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  • FIRST POST
    • Tink_04
    • By Tink_04 6th Jan 18, 12:21 PM
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    Tink_04
    Gluten free baking
    • #1
    • 6th Jan 18, 12:21 PM
    Gluten free baking 6th Jan 18 at 12:21 PM
    Ok Iíve been gluten free for a couple of months and itís made a huge difference to my health and medical condition. Howerever im now getting a bit bored and buying Ďspecialí stuff is expensive!

    Iíve never been a great baker - I can cook but baking is a whole different area for me. Iíd like to make a GF pizza doh or a loaf and maybe some baked snacks? Iíve looked online and there is a lot with a lot of strange ingredients - Iím looking for more of a basic OS recipe that I can either adapt or a place with easier recipe idea?

    What sort of store cupboard stuff is worth it if Iím GF? Iíve got flour and thatís about it so far! I didnít think it would be this complicated!

    Thanks - Tink
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Page 1
    • theoretica
    • By theoretica 6th Jan 18, 12:28 PM
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    theoretica
    • #2
    • 6th Jan 18, 12:28 PM
    • #2
    • 6th Jan 18, 12:28 PM
    Buckwheat and gram (chickpea) flours are worth trying out. Also just about all recipes need more water when changing from wheat to gf flours.
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    • wort
    • By wort 6th Jan 18, 12:43 PM
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    wort
    • #3
    • 6th Jan 18, 12:43 PM
    • #3
    • 6th Jan 18, 12:43 PM
    I'm coeliac and find it quite easy these days, I've baked cakes using juvela white mix, the box comes with a sachet of yeast to make bread but I've never tried it.
    A basic cake is delias all in one. 2 eggs then 4 oz of all other cake ingredients, plus a teaspoon of gf baking power.
    The white mix is easy to use as you find a lot of g free recipe books use about 3 different kinds of flour just for 1 recipe.
    I think juvela website has some recipes, to follow using their mixes.
    I did once buy xanthine gum but only used it once.
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    • Nicki
    • By Nicki 6th Jan 18, 1:25 PM
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    Nicki
    • #4
    • 6th Jan 18, 1:25 PM
    • #4
    • 6th Jan 18, 1:25 PM
    I've tried all of these cake recipes which all work really well

    https://www.nigella.com/recipes/lemon-polenta-cake
    https://www.nigella.com/recipes/flourless-chocolate-brownies-with-hot-chocolate-sauce a
    https://www.nigella.com/recipes/chocolate-olive-oil-cake

    I've always found gluten free bread and pizza making a challenge however
    • XSpender
    • By XSpender 6th Jan 18, 1:40 PM
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    XSpender
    • #5
    • 6th Jan 18, 1:40 PM
    • #5
    • 6th Jan 18, 1:40 PM
    The only GF bread I have made that I liked was using the Juvela mix in the breadmaker.

    Most biscuit recipes work, the texture is just shorter so you get a dryer crispier biscuit than a chewy one.

    I make Mary Berry's Victoria Sponge cake (8oz of flour, butter, sugar, 1 tsp of baking powder and 4 eggs) but add an extra egg to help with the raising.

    Meringues are gluten free.

    Bakes using ground almonds are good too.
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    • Katieowl
    • By Katieowl 6th Jan 18, 1:44 PM
    • 126 Posts
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    Katieowl
    • #6
    • 6th Jan 18, 1:44 PM
    • #6
    • 6th Jan 18, 1:44 PM
    I do a LOT of GF baking, for work and at home, I don't eat wheat at all. Or things like malt vinegar, soy sauce etc. I check ALL my labels.

    At home my go to for a starch substance is pancakes made with GF Flour. I usually use about half GF buckwheat flour too. I also use pancakes to make lasagne for the family or 'cannaloni" savoury stuffed roll ups.

    Not all GF flours are equal. Asda and Aldi both have potato in their plain white, which is good if you want a chewier base. I tend to prefer Doves plain white GF for cakes, and lighter pancakes.

    I use Xanthan gum in a lot of recipes now, it vastly improves the structure, and also physillium husk. Apart from that you don't need much except to check labels on things like baking powder, stock cubes etc

    Gram flour makes a good savoury pancake, google besan chilla, and of course can be used for pakora a great GF snack.

    I do love buckwheat flour, I like the taste of it, and I add it to lots of things I bake. You can very rarely do a straight swap for ordinary flour in a recipe though. My top tip on cakes is to look for recipes that use very little if any actual flour. Polenta cakes (get a fine grind or it's gritty), ground almonds or other nuts made into flour, anything with a low flour content ie choc cakes with 150g of flour or less will prob sub ok.

    If you want bread try this recipe as a starting point :
    https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2009/may/23/baking-white-bread
    I didnt think it looked particularly healthy, so I've played around with it and come up with a more nutritous loaf, but it doesn't behave like bread dough, throw the rule book out, it needed loads more liquid not be too dry, so it is more like a batter, and very very sticky, but it cooks up great, just be sure to well oil and flour (rice flour) the tin. Or use a liner.

    Also if you are using oats, you might want to make sure they are GF too? Not all coeliacs can tolerate them anyway, but Aldi and Tesco both sell certified GF oats in the free from section, I'm sure other supermarkets do too. Twice the price, but hey!
    • Fen1
    • By Fen1 6th Jan 18, 3:19 PM
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    Fen1
    • #7
    • 6th Jan 18, 3:19 PM
    • #7
    • 6th Jan 18, 3:19 PM
    Hi. I have to be gluten and dairy free. I looked up the Juvela as it has been mentioned on here a few times, but it contains milk.


    I'm not much of a baker, either. After trying umpteen different ways of trying to make decent bread, Ive given up. I now buy M&S own brand brown seeded bread which is good both toasted AND untoasted!!!!
    • Tink_04
    • By Tink_04 6th Jan 18, 4:57 PM
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    Tink_04
    • #8
    • 6th Jan 18, 4:57 PM
    • #8
    • 6th Jan 18, 4:57 PM
    Wow this sounds more complicated than I thought! I thought I could just sub normal flour for GF flour and all would be good ...... I’ve never heard of any of this other stuff!
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    • theoretica
    • By theoretica 6th Jan 18, 5:16 PM
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    theoretica
    • #9
    • 6th Jan 18, 5:16 PM
    • #9
    • 6th Jan 18, 5:16 PM
    You can just replace with the gf flour (and usually a bit of water) in most recipes, and it turns out OK, but to get better than OK you will probably find it good to expand into some of the more specialised stuff.
    But a banker, engaged at enormous expense,
    Had the whole of their cash in his care.
    Lewis Carroll
    • Katieowl
    • By Katieowl 6th Jan 18, 5:17 PM
    • 126 Posts
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    Katieowl
    Wow this sounds more complicated than I thought! I thought I could just sub normal flour for GF flour and all would be good ...... I’ve never heard of any of this other stuff!
    Originally posted by Tink_04
    Straight subs rarely work because the gluten is the element that holds things together... so it allows the stretch that allows air pockets to form in bread and makes a cohesive crumb in cake...the more other things you remove, for example eggs, the harder it is to make something that doesn't just become a pile of soggyness. So Xanthan puts back some of the glue, and physillium seems to make a stretchy texture. Just a heads up if you tip over the xanthan don't take a wet cloth to it, to clear it up, brush up as much as possible. or your hands will end up covered in goo in a really BAD WAY!

    Lots of the almond cakes (very nice by the way) are quite high in eggs. Don't be put off, just find a recipe that loads of people have raved about and follow it to the letter. If you want books...there are a couple of River cottage ones that are straight forward and a great Darina Allen one!
    • maddiemay
    • By maddiemay 6th Jan 18, 5:24 PM
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    maddiemay
    There are a couple of really kind and helpful groups of the book of faces if you have that. One lady who makes fab bakes swears by the Asda flour and on another thread the guy is more than happy with Doves. Not sure if I should post details here, but can pm if interested.

    Taste is a very subjective thing and my (non GF) OH and I both dislike the graininess of the Doves, but so far are happy with the couple of things I have tried with the Asda.

    At the very least with GF flour I find that more liquid and more egg is needed to help replace the gluten and if not included i.e. plain flour probably Xanthum gum or physillium husk. I have a couple of goto bread recipes, but they involve quite a lot of ingredients (I am retired so quite happy to fiddle around making up flour blends). I keep reading about Juvela, do they sell to one if not coeliac does anyone know?

    If you can eat oats, either standard or GF you could try flapjacks/breakfast bar type things adding seeds, nuts, dried fruit etc, lots of recipes on line, as said anything that uses ground almonds such as brownies, macaroons (not the posh time consuming ones perhaps) and good old cornflake/rice crispy cakes and coconut pyramids are quick and easy. All a bit high calorie, depends on what you need.

    I don't have a sweet tooth and find the savoury route much more difficult, but GF Jusroll pastry will make cheese straws, pinwheels etc. I have a great cheese scone recipe, but it is one of the more complex mix ones, so I tend to make a batch and freeze, they defrost well. I love the Nairns GF cheese oatcakes, but like most of the other stuff they are pretty expensive, for me they are great to carry one of the little packs with me and eat when having soup or a salad when eating out.
    • janb5
    • By janb5 6th Jan 18, 8:09 PM
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    janb5
    Up to recently I had to make GF cakes weekly as part of the cakes I make for my son`s work.

    I agree with Nicki that the easiest ones are those which are flourless but often have ground almonds in... flourless chocolate brownie was very reliable.
    • juliesname
    • By juliesname 6th Jan 18, 9:04 PM
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    juliesname
    Rich fruit cake eg Delia's Christmas/birthday cake works as the flour content is low - avoid supermarket glace cherries and mixed peel if strictly wheat-free as glucose syrup is often made with wheat, can sub extra grated zest.
    • Katieowl
    • By Katieowl 6th Jan 18, 10:17 PM
    • 126 Posts
    • 1,487 Thanks
    Katieowl
    Rich fruit cake eg Delia's Christmas/birthday cake works as the flour content is low - avoid supermarket glace cherries and mixed peel if strictly wheat-free as glucose syrup is often made with wheat, can sub extra grated zest.
    Originally posted by juliesname
    Its considered to be gluten free whatever the source,I do believe, as it's very highly processed.
    • tigerfeet2006
    • By tigerfeet2006 6th Jan 18, 11:01 PM
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    tigerfeet2006
    These are great GF (and DF if required) biscuits that I used to make when my son had to have a GF diet. There are a few GF recipes in the recipe list in the Grocery Challenge recipe collection.

    Peanut Butter Cookies.

    Preheat oven to 180degC. Put parchment on a baking tray. Mix together 6oz of caster sugar and 7oz peanut butter (I buy SM value range.) Add an egg and a tsp bicarb soda. Roll balls of mixture in the palm of your hand and flatten. Bake in the oven for 10-15 mins.

    Gingerbread Biscuits.

    Preheat oven to 190degC and put parchment on a baking tray. Sift 350g GF plain flour (I use Doves) into a bowl. Add 2tsp ginger and a tsp of bicarb. Put in 100g butter (for DF use something like Pure) and rub it in till it looks like breadcrumbs. Add 100g of dark brown sugar and 75g of caster sugar, 1 egg and 4tbsp honey. Mix it to a soft dough. If it is to wet then add some more flour, if to dry add a few drops of water. Knead dough on a floured surface, until smooth. Roll into balls in the palm of your hand and flatten. Bake for 10-15 mins until lightly brown.

    Plain Biscuits.

    Mix together 150g of GF flour, 100g ground almonds, 1 1/2 tsp GF baking powder, 1/2 tsp bicarb. In another bowl cream together 85g butter (for DF use something like Pure) and 200g caster sugar. Add an egg and 1tsp vanilla extract.. Gently add the flour to the other mixture untill you have a stiff dough, add more flour if needs be. Divide in two and wrap in clingfilm and chill for two hours.

    Preheat oven to 190 degC. Roll out dough on a floured surcae and cut out shapes using cutters and place on an ungreased baking tray. Leave plenty of space between them. If dough gets to soft bung in the freezer to firm up for a while. Bake for 8-10 minutes until golden.

    I think these were from the Gluten Free Cookbook for kids. I do the PB cookies a lot for school things.
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    • juliesname
    • By juliesname 6th Jan 18, 11:34 PM
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    juliesname
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by juliesname
    Rich fruit cake eg Delia's Christmas/birthday cake works as the flour content is low - avoid supermarket glace cherries and mixed peel if strictly wheat-free as glucose syrup is often made with wheat, can sub extra grated zest.
    Quote:Its considered to be gluten free whatever the source,I do believe, as it's very highly processed.
    Agreed that it complies with the gluten-free rules as it's below the official levels, but I react to it (possibly wheat intolerance as well as gluten intolerance) so I avoid unless the ingredients list specifies a non-wheat source. It's a pain reading packets all the time but less of a pain than accidentally eating something I shouldn't!
    • Tink_04
    • By Tink_04 17th Jan 18, 9:10 AM
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    Tink_04
    Thanks everyone I’ve been looking at some FB groups and have found some things to try, going to make GF Yorkshire puddings and going to try the peanut butter cookies mentioned above too.
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