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  • FIRST POST
    • Crazy Diamond
    • By Crazy Diamond 7th Dec 17, 10:35 PM
    • 105Posts
    • 55Thanks
    Crazy Diamond
    Purchases from company in administration (multiyork)
    • #1
    • 7th Dec 17, 10:35 PM
    Purchases from company in administration (multiyork) 7th Dec 17 at 10:35 PM
    I understand that Multiyork went into administration in November however it is still trading whilst in administration.

    I would like to purchase a bookcase from them however I am wondering whether this is a good idea/whether the order would be fullfilled. I intend to use a credit card as added security but does anyone know whether orders placed with the administrators would be guaranteed to be delivered?
Page 1
    • bobbymotors
    • By bobbymotors 7th Dec 17, 10:37 PM
    • 543 Posts
    • 737 Thanks
    bobbymotors
    • #2
    • 7th Dec 17, 10:37 PM
    • #2
    • 7th Dec 17, 10:37 PM
    i would avoid the likely grief to be honest.
    • unholyangel
    • By unholyangel 8th Dec 17, 1:03 AM
    • 11,600 Posts
    • 8,735 Thanks
    unholyangel
    • #3
    • 8th Dec 17, 1:03 AM
    • #3
    • 8th Dec 17, 1:03 AM
    You have to remember that the purpose of administration is to rescue the company and if that can't be achieved, to minimise the loss to its creditors.

    Usually its gift card customers who are shafted as they already have the benefit of the money so providing them with goods is not going to minimise the losses to creditors.

    I presume the bookcase is more than £100? If so paying by credit card should protect you if the worst does happen as your claim would be against the credit card company rather than be reliant on recovering money from the company. The only difference would be that (if the company actually goes under) you'd be limited to claiming against the card company rather than have the option of who to chase/chasing both.

    However, sometimes companies in financial trouble won't accept card payments (indeed not accepting card payments itself can indicate a potential cash flow problem), so be wary of that.
    Money doesn't solve poverty.....it creates it.
    • Crazy Diamond
    • By Crazy Diamond 8th Dec 17, 6:39 AM
    • 105 Posts
    • 55 Thanks
    Crazy Diamond
    • #4
    • 8th Dec 17, 6:39 AM
    • #4
    • 8th Dec 17, 6:39 AM
    Many thanks. Does anyone know if the credit card protection will definately work?

    I have read elsewhere that for credit card protection to work there must be a direct connection between you (the debtor), your credit card supplier e.g. American Express or Barclays (the creditor) and the retailer supplying your goods or services (the supplier) and if you use a third-party to take payment e.g paypal, then you won’t necessarily be covered. In this case would the admiistrators be counted as a third party?
    • photome
    • By photome 8th Dec 17, 7:01 AM
    • 12,823 Posts
    • 8,298 Thanks
    photome
    • #5
    • 8th Dec 17, 7:01 AM
    • #5
    • 8th Dec 17, 7:01 AM
    I thought i heard they were not making anything to order.

    ie only selling either what they have on the shop floor or in the warehouse.

    personally i wouldnt buy anything that wasnt available to take away
    • unholyangel
    • By unholyangel 8th Dec 17, 5:31 PM
    • 11,600 Posts
    • 8,735 Thanks
    unholyangel
    • #6
    • 8th Dec 17, 5:31 PM
    • #6
    • 8th Dec 17, 5:31 PM
    Many thanks. Does anyone know if the credit card protection will definately work?

    I have read elsewhere that for credit card protection to work there must be a direct connection between you (the debtor), your credit card supplier e.g. American Express or Barclays (the creditor) and the retailer supplying your goods or services (the supplier) and if you use a third-party to take payment e.g paypal, then you won’t necessarily be covered. In this case would the admiistrators be counted as a third party?
    Originally posted by Crazy Diamond
    Paypal doesn't always break the link, it depends on exact circumstances behind the steps in the payment process - and really only the FoS or courts could give an accurate judgement on whether section 75 would apply or not.

    In some instances, the customer will do it via their paypal account, which can break the required chain as you are essentially using the credit card to pay paypal, then using paypal to pay the supplier. However sometimes paypal only acts as a merchant acquirer (payment processor rather than a escrow/middleman service) and in those circumstances, they do not break the chain.
    Money doesn't solve poverty.....it creates it.
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 8th Dec 17, 5:44 PM
    • 10,038 Posts
    • 8,098 Thanks
    lincroft1710
    • #7
    • 8th Dec 17, 5:44 PM
    • #7
    • 8th Dec 17, 5:44 PM
    i would avoid the likely grief to be honest.
    Originally posted by bobbymotors
    Agreed .
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