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  • FIRST POST
    • jill36
    • By jill36 5th Jan 18, 12:28 AM
    • 878Posts
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    jill36
    Dental Implants
    • #1
    • 5th Jan 18, 12:28 AM
    Dental Implants 5th Jan 18 at 12:28 AM
    Anyone had a dental implant/s - would you recommend this?




Page 1
    • silvercar
    • By silvercar 5th Jan 18, 8:47 AM
    • 36,426 Posts
    • 153,956 Thanks
    silvercar
    • #2
    • 5th Jan 18, 8:47 AM
    • #2
    • 5th Jan 18, 8:47 AM
    Yes and yes.
    • brianposter
    • By brianposter 5th Jan 18, 9:02 AM
    • 171 Posts
    • 36 Thanks
    brianposter
    • #3
    • 5th Jan 18, 9:02 AM
    • #3
    • 5th Jan 18, 9:02 AM
    Be very careful. Mine was a disaster until I discovered that it needed washing in vinegar.
    • Toothsmith
    • By Toothsmith 6th Jan 18, 9:53 AM
    • 8,769 Posts
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    Toothsmith
    • #4
    • 6th Jan 18, 9:53 AM
    • #4
    • 6th Jan 18, 9:53 AM
    Anyone had a dental implant/s - would you recommend this?
    Originally posted by jill36
    It completely depends on why you feel they would be a good idea?

    If itís because a life of fags and Coca Cola have rotted your own teeth away - then implants would be a total disaster unless you have modified your lifestyle choices! But then, until that has happened, you probably wouldnít be recommended them by any decent dentist anyway.

    If itís to replace one or more teeth in an otherwise well cared for dentition, and itís been recommended by a dentist who has thoroughly examined you, and you have trust in - then itís probably a very good idea.

    And I have no idea what Brianposter is on about with the vinegar!!!

    You do not clean dental implants with vinegar!!!
    How to find a dentist.
    1. Get recommendations from friends/family/neighbours/etc.
    2. Once you have a short-list, VISIT the practices - dont just phone. Go on the pretext of getting a Practice Leaflet.
    3. Assess the helpfulness of the staff and the level of the facilities.
    4. Only book initial appointment when you find a place you are happy with.
    • silvercar
    • By silvercar 6th Jan 18, 11:26 AM
    • 36,426 Posts
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    silvercar
    • #5
    • 6th Jan 18, 11:26 AM
    • #5
    • 6th Jan 18, 11:26 AM
    And I have no idea what Brianposter is on about with the vinegar!!!

    You do not clean dental implants with vinegar!!!
    Phew! it didn't look like spam, but I wondered if there was something that I was unaware of.

    Given that you can't remove implants for cleaning, the idea of rinsing with vinegar was not attractive.
    • Toothsmith
    • By Toothsmith 6th Jan 18, 12:12 PM
    • 8,769 Posts
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    Toothsmith
    • #6
    • 6th Jan 18, 12:12 PM
    • #6
    • 6th Jan 18, 12:12 PM
    I can’t really think of anything dental related that should be cleaned with vinegar. My theory is that he was replying to a different thread!
    How to find a dentist.
    1. Get recommendations from friends/family/neighbours/etc.
    2. Once you have a short-list, VISIT the practices - dont just phone. Go on the pretext of getting a Practice Leaflet.
    3. Assess the helpfulness of the staff and the level of the facilities.
    4. Only book initial appointment when you find a place you are happy with.
    • brianposter
    • By brianposter 7th Jan 18, 11:59 AM
    • 171 Posts
    • 36 Thanks
    brianposter
    • #7
    • 7th Jan 18, 11:59 AM
    • #7
    • 7th Jan 18, 11:59 AM
    I canít really think of anything dental related that should be cleaned with vinegar. My theory is that he was replying to a different thread!
    Originally posted by Toothsmith
    The implant seemed to produce an allergic reaction in my gums and nobody, including the manufacturers (Biomet), seemed to have any idea what to do about it. Even removal was not practical as the implant was properly rooted.

    After over a year of agony I tried rinsing the implant in vinegar. The result was almost miraculous and the implant became quite tolerable. Presumably the vinegar changed the surface structure of the implant.
    • brook2jack
    • By brook2jack 7th Jan 18, 1:03 PM
    • 4,074 Posts
    • 3,695 Thanks
    brook2jack
    • #8
    • 7th Jan 18, 1:03 PM
    • #8
    • 7th Jan 18, 1:03 PM
    It would be a very bad idea for anyone to rinse regularly with vinegar as it would start to damage their own natural teeth permanently.

    Biomet implant surfaces are treated with calcium phosphate , I think, in order to promote bone healing and decrease bacterial load.

    The acetic acid in the vinegar may have reacted with the calcium phosphate dissolving it off the surface of the implant where it was in contact with the gums.

    The underlying titanium would be very unlikely to be affected by the acetic acid.
    • GwylimT
    • By GwylimT 7th Jan 18, 1:05 PM
    • 5,995 Posts
    • 11,140 Thanks
    GwylimT
    • #9
    • 7th Jan 18, 1:05 PM
    • #9
    • 7th Jan 18, 1:05 PM
    I have one, it replaced a tooth who had an arguement with a golf club, I have had it about eight years, I personally haven't had any problems and had an easy recovery.
    • Toothsmith
    • By Toothsmith 8th Jan 18, 12:33 PM
    • 8,769 Posts
    • 10,431 Thanks
    Toothsmith
    The implant seemed to produce an allergic reaction in my gums and nobody, including the manufacturers (Biomet), seemed to have any idea what to do about it. Even removal was not practical as the implant was properly rooted.

    After over a year of agony I tried rinsing the implant in vinegar. The result was almost miraculous and the implant became quite tolerable. Presumably the vinegar changed the surface structure of the implant.
    Originally posted by brianposter
    Maybe you should have volunteered a bit more information with your original post then?

    This is the first time I have heard of anything like that - either anecdotally or properly reported in the scientific literature. It will be a vanishingly rare complication, and not really one that an average patient would have to worry about.

    I do appreciate that up until it happened to you - you too would have been an 'average' patient.

    Who suggested the vinegar? How did you apply it to the right surface of the implant? How long did it take to help?

    My concern on people writing about such rare experiences is that others might think it's happening to them - and just writing 'washing it with vinegar' is such a brief description that it could lead others to a lot of harm.

    The most common problem with implants are caused by people not cleaning them properly. If anyone gets the idea that 'washing with vinegar' might help that - then not only will the implants be even more damaged, but, as Brook said - it will do irreversible harm to their own natural teeth too!
    How to find a dentist.
    1. Get recommendations from friends/family/neighbours/etc.
    2. Once you have a short-list, VISIT the practices - dont just phone. Go on the pretext of getting a Practice Leaflet.
    3. Assess the helpfulness of the staff and the level of the facilities.
    4. Only book initial appointment when you find a place you are happy with.
    • brianposter
    • By brianposter 8th Jan 18, 7:57 PM
    • 171 Posts
    • 36 Thanks
    brianposter
    Biomet implant surfaces are treated with calcium phosphate , I think, in order to promote bone healing and decrease bacterial load.

    The acetic acid in the vinegar may have reacted with the calcium phosphate dissolving it off the surface of the implant where it was in contact with the gums.
    Originally posted by brook2jack
    That is the first explanation I have heard that seems to be consistent with the symptoms.
    • brianposter
    • By brianposter 8th Jan 18, 8:41 PM
    • 171 Posts
    • 36 Thanks
    brianposter
    This is the first time I have heard of anything like that - either anecdotally or properly reported in the scientific literature. It will be a vanishingly rare complication, and not really one that an average patient would have to worry about.
    Originally posted by Toothsmith
    I am always suspicious of this sort of statement - I remember how long it took to persuade the medical profession that gastric ulcers were caused by bacteria.

    Who suggested the vinegar? How did you apply it to the right surface of the implant? How long did it take to help?

    My concern on people writing about such rare experiences is that others might think it's happening to them - and just writing 'washing it with vinegar' is such a brief description that it could lead others to a lot of harm.
    I was expecting the manufacturers to suggest some sort of surface treatment but they did not come up with anything.
    The vinegar required only a single simple rinse and within a day or two the situation was completely transformed.
    • silvercar
    • By silvercar 8th Jan 18, 11:34 PM
    • 36,426 Posts
    • 153,956 Thanks
    silvercar
    I am always suspicious of this sort of statement - I remember how long it took to persuade the medical profession that gastric ulcers were caused by bacteria.

    I was expecting the manufacturers to suggest some sort of surface treatment but they did not come up with anything.
    The vinegar required only a single simple rinse and within a day or two the situation was completely transformed.
    Originally posted by brianposter
    But what made you try vinegar and not anything else?
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