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    • wingates
    • By wingates 11th Dec 17, 10:41 PM
    • 123Posts
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    wingates
    Returning packaging to supermarkets.
    • #1
    • 11th Dec 17, 10:41 PM
    Returning packaging to supermarkets. 11th Dec 17 at 10:41 PM
    I have tried searching this on here to no avail. Some people are saying that supermarkets have to take back plastic packaging to be recycled. My council (Bolton) cannot recycle most plastic packaging. Any thoughts?
    A watched pot always boils.
Page 1
    • worried jim
    • By worried jim 11th Dec 17, 10:43 PM
    • 8,860 Posts
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    worried jim
    • #2
    • 11th Dec 17, 10:43 PM
    • #2
    • 11th Dec 17, 10:43 PM
    They’ll just stick it in landfill.
    "Only two things are infinite-the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not so sure about the universe"
    Albert Einstein
    • Ben84
    • By Ben84 11th Dec 17, 11:21 PM
    • 2,925 Posts
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    Ben84
    • #3
    • 11th Dec 17, 11:21 PM
    • #3
    • 11th Dec 17, 11:21 PM
    I've never heard of this, I think you'd have to ask them to know for sure. If you do, would be interesting to know what they say?

    However, if they accept it and don't say where it goes, I wouldn't assume they have recycling for it. On the other hand, I would also look up what happens to your rubbish. Where I live the rubbish is burnt in waste to energy power stations which turn it in to electricity, generate very little air pollution, then the ashes undergo metal recover, with the remainder after that used in construction materials. Throwing rubbish in the bin here has a pretty minimal environmental impact. Surprisingly though, many people around here - even environmentally interested people - still commonly think it's all just going in landfill. So far, nobody I've talked to has realised our region haven't been landfilling rubbish for about 15-20 years now.
    • AmerzD
    • By AmerzD 4th Jan 18, 11:29 PM
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    AmerzD
    • #4
    • 4th Jan 18, 11:29 PM
    • #4
    • 4th Jan 18, 11:29 PM
    Yes, large supermarkets now have containers, usually near the exit after the tills, where you can bring back a wide variety of plastics which councils don't accept in recycling bins. As far as I'm aware, they are recycling what they collect but I can't be sure. The types of plastic accepted are thin carrier bags, cereal bags, bread bags etc. There is a full list here on the 'recyclenow' webiste. The forum won't let me post the link but search 'what to do with plastic film and carrier bags' on that website, also really useful for other recycyling questions!
    • theboylard
    • By theboylard 5th Jan 18, 3:57 PM
    • 1,135 Posts
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    theboylard
    • #5
    • 5th Jan 18, 3:57 PM
    • #5
    • 5th Jan 18, 3:57 PM
    All of the big supermarkets recycle their own rubbish - one depot I personally know in the East Midlands invested 500k in a bigger compacter.
    All the stores returned their waste to the depot so the vehicles weren't running empty on the return leg, better use of them/economy etc.
    7 years ago it was returning about £3M annually to the depot bottom line, so if they can make money out of cardboard and plastic wrap, I'm sure they'll take it back.
    The only issue is the cost of the extra labour at the retail store - because folk won't clean their recycling - so they'll fight that as the money goes to the depot, not the store.
    4kWp, SSE, 16 x 250w EcoFuture BoB with retro-fitted SolarEdge P300 optimisers & SE3500 Inverter, in occasionally sunny Corby, Northants.
    • Ben84
    • By Ben84 6th Jan 18, 7:01 PM
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    Ben84
    • #6
    • 6th Jan 18, 7:01 PM
    • #6
    • 6th Jan 18, 7:01 PM
    Yes, large supermarkets now have containers, usually near the exit after the tills, where you can bring back a wide variety of plastics which councils don't accept in recycling bins. As far as I'm aware, they are recycling what they collect but I can't be sure. The types of plastic accepted are thin carrier bags, cereal bags, bread bags etc. There is a full list here on the 'recyclenow' webiste. The forum won't let me post the link but search 'what to do with plastic film and carrier bags' on that website, also really useful for other recycyling questions!
    Originally posted by AmerzD
    I'm pretty sure you mean www.recyclenow.com ?

    I haven't see much plastic recycling at my local supermarkets though. They have some bins for plastic bags, and that's all I'm aware of. A search on recyclenow for my local area turned up a lot of bottle banks and some textile banks, and that's it. I don't live in the middle of nowhere though, suburb of a medium size city. Either regions vary, or the site isn't listing all the locations/materials?
    • AmerzD
    • By AmerzD 7th Jan 18, 9:55 PM
    • 4 Posts
    • 4 Thanks
    AmerzD
    • #7
    • 7th Jan 18, 9:55 PM
    • #7
    • 7th Jan 18, 9:55 PM
    HI Ben

    Yes, that is the website, as I'm new the forum wouldn't let me post the link.
    Those bins for the plastic bags are also for the other plastics on that list.
    • Ben84
    • By Ben84 9th Jan 18, 2:41 PM
    • 2,925 Posts
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    Ben84
    • #8
    • 9th Jan 18, 2:41 PM
    • #8
    • 9th Jan 18, 2:41 PM
    HI Ben

    Yes, that is the website, as I'm new the forum wouldn't let me post the link.
    Those bins for the plastic bags are also for the other plastics on that list.
    Originally posted by AmerzD
    I understand, had same problem when I first registered.

    Yes, those plastic bag bins can have a few things put in them, various film plastics - although not all it appears. Some of the right ones are commonly used for packaging frozen foods, toilet paper, etc. so not just the carrier bags. I have no idea what they're doing with them though. To be honest, they don't make up much waste in our house and I just throw them out.

    A big one people ask about is the other bulky plastic items, like tubs and pots, etc. Mine mostly turn in to plant pots after a I poke a few holes in the bottom (I give away a lot of plants each year so need more all the time), but that's not an option for everyone.
    • jack_pott
    • By jack_pott 9th Jan 18, 4:49 PM
    • 4,364 Posts
    • 5,661 Thanks
    jack_pott
    • #9
    • 9th Jan 18, 4:49 PM
    • #9
    • 9th Jan 18, 4:49 PM
    The reason that councils don't take thin plastic like clingfilm and polythene bags is that they can't be recycled, so taking them to the supermarket won't make any difference. (It was on the news just last week.)
    I'm not upset that you lied to me, I'm upset that from now on I can't believe you.
    Friedrich Nietzsche
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