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  • FIRST POST
    • Pyxis
    • By Pyxis 30th Dec 17, 9:59 AM
    • 32,165Posts
    • 118,516Thanks
    Pyxis
    Well! I never knew that!
    • #1
    • 30th Dec 17, 9:59 AM
    Well! I never knew that! 30th Dec 17 at 9:59 AM
    I was googling the difference between nuts and seeds, when I came across a reference to cashew nuts and how they grew!

    I was so surprised! "Well!", I said, "I never knew that!"

    I don't know what I expected, as I'd never thought about it before. That in itself was strange, as I've been eating cashews for years and years.

    Maybe I just assumed they grew in pods like peanuts, but they don't!

    They start to grow on the ends of flowers which turn into yellow or red pear-shaped cashew "apples".
    They grow inside a case which has an irritant chemical on it to stop animals eating it. This is removed by proper roasting of the cashews.

    Apparently the cashew apples are also edible, but being very soft, do not travel well. They can be made into a refreshing drink.




    It got me wondering what you may have come across, little gems of info about things you have taken for granted for years without knowing the true facts about them.

    Do tell!




    .
    (I just lurve spiders! )
    INFJ(Turbulent).

    Her Greenliness Baroness Pyxis of the Alphabetty, Pinnacle of Peadom
    Founder Member: WIMPS ANONYMOUS
Page 5
    • NaughtiusMaximus
    • By NaughtiusMaximus 7th Jan 18, 2:57 PM
    • 555 Posts
    • 1,353 Thanks
    NaughtiusMaximus
    The new Crossrail trains will be 650 feet long. That's around two-thirds longer than a typical Tube train.
    Originally posted by Cornucopia
    ...which is almost exactly half the length of the latest Eurostar trains which travel from London to Paris at 400 metres/1312 feet long (a quarter of a mile).
    • Syman
    • By Syman 7th Jan 18, 3:13 PM
    • 2,425 Posts
    • 5,982 Thanks
    Syman


    There are more differences between them, and also the related animals, guanaco and vicuna...........
    http://saexpeditions.com/blog/post/know-your-camelid-is-it-a-llama-alpaca-guanaco-or-vicuna
    https://www.inkari-alpaca.com/en/blogs/thealpacablog/10-differences-between-llamas-and-alpacas/


    (Annoying spelling mistake in the picture!)
    Originally posted by Pyxis
    reminded me of a picture i took in Surrey.

    Last edited by Syman; 07-01-2018 at 3:18 PM.
    Never put off till tomorrow what you can do today!
    Cos if you do it today and like it...You can do it again tomorrow..


    Bookworm's Thread 2018 reading Challenge total :- 3/48
    • Pyxis
    • By Pyxis 7th Jan 18, 5:09 PM
    • 32,165 Posts
    • 118,516 Thanks
    Pyxis
    reminded me of a picture i took in Surrey.

    Originally posted by Syman
    Well, I had to google that, , and this is what I found.......

    QUOTE
    A guard llama is a llama, guanaco, alpaca or hybrid that is used in farming to protect sheep, goats, hens or other livestock from coyotes, dogs, foxes and other predators.

    In the past, a single gelded (castrated) male was recommended. In more recent years it has been discovered that single, unbred females make better and safer guardians, as they do not pose the risk of attempting copulation (hence smothering) or chasing the smaller livestock.UNQUOTE


    Apparently, if kept on its own as a guard llama, it bonds with the group of animals it is protecting. If there is more than one llama they will bond with the other llamas and not care about the animals to be guarded!


    Well! I never knew that!
    (I just lurve spiders! )
    INFJ(Turbulent).

    Her Greenliness Baroness Pyxis of the Alphabetty, Pinnacle of Peadom
    Founder Member: WIMPS ANONYMOUS
    • vansboy
    • By vansboy 7th Jan 18, 7:29 PM
    • 6,104 Posts
    • 4,369 Thanks
    vansboy
    o you know what some railings and fences around some areas of London, were actually made for, initially?

    Until I saw THIS I had no idea.

    VB
    • Pyxis
    • By Pyxis 7th Jan 18, 8:28 PM
    • 32,165 Posts
    • 118,516 Thanks
    Pyxis
    That was interesting!


    I didn't know that, either!
    (I just lurve spiders! )
    INFJ(Turbulent).

    Her Greenliness Baroness Pyxis of the Alphabetty, Pinnacle of Peadom
    Founder Member: WIMPS ANONYMOUS
    • vivatifosi
    • By vivatifosi 12th Jan 18, 1:21 PM
    • 17,584 Posts
    • 109,931 Thanks
    vivatifosi
    A quarter of all of the trees in the world are in Russia. The scale of deforestation there is similar to the Amazon.

    I've just been watching Simon Reeve's Russia
    Please stay safe in the sun and learn the A-E of melanoma: A = asymmetry, B = irregular borders, C= different colours, D= diameter, larger than 6mm, E = evolving, is your mole changing? Most moles are not cancerous, any doubts, please check next time you visit your GP.
    • Pyxis
    • By Pyxis 12th Jan 18, 6:28 PM
    • 32,165 Posts
    • 118,516 Thanks
    Pyxis
    I don't know why I didn't know this, but I've just found out that snakes have skeletons consisting of numerous vertebrae with ribs attached.

    "However, whereas an adult human has 206 bones, snakes can have 400 or more bones depending on the species, but snakes, unlike most mammals including humans, only have a few types of bones: the skull, jawbones and the spine with its vertebrae and ribs."


    Here is a complete snake skeleton........

    (I just lurve spiders! )
    INFJ(Turbulent).

    Her Greenliness Baroness Pyxis of the Alphabetty, Pinnacle of Peadom
    Founder Member: WIMPS ANONYMOUS
    • MothballsWallet
    • By MothballsWallet 12th Jan 18, 9:23 PM
    • 11,812 Posts
    • 15,610 Thanks
    MothballsWallet
    A quarter of all of the trees in the world are in Russia. The scale of deforestation there is similar to the Amazon.

    I've just been watching Simon Reeve's Russia
    Originally posted by vivatifosi
    It's not on iPlayer though
    I live in the UK City of Culture 2021

    Married to an immigrant.

    Always ask yourself one question: What would Gibbs do?
    • squiggles
    • By squiggles 12th Jan 18, 10:48 PM
    • 1,235 Posts
    • 2,369 Thanks
    squiggles
    After reading the snakes have skeletons post I just had to google if worms also have bones, no they don't.
    • DeputyDawgg
    • By DeputyDawgg 13th Jan 18, 1:22 AM
    • 189 Posts
    • 104 Thanks
    DeputyDawgg
    A quarter of all of the trees in the world are in Russia. The scale of deforestation there is similar to the Amazon.

    I've just been watching Simon Reeve's Russia
    Originally posted by vivatifosi
    You mean non-existent?

    Last edited by DeputyDawgg; 13-01-2018 at 1:24 AM.
    • Pyxis
    • By Pyxis 13th Jan 18, 6:38 AM
    • 32,165 Posts
    • 118,516 Thanks
    Pyxis
    After reading the snakes have skeletons post I just had to google if worms also have bones, no they don't.
    Originally posted by squiggles
    Yes, I suppose I vaguely thought that because they are so wiggly and flexible, snakes must be invertebrates, like worms etc, but thinking about it, they couldn't be because they have fangs, and fangs have to be set in bone, ipso facto they must be vertebrates!

    I didn't expect to see such a beautiful skeleton, though!

    Again, thinking about it, a slinky is very flexible, but is made from hard metal!
    I really shouldn't stereotype substances!
    (I just lurve spiders! )
    INFJ(Turbulent).

    Her Greenliness Baroness Pyxis of the Alphabetty, Pinnacle of Peadom
    Founder Member: WIMPS ANONYMOUS
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