, the free market will find a way to use it, no need to throw good money at it.

    So, I think a lot of people have been duped in to supporting a lot of money being wasted on something of little to no value. Rather my tax money went on things like the NHS. Every time you have to wait longer for a hospital appointment or your children's school has budget problems, you can in part thank the subsidised recycling for it.
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 13th Jan 18, 8:13 PM
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    Norman Castle
    I think household recycling is an expensive fad with little evidence it does much for the planet.
    The idea rubbish is too valuable to throw away is emotive - it's certainly not reflected in the prices people pay for post consumer waste.
    Originally posted by Ben84
    At its most basic it reduces the size of landfill sites which is good for the planet.

    Its not about money. There's an environmental cost to not recycling. The value of recycled items may not cover the cost of recycling them but it contributes towards the costs.

    Items "thrown away" don't cease to exist. They may not be visible to you but they will be causing a problem somewhere. Out of sight out of mind?

    I think you are contentedly blinkered and finding excuses not to recycle. How difficult is it?
    Last edited by Norman Castle; 13-01-2018 at 8:18 PM.
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    • Ben84
    • By Ben84 13th Jan 18, 9:40 PM
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    Ben84
    At its most basic it reduces the size of landfill sites which is good for the planet.

    Its not about money. There's an environmental cost to not recycling. The value of recycled items may not cover the cost of recycling them but it contributes towards the costs.

    Items "thrown away" don't cease to exist. They may not be visible to you but they will be causing a problem somewhere. Out of sight out of mind?

    I think you are contentedly blinkered and finding excuses not to recycle. How difficult is it?
    Originally posted by Norman Castle
    Non-toxic items in landfill are not harmful, and they're not gone forever, in the future if they're worth it they can be recovered.

    However, increasingly rubbish isn't going to landfill. Where I live all of the general rubbish is burnt in power stations to make electricity. Metals are recovered from the ashes, and the remainder is used to make construction materials. The waste to energy power plants here opened between the late 90s/early 2000s, yet all of the people I know living here who have told me I should recycle have no idea our rubbish hasn't even been going to landfill all this time. Even the council who know about these plants drop off leaflets referring to saving rubbish from landfills. Like I said, a lot of people are being duped with a strange story. General waste is far less of a problem than it once was, we can put it in to power stations and out comes useful products. Yet the environmental impact of throwing out general rubbish is often presented to be much worse than it is, and the benefits of recycling household waste I've seen are not compelling. Largely it's been rhetoric and what I call 'scale of it statistics', like 'if everyone recycled three plastic bottles we could make a _____' which is a very limited representation of the situation. What does it cost in money and resources to recycle these three bottles, is it even net positive to the environment?

    I think it is about the money - not just because we should spend money carefully - because the money situation is why I don't believe it's good for the environment more. Collecting, sorting and cleaning rubbish is all resource and money consuming, so that's not helping us or the environment. That leaves manufacturing as the only other place where it can save money and resources. This should be ringing alarm bells. Where are the manufacturers who want post-consumer waste? It does not command high prices and often ends up piling up. If manufacturers could turn it in to things and save resources/money while doing it, why aren't they seeking it out and paying more? Something doesn't add up. There are big, obvious holes in the story we usually hear. The idea it's worth it needs more justification than just belief it is, I think at this point some real numbers need to be presented. But many people keep recycling and not questioning.

    How difficult is it to recycle? It's quite easy. But hard or not was never my point, I'm talking about if it's even worth any effort. I haven't been convinced, I've been given misleading information by the council, no real statistics, it all looks sketchy.
    • kimplus8
    • By kimplus8 13th Jan 18, 10:18 PM
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    kimplus8
    Very true. But it is still no excuse not to pick up the dog mess.

    Nor should the bags then be hung on trees, as some people obviously do. Disgusting.

    I type as a dog owner too.
    Originally posted by uberalles
    this seriously winds me up, there is a thicket alongside the road where the children and I walk to school with an array of nappy sacks and black doggy bags filled with poo hanging along the branches. its disgusting.
    and lazy as 50 yards each end is a dog bin.
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    • Judi
    • By Judi 13th Jan 18, 10:39 PM
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    Judi
    I recycle on the weeks we have recyclables collected but refuse to have recyclables stored for a fortnightly collection.
    Last edited by Judi; 14-01-2018 at 3:59 AM.
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    • DeputyDawgg
    • By DeputyDawgg 14th Jan 18, 12:05 AM
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    DeputyDawgg
    Non-toxic items in landfill are not harmful, and they're not gone forever, in the future if they're worth it they can be recovered.

    However, increasingly rubbish isn't going to landfill. Where I live all of the general rubbish is burnt in power stations to make electricity. Metals are recovered from the ashes, and the remainder is used to make construction materials. The waste to energy power plants here opened between the late 90s/early 2000s, yet all of the people I know living here who have told me I should recycle have no idea our rubbish hasn't even been going to landfill all this time. Even the council who know about these plants drop off leaflets referring to saving rubbish from landfills. Like I said, a lot of people are being duped with a strange story. General waste is far less of a problem than it once was, we can put it in to power stations and out comes useful products. Yet the environmental impact of throwing out general rubbish is often presented to be much worse than it is, and the benefits of recycling household waste I've seen are not compelling. Largely it's been rhetoric and what I call 'scale of it statistics', like 'if everyone recycled three plastic bottles we could make a _____' which is a very limited representation of the situation. What does it cost in money and resources to recycle these three bottles, is it even net positive to the environment?

    I think it is about the money - not just because we should spend money carefully - because the money situation is why I don't believe it's good for the environment more. Collecting, sorting and cleaning rubbish is all resource and money consuming, so that's not helping us or the environment. That leaves manufacturing as the only other place where it can save money and resources. This should be ringing alarm bells. Where are the manufacturers who want post-consumer waste? It does not command high prices and often ends up piling up. If manufacturers could turn it in to things and save resources/money while doing it, why aren't they seeking it out and paying more? Something doesn't add up. There are big, obvious holes in the story we usually hear. The idea it's worth it needs more justification than just belief it is, I think at this point some real numbers need to be presented. But many people keep recycling and not questioning.

    How difficult is it to recycle? It's quite easy. But hard or not was never my point, I'm talking about if it's even worth any effort. I haven't been convinced, I've been given misleading information by the council, no real statistics, it all looks sketchy.
    Originally posted by Ben84
    Some good points there, is it a good use of resources for highly expensively
    educated people to spend their time recycling garbabe?

    On the other side of the coin it is the only productive work they will ever do in their lives.

    Is it worth the effort to spend so much time on something which has a value to society of about 0.1p per item?

    Especially so when billions of tonnes of CO2 and huge amounts of energy are expend administering the system.

    Is it worth spending £10 billion saving a couple of turtles?

    The reality is you are not saving any anyway.

    They will likely end up on the minister for the Environments dinner table anyway.
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 14th Jan 18, 9:01 AM
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    Norman Castle
    Non-toxic items in landfill are not harmful, They take up space. Landfill sites are a limited size and new ones are rarely welcomed.

    However, increasingly rubbish isn't going to landfill. Where I live all of the general rubbish is burnt in power stations to make electricity. Metals are recovered from the ashes, and the remainder is used to make construction materials. General waste is far less of a problem than it once was, we can put it in to power stations and out comes useful products.

    The fact that it is burnt doesn't make that the best option. When done properly burning may be better than landfill but removing usable materials before rather than after through recycling is likely to provide a better solution.


    Where are the manufacturers who want post-consumer waste? It does not command high prices and often ends up piling up. If manufacturers could turn it in to things and save resources/money while doing it, why aren't they seeking it out and paying more? Something doesn't add up.
    Recycled waste can command high prices. Metals are always wanted with prices that can be high. My council recycles glass as aggregate for road building. Plastics are difficult to recycle so reuse has to be cost effective for manufacturers. Paper and card is often rejected due to poor recycling (being soiled or mixed with unwelcome items).

    How difficult is it to recycle? It's quite easy. But hard or not was never my point, I'm talking about if it's even worth any effort. I haven't been convinced, I've been given misleading information (that general waste is burnt?, see above) by the council, no real statistics, it all looks sketchy.
    Originally posted by Ben84
    Have you ever recycled but then decided to change you behaviour? Your arguments all appear self serving to support your reluctance to recycle rather than valid reasons against recycling.
    Saying "it all looks sketchy" sounds a bit paranoid. If you can demonstrate your council can deal with waste in a better way I'm sure they would welcome your help .
    Last edited by Norman Castle; 14-01-2018 at 9:23 AM.
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    • Ben84
    • By Ben84 14th Jan 18, 2:11 PM
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    Ben84
    Have you ever recycled but then decided to change you behaviour? Your arguments all appear self serving to support your reluctance to recycle rather than valid reasons against recycling.
    Saying "it all looks sketchy" sounds a bit paranoid. If you can demonstrate your council can deal with waste in a better way I'm sure they would welcome your help .
    Originally posted by Norman Castle
    Yes, I used to recycle. The misleading information is the information I've been given about where non-recycled materials go. Either recycling is being promoted by people who don't actually know the full story about our waste, or they're just choosing to exaggerate the environmental impact. Neither possibility is reassuring.

    Metals can be economical to recycle, but the metal I throw in the regular rubbish also gets recovered, so it doesn't matter which bin it goes in. So why do they encourage it to go in the recycling bin?

    Recycled glass is commonly crushed to make aggregate, but when it's thrown in the regular rubbish here it will equally find its way in to aggregate. Much like metal, it doesn't matter which bin it goes in.

    Suspecting I'm being self-serving or paranoid doesn't in any way counteract the points I made. They're either reasonable, or they're not. We can suggest anyone of any opinion is self serving or paranoid, so it's kind of meaningless and sidesteps responding. However, I do appreciate you're given alternate points to some of what I said, so I know this isn't your whole point.

    I don't think the council would welcome my ideas! The public love recycling, politicians who object to it would have a massive uphill battle to even overcome the idea all non-recyclers are planet hating or ignorant. They have also invested heavily in recycling and probably wouldn't like to admit it has downsides.

    Anyway, you might be surprised to learn I'm very interested in environmental issues and post a lot on the green and ethical board about saving energy, water, reducing waste and being vegan. I was just posting about waste reduction and the benefits of reducing vs. recycling in this thread which explains a bit more why I don't do it:

    http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?p=73714416#post73714416

    I think household waste recycling has become an environmental problem. Too much consumption in the first place is the major cause of rubbish, not lack of recycling. Assumptions about recycling and poor understanding of the fate of non-recycled materials also often encourages people away from the most efficient options. The anti-plastic trend at the moment is a big environmental problem, it's causing people to reduce plastic and accordingly consume far more energy and resource intensive metal, glass and paper. I know, I'm not coming from a popular viewpoint a lot of the time, but I think environmentalism is going wrong and mistaken ideas about recycling is a big part of it.
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 14th Jan 18, 4:51 PM
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    Norman Castle
    Metals can be economical to recycle, but the metal I throw in the regular rubbish also gets recovered, so it doesn't matter which bin it goes in. So why do they encourage it to go in the recycling bin?

    Recycled glass is commonly crushed to make aggregate, but when it's thrown in the regular rubbish here it will equally find its way in to aggregate. Much like metal, it doesn't matter which bin it goes in.

    Suspecting I'm being self-serving or paranoid doesn't in any way counteract the points I made. They're either reasonable, or they're not. We can suggest anyone of any opinion is self serving or paranoid, so it's kind of meaningless and sidesteps responding. However, I do appreciate you're given alternate points to some of what I said, so I know this isn't your whole point.

    I think environmentalism is going wrong and mistaken ideas about recycling is a big part of it.
    Originally posted by Ben84
    Residents separating metal and glass before incineration has to be a more efficient process than sifting through the ashes.

    Questioning the viability of recycling is fine but referring to the councils response as sketchy and claims of misleading information sound paranoid although I suspect they're not.
    Its true that recycling isn't a simple, solve everything solution and that there may be opportunities for councils to perform better but until these can be demonstrated and offered recycling is likely to be better than not recycling.
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    • Ben84
    • By Ben84 14th Jan 18, 6:06 PM
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    Ben84
    Residents separating metal and glass before incineration has to be a more efficient process than sifting through the ashes.

    Questioning the viability of recycling is fine but referring to the councils response as sketchy and claims of misleading information sound paranoid although I suspect they're not.
    Its true that recycling isn't a simple, solve everything solution and that there may be opportunities for councils to perform better but until these can be demonstrated and offered recycling is likely to be better than not recycling.
    Originally posted by Norman Castle
    I wouldn't assume it's more efficient - there's real data out there we can look up:

    http://www.iswa.org/home/news/news-detail/browse/25/article/bottom-ash-report-now-online/109/

    Pages 13-18 are interesting. It's a multiple stage process with potentially high efficiency. Mostly, magnetic metals are pretty straightforward, a magnet picks those out. However, with the use of eddy currents, they can selectively pick out aluminium, copper, silver, zinc, gold, iron, bronze and stainless steel. The incineration process is also able to separate materials in an efficient manner, for example burning wooden handles off saucepans or removing plastics from composite plastic-metal items. They say on page 18 an existing plant is recovering about 75% of the metal available, but a new plant is expected to recover 90%. With proper processing, waste to energy power stations can recover a large fraction of the metal - including from multiple material items we don't normally recycle, and a wider range of metal types than any recycling system I know of. Curbside recycling will probably never beat a good recovery process at a power station - these can easily separate metals from flammable materials while recovering their energy, handle small pieces with ease, and collect so many more varieties of metal.

    Glass is equally efficient to process either way. All the glass that goes in to the power station comes out the other end available as aggregate. No need to rinse either.

    As for the council, the situation has been that they say themselves on their website that the general waste in our region is all going to power stations, but they also send out leaflets describing the ills of landfilling non-recycled waste. Only one of the two can be true, so they are telling us conflicting things. I believe it going to power stations however is correct as the contractors have a web site listing the plants and how much waste they consume, its percentage of total household waste, and area they cover. The recycling leaflets are written to persuade, often presenting general waste disposal as it happened decades ago.

    So, is recycling likely to be better than not recycling? Well, sending your waste to a modern waste to energy power station is technically recycling it as the energy is recovered, and if the outgoing materials are recovered and reused, which is pretty commonplace, it's also saving material resources. So, it's not really recycling vs. not recycling, it's household sorting and curbside collecting vs. large scale processing. I think large scale processing is better. For a start, you don't have to worry about contamination or people adding things to the wrong bin Both of these have and continue to be serious problems with household recycling.
    Last edited by Ben84; 14-01-2018 at 6:21 PM.
    • lewishardwick
    • By lewishardwick 14th Jan 18, 6:21 PM
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    lewishardwick
    I have exactly this problem. I have a vitriolic hatred of these people. Are they really that thick?! Even worse when they dump a carrier bag of jars and cans when the lid very clearly says NO CARRIER BAGS!

    When it's possible to identify these people, there should be heavy fines. £500+! Seems the only way to get people to not be lazy gits is to hit them where it hurts, the pocket.

    Urgh!
    • Ben84
    • By Ben84 14th Jan 18, 7:15 PM
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    Ben84
    I have exactly this problem. I have a vitriolic hatred of these people. Are they really that thick?! Even worse when they dump a carrier bag of jars and cans when the lid very clearly says NO CARRIER BAGS!

    When it's possible to identify these people, there should be heavy fines. £500+! Seems the only way to get people to not be lazy gits is to hit them where it hurts, the pocket.

    Urgh!
    Originally posted by lewishardwick
    That kind of thing is already happening:

    http://www.cambridge-news.co.uk/news/cambridge-news/pensioner-slapped-240-fly-tipping-12617809

    http://www.cambridge-news.co.uk/incoming/woman-faces-hefty-fly-tipping-12653323

    I bet these two won't be doing any more recycling! So, I'm not so sure it's an effective approach. I certainly don't think it's proportional or fair.

    I also don't like the approach with these fines where you're pressurised to pay within a few days or they go up dramatically, it's just a bully tactic. Although it's not strictly about recycling fines, I think these pay up soon or it goes up fines should be scrapped, because they're pressurising people to shut up and pay up out of fear it will go up if they try to defend themselves.
    Last edited by Ben84; 14-01-2018 at 7:20 PM.
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