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    • Budapest123
    • By Budapest123 3rd Jan 18, 8:47 PM
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    Budapest123
    Vendor wants to leave things in garage
    • #1
    • 3rd Jan 18, 8:47 PM
    Vendor wants to leave things in garage 3rd Jan 18 at 8:47 PM
    Hi!

    Clueless FTB here looking for some advice. Offer accepted in October, with an aim to complete by the end of January.

    Just bumped into the vendor by chance in the street, who mentioned that they are moving by themselves and were hoping to be able to leave some stuff in the garage.

    Didnít really say much, but isnít this a terrible idea? If the items get damaged etc. Also, the garage is connected to the house, so either they keep the keys or organise for us to pick up.

    The vendors have been quite nice, so donít want to let anyone down. Anyway of handling this gently?
Page 3
    • Cakeguts
    • By Cakeguts 4th Jan 18, 4:59 PM
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    Cakeguts
    All I can hear is: 'are you stupid enough to provide free storage, guard my stuff, keep out of the garage in case you damage something, provide me with access when I want it, let my relative/friend/dodgy acquaintance in at their convenience....ad infinitum......'.

    For all you know it could be something dodgy you are taking care of
    Originally posted by Margot123
    Is it me? Am I going even more bonkers? I wouldn't dream of asking a buyer if I could go round and pick up something I had left behind later. I just wouldn't want to expect someone who wasn't a friend or relative to want to put themselves out like that. To me that would be really selfish on my part that I hadn't arranged my affairs in order not to impact on anyone else.

    It really makes me wonder about the mindset of the person thinking that doing this is alright.

    As you say if they don't mind putting other people out they could leave absolutely anything in the garage.
    • Elle Woods
    • By Elle Woods 4th Jan 18, 5:01 PM
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    Elle Woods
    If the OP actually wanted to make use of that garage space immediately, I'd agree that it would be a neutral act to refuse to suffer pain/inconvenience yourself in order to avoid somebody else suffering similarly.
    Originally posted by ThePants999
    It's perfectly acceptable to ask for a favour, just as it's perfectly acceptable for the other person to decline.
    Originally posted by ThePants999
    From my (admittedly selective!) quoting of your posts ThePants999, I think many of our views on this are fairly similar. My objection was to the suggestion that the person being asked is wrong to decline and should feel bad about doing so.
    • ThePants999
    • By ThePants999 4th Jan 18, 5:04 PM
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    ThePants999
    From my (admittedly selective!) quoting of your posts ThePants999, I think many of our views on this are fairly similar. My objection was to the suggestion that the person being asked is wrong to decline and should feel bad about doing so.
    Originally posted by Elle Woods
    Absolutely. I still stand by "mean spirited", but "mean spirited" doesn't mean "wrong" More like... "Jesus would have preferred you picked the other option, but you still get to go to heaven" or something, I guess
    • Cakeguts
    • By Cakeguts 4th Jan 18, 5:21 PM
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    Cakeguts
    Absolutely. I still stand by "mean spirited", but "mean spirited" doesn't mean "wrong" More like... "Jesus would have preferred you picked the other option, but you still get to go to heaven" or something, I guess
    Originally posted by ThePants999
    The problem is that you can't have any idea of what sort of impact asking can have on the person who you need the favour from so in the long run it is just better not to ask. It is one of those things where you can't tell what else is going on in the buyer's life because you don't know them well enough.

    What you are doing is asking quite a big favour of someone who you don't really know. So you don't know anything about their life. In many cases I think it would be better for the buyer not to be put into the position where they have to say no. Which is why I am suggesting that leaving stuff behind should not ever be considered.
    • ThePants999
    • By ThePants999 4th Jan 18, 5:28 PM
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    ThePants999
    Okay, I think I understand your position a bit better now. I still disagree with it, though. I think it's reasonable to expect others to be able to evaluate for themselves the impact of acquiescing to a request, and to say no if that impact is too great, so I don't think we should all be holding back from asking favours just in case we're dealing with someone who can't say no.
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 4th Jan 18, 5:53 PM
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    davidmcn
    We are talking about a garden. You can't come back and take plants out of a garden after completion.
    Originally posted by Cakeguts
    We're talking about plants in pots, not plants in the ground (which would be different).
    • Cakeguts
    • By Cakeguts 4th Jan 18, 6:00 PM
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    Cakeguts
    Okay, I think I understand your position a bit better now. I still disagree with it, though. I think it's reasonable to expect others to be able to evaluate for themselves the impact of acquiescing to a request, and to say no if that impact is too great, so I don't think we should all be holding back from asking favours just in case we're dealing with someone who can't say no.
    Originally posted by ThePants999
    The problem with the request in these circumstances is that it shouldn't need to be asked. Asking a virtual stranger for a favour that only really suits one person in a situation where you don't know what else is in the person's life and you shouldn't really be asking anyway.

    Basically I don't think that most people would ask someone they met in the street on a few occasions if they could leave something in the garage of that person's house. They would think it was a bit rude and would probably want to get to know the other person a bit better before asking. In the case of a buyer they are just like the person you have met in the street a couple of times and yet you are asking if you can leave something in their garage. I don't think that people realise that the house buying and selling doesn't make them close friends with their buyer. They are asking a virtual stranger to do them an big favour. It doesn't benefit the buyer at all for this to happen.

    I also don't think that someone asking to leave something for two weeks ever thinks about it from the point of view of the buyer. How many people want a stranger to leave something in their garage with a promise to pick it up in 2 weeks. The promise is worth nothing because they also promised not to leave anything in the house when they signed the contract and they have already broken that promise by asking the question so basically you can't rely on anything they say they will do.

    I would think a lot of people say yes when they mean no. I have no idea what happens if someone breaks into a garden and steals a load of pots or breaks into a garage and steals what is in there?
    • Cakeguts
    • By Cakeguts 4th Jan 18, 6:11 PM
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    Cakeguts
    We're talking about plants in pots, not plants in the ground (which would be different).
    Originally posted by davidmcn
    I agree but how is the buyer supposed to know which plants they can keep and which ones they can't? Not only that but what happens if someone in the background of the buyer breaks into the garden and steals the plants in the pots? The problem is that neither party thinks that they are dealing with someone they don't know. But they don't know them they only know them from a couple of viewings of the property they aren't close friends.

    The person being asked about leaving stuff is being asked by a stranger who they have met on a few occasions and the person doing the leaving is leaving their stuff with a stranger.

    The post about someone leaving pots in a garden where the new owners wouldn't mind because they weren't moving in until they had had work done. That means more strangers in the garden seeing the pots. How long do you think it would take for someone to tell someone in the pub about these big pots and for them all to disappear from a garden attached to an empty house? What is the buyer going to think about that and will the seller blame them for the loss of their pots?

    It is so much simpler for people to just not ask which is why the contract is for vacant possession.
    • phoebe1989seb
    • By phoebe1989seb 4th Jan 18, 6:41 PM
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    phoebe1989seb
    I understand that but on here there are people who will take advantage of others. There are people on here who don't empty their houses before completion takes place this does inconvenience people and it would just be all so much simpler if people just took everything out before completion so that that was the normal way of doing things and people didn't leave stuff behind to pick up later.

    Some people will say yes just to be nice. If that happens then they are being taken advantage of. Leaving stuff behind should be the absolute exception not something that people feel that they can ask to happen and certainly not something that buyers should feel that they have to offer because they are nice people.

    Do you not think that your buyers would be just as happy if you removed the plants before completion?

    I assume that you will be paying your buyers for the rent of their garden with something to the value of the storage costs you have saved?
    Originally posted by Cakeguts
    a) we didn't ask them, they offered.....whilst admitting they're feeling bad about the situation we are in because of them;

    b) of course they'd be just as happy, but they offered and are not moving in straight away - they've volunteered that they want to do this;

    c) WRT our previous situation where we stored our stuff at the property between exchange and completion, we offered our vendors rent - actually gave it to them - and they refused, handing it straight back. It had never entered our heads to ask to store stuff there, nor to do it without making suitable payment.

    We have already reached an agreement regarding payment for this favour in our current situation.

    I guess (most of) the people we've dealt with during our house buying/selling experiences - are nice people......yes
    Paid off mortgage early - mortgage-free since age 40 (2007)

    Over £40,000 mis-sold PPI reclaimed
    • phoebe1989seb
    • By phoebe1989seb 4th Jan 18, 6:48 PM
    • 3,189 Posts
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    phoebe1989seb
    I agree but how is the buyer supposed to know which plants they can keep and which ones they can't? Not only that but what happens if someone in the background of the buyer breaks into the garden and steals the plants in the pots? The problem is that neither party thinks that they are dealing with someone they don't know. But they don't know them they only know them from a couple of viewings of the property they aren't close friends.

    The person being asked about leaving stuff is being asked by a stranger who they have met on a few occasions and the person doing the leaving is leaving their stuff with a stranger.

    The post about someone leaving pots in a garden where the new owners wouldn't mind because they weren't moving in until they had had work done. That means more strangers in the garden seeing the pots. How long do you think it would take for someone to tell someone in the pub about these big pots and for them all to disappear from a garden attached to an empty house? What is the buyer going to think about that and will the seller blame them for the loss of their pots?

    It is so much simpler for people to just not ask which is why the contract is for vacant possession.
    Originally posted by Cakeguts
    I'll say it again - the plants in question are all in pots/planters.

    Our situation might be unusual in that the builders concerned are all closely related to/work for the person closely related to our buyers.....so it's unlikely anything will go missing.

    Not only that but it's a very difficult property to gain access to

    Our buyers have actually visited the property six/seven times, each visit lasting between one and three hours. As a result we have come to know them quite well and have a friendly relationship, so whilst not exactly friends we trust them and in the same way, they trust us to come back for those items when we say we will.

    I'll bow out now as I've hijacked the OP's thread enough......
    Paid off mortgage early - mortgage-free since age 40 (2007)

    Over £40,000 mis-sold PPI reclaimed
    • jimbo747
    • By jimbo747 4th Jan 18, 6:50 PM
    • 333 Posts
    • 869 Thanks
    jimbo747
    Tell them to stick it in one of those self storage places. A garage style lock up for the month will be £100 or so. And they can get cracking now rather than moving day.

    It's what we did for most of our stuff as we were moving ourselves, granted it was only 200 metres down the road.
    • steampowered
    • By steampowered 4th Jan 18, 8:34 PM
    • 2,083 Posts
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    steampowered
    All I can hear is: 'are you stupid enough to provide free storage, guard my stuff, keep out of the garage in case you damage something, provide me with access when I want it, let my relative/friend/dodgy acquaintance in at their convenience....ad infinitum......'.

    For all you know it could be something dodgy you are taking care of
    Originally posted by Margot123
    I think this is a ridiculously risk averse view to take.

    If you take the view that you are not going to do anything nice because there is a chance of it going wrong, you'd never get out of bed in the morning. You wouldn't take a shower for fear you'd slip on a bar of soap and break your neck.

    And you'd certainly never buy a property. Because for all you know the electrics could be dangerous, and the roof could be falling down, and the neighbour could be a serial killer.

    Back in the real world, is it really that much of an inconvenience to have someone's stuff in your garage for a few days while they move?

    The risk of the seller leaving their crap in the garage for a few days longer than you'd like is a tiny risk in the overall list of risks one takes when buying a property.
    • Cakeguts
    • By Cakeguts 5th Jan 18, 12:04 AM
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    Cakeguts
    I think this is a ridiculously risk averse view to take.

    If you take the view that you are not going to do anything nice because there is a chance of it going wrong, you'd never get out of bed in the morning. You wouldn't take a shower for fear you'd slip on a bar of soap and break your neck.

    And you'd certainly never buy a property. Because for all you know the electrics could be dangerous, and the roof could be falling down, and the neighbour could be a serial killer.

    Back in the real world, is it really that much of an inconvenience to have someone's stuff in your garage for a few days while they move?

    The risk of the seller leaving their crap in the garage for a few days longer than you'd like is a tiny risk in the overall list of risks one takes when buying a property.
    Originally posted by steampowered
    So far I haven't heard any ideas as to what happens if someone breaks in and steals stuff left in garages or gardens?
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 5th Jan 18, 12:12 AM
    • 2,181 Posts
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    Red-Squirrel
    Tell them to stick it in one of those self storage places. A garage style lock up for the month will be £100 or so. And they can get cracking now rather than moving day.

    It's what we did for most of our stuff as we were moving ourselves, granted it was only 200 metres down the road.
    Originally posted by jimbo747
    Some will collect it all for you for a bit more money.
    • steampowered
    • By steampowered 5th Jan 18, 9:16 AM
    • 2,083 Posts
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    steampowered
    So far I haven't heard any ideas as to what happens if someone breaks in and steals stuff left in garages or gardens?
    Originally posted by Cakeguts
    Someone could break in and steal things regardless of whether the seller's stuff is there or not.
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 5th Jan 18, 9:23 AM
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    davidmcn
    So far I haven't heard any ideas as to what happens if someone breaks in and steals stuff left in garages or gardens?
    Originally posted by Cakeguts
    What do you mean by "what happens"?
    • badmemory
    • By badmemory 5th Jan 18, 10:08 AM
    • 1,232 Posts
    • 1,342 Thanks
    badmemory
    Doing something nice is what you do by donating to charity, giving a handout to someone on the street, helping out a friend when they need a hand, it is not giving a total stranger free access to your property (ie your garage etc). My garage is for keeping my car in (yes i know this is revolutionary these days) it is not for other people's junk.
    Last edited by badmemory; 05-01-2018 at 10:12 AM.
    • Cakeguts
    • By Cakeguts 5th Jan 18, 5:29 PM
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    Cakeguts
    Someone could break in and steal things regardless of whether the seller's stuff is there or not.
    Originally posted by steampowered
    Of course they can but what would the vendor say to the buyer if someone broke in and stole the vendor's stuff that they had left behind? Would they be likely to accuse the buyer of taking it?
    • steampowered
    • By steampowered 5th Jan 18, 5:38 PM
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    steampowered
    Of course they can but what would the vendor say to the buyer if someone broke in and stole the vendor's stuff that they had left behind? Would they be likely to accuse the buyer of taking it?
    Originally posted by Cakeguts
    Then the buyer confirms they didn't steal the stuff, and there is nothing more the seller can do?

    This is getting a bit silly now. The chances of a garage getting burgled so that the burglars can steal miscellaneous items of furniture, and the buyer then accusing the seller of stealing the stuff, are pretty much zero.
    • Cakeguts
    • By Cakeguts 5th Jan 18, 6:01 PM
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    Cakeguts
    Then the buyer confirms they didn't steal the stuff, and there is nothing more the seller can do?

    This is getting a bit silly now. The chances of a garage getting burgled so that the burglars can steal miscellaneous items of furniture, and the buyer then accusing the seller of stealing the stuff, are pretty much zero.
    Originally posted by steampowered
    We don't know what the seller wants to leave behind. I think it is more likely that someone will steal pots from a garden. Getting into the garden may be a problem but if the house is empty thieves have all the time they need especially over a weekend.

    Many places are watched before people break in so that they know when they are unattended.
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