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  • FIRST POST
    • JohnJones80
    • By JohnJones80 7th Dec 17, 6:54 PM
    • 4Posts
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    JohnJones80
    Job role / responsibilities defined
    • #1
    • 7th Dec 17, 6:54 PM
    Job role / responsibilities defined 7th Dec 17 at 6:54 PM
    Hello, I am new to these forums, I just google'd work related issues as I have a problem and would really appreciate anyone's help.

    I am currently employed as a 'Production Operative'. I have been employed in the same company for four years. Prior to this I was working as an engineer for a major company and I am trained to HND level.

    After years of stress in my prior job I am happy to work as a Production Operative, I am paid very little in comparison but really enjoy my job and fortunately do not need more money than I earn currently.

    The problem I have is that 12 months ago my manager left, the supervisor at work was promoted to the manager, I was offered the Supervisor job but made it clear I did not want to change roles and no amount of money they offered would change my mind.

    They told me at the time I was the only candidate capable within the company and therefore would have to employ from outside, which I was fine with, it wasn't my issue.

    However, 12 months later I find myself doing the work of Supervisor, which I rejected and still do not want, without the pay I did not want. Three weeks ago I was once again approached and asked to take the job 'and train as manager' which I once again rejected and I was pretty stern about it.

    Little by little I have been given responsibilities that all the other staff at my level do not. Using stock control systems, booking in stock, planning work for the week, operating machinery, covering for the manager in his absence, giving briefings etc etc. And I have been informed that from next week I will be dealing directly with customers over returned stock, something else that no one else does, it is a Supervisor job!

    I complained to my GM, and he said that my contract states I must complete 'all associated tasks'. But how do I know what is associated? These are not stated.. And why do others not have to complete these 'associated tasks'? When I asked I was told that I am the most competent, but these extra jobs aren't a bonus they're a burden that I do not want.

    Can someone please advise me on what I should do? Is there some way I can get a break down of all tasks under my role, so I know which ones I can reject? I loved my job but now I hate it, I feel one step is out of the door and I really do not want to leave.

    Thank you so much for any help.
Page 1
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 7th Dec 17, 7:29 PM
    • 30,858 Posts
    • 18,457 Thanks
    getmore4less
    • #2
    • 7th Dec 17, 7:29 PM
    • #2
    • 7th Dec 17, 7:29 PM
    the problem with trying to get them to define your role is they will add the things they want and still have a catch all clause.

    far better to get too busy doing the stuff you want to do, if there is not enough be very selective about what you take on when asked.

    It is never a good idea to say no I don't WANT to do that far better to be too busy doing other stuff.

    They can still transition you by taking off the jobs you are too busy with.

    Did they ever replace the supervisor?

    eg.
    now they have asked you to take on customer returns ask if that takes priority over all the other stuff you do, what happens if it starts taking too much time is there a policy/procedure you need training on for refunds and restocking etc.
    as this task is normally handled by supervisors what is the escalation process...
    Last edited by getmore4less; 07-12-2017 at 7:35 PM.
    • JohnJones80
    • By JohnJones80 7th Dec 17, 8:09 PM
    • 4 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    JohnJones80
    • #3
    • 7th Dec 17, 8:09 PM
    • #3
    • 7th Dec 17, 8:09 PM
    I cannot be too busy doing things, as they are aware how long those things take and work is strictly to timings. My timetable for the week has gone from doing 100% production work to 50% production work and 50% 'associated tasks', which was previously supervisor work.

    They did not replace the supervisor and wont as long as they have me because they dump it on me. This new role of customer returns will take 10 hours per week, so probably I will be doing 25% of my old role and 75% 'associated tasks', which is exactly what the old supervisor did..

    There will be training for this new role, but again they say it is mandatory.

    If they include all these new tasks in my job role, then surely others will also have these in their roles and do them as much as me? They dont, they dont do any of it only I do.
    • ohreally
    • By ohreally 7th Dec 17, 8:13 PM
    • 6,365 Posts
    • 4,868 Thanks
    ohreally
    • #4
    • 7th Dec 17, 8:13 PM
    • #4
    • 7th Dec 17, 8:13 PM
    Union?.....
    • theoretica
    • By theoretica 7th Dec 17, 11:39 PM
    • 4,950 Posts
    • 6,197 Thanks
    theoretica
    • #5
    • 7th Dec 17, 11:39 PM
    • #5
    • 7th Dec 17, 11:39 PM
    Are you prepared to lose the job if you can't return to your choice of tasks?
    But a banker, engaged at enormous expense,
    Had the whole of their cash in his care.
    Lewis Carroll
    • TELLIT01
    • By TELLIT01 8th Dec 17, 8:06 AM
    • 4,277 Posts
    • 4,454 Thanks
    TELLIT01
    • #6
    • 8th Dec 17, 8:06 AM
    • #6
    • 8th Dec 17, 8:06 AM
    The catch all of "such other work as may be deemed necessary" or similar wording is pretty standard in contracts of employment. It provides the company with flexibility in what they can have people doing, and prevents the problems which destroyed industry in the UK in the 60's, 70's and 80's with restrictive practices ('not my job') and people being dragged out on strike because the wrong person picked up a spanner.
    The downside is what the OP is discovering, that a job can change out of all recognition and there isn't necessarily much the individual can do about it. The OP is probably in a weaker position that many in that they have already taken on much of the work the company wants them to do.
    Short of starting to do all of the supervisory activities so badly the work is taken off them, I think they are probably stuck with it. Given that situation I would be inclined to ask for a pay rise to match the previous supervisor.
    • enjoyyourshoes
    • By enjoyyourshoes 8th Dec 17, 8:16 AM
    • 827 Posts
    • 1,017 Thanks
    enjoyyourshoes
    • #7
    • 8th Dec 17, 8:16 AM
    • #7
    • 8th Dec 17, 8:16 AM
    You are a bit older since you last position that caused you stress, you have learnt more about work, self and how to deal effectively with tasks.

    Looks like the company see something in you?

    Looks like they are really keen to develop your skills and abilities.

    Why not sit down and get a great deal for the additional responsibilities?
    Debt is a symptom, solve the problem.
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 8th Dec 17, 8:27 AM
    • 30,858 Posts
    • 18,457 Thanks
    getmore4less
    • #8
    • 8th Dec 17, 8:27 AM
    • #8
    • 8th Dec 17, 8:27 AM
    or be not so good at the new jobs,

    not too bad so they sack you just take as long as you need so they don't cause stress.

    This new role of customer returns will take 10 hours per week,

    How much of that return time would be for faulty goods?
    • sangie595
    • By sangie595 8th Dec 17, 8:54 AM
    • 4,200 Posts
    • 6,937 Thanks
    sangie595
    • #9
    • 8th Dec 17, 8:54 AM
    • #9
    • 8th Dec 17, 8:54 AM
    I cannot be too busy doing things, as they are aware how long those things take and work is strictly to timings. My timetable for the week has gone from doing 100% production work to 50% production work and 50% 'associated tasks', which was previously supervisor work.

    They did not replace the supervisor and wont as long as they have me because they dump it on me. This new role of customer returns will take 10 hours per week, so probably I will be doing 25% of my old role and 75% 'associated tasks', which is exactly what the old supervisor did..

    There will be training for this new role, but again they say it is mandatory.

    If they include all these new tasks in my job role, then surely others will also have these in their roles and do them as much as me? They dont, they dont do any of it only I do.
    Originally posted by JohnJones80
    And therein lies the rub. It was previously supervisor work. Now it is your work. And if they haven't already figured it out, they can make you do all this work without giving you the pay that goes with it. There's nothing in law that prevents them from giving different types of work to people with the same job title, and there's nothing that says they must pay got more for doing different work than others do either.

    So really, what you want isn't going to happen. Which leaves you with limited choices. Hope they haven't figured it out and ask for the supervisor job - that way at least you get the money that goes with it. Or find another job. Refusing to do the tasks allocated to you isn't an option, unless you wish to be dismissed. Of course, you could follow the advice of stopping doing the tasks so well - but that is taking the risky strategy that it won't backfire on you.

    One thing is pretty clear - one way or another your are going to do the supervisors job, so you may as well get paid for it. And if it isn't already too late for that, it may soon be too late. As soon as they get used to not having to pay for the responsibilities and still have the jobs done, it will be too late to change your mind.
    • JohnJones80
    • By JohnJones80 9th Dec 17, 2:58 PM
    • 4 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    JohnJones80
    Thank you for all the replies here, it was really helpful even though it is clear that I will likely be forced out of this job.

    GM spoke to me yesterday and told me I would be attending Stock / Productivity meetings next week. I told him I am a production operative, no production op in the history of this company has done this, and if I attend these then so should the others. He was pretty rude and told me and told me there is a list of things he has planned for me I cannot refuse to do.

    Did some job seeking today, a couple of jobs that look really promising!

    Hopefully I will be moving on soon, a shame because I really enjoyed my own job, but the mentality of my boss seems to be, if you're rubbish at you're job he leaves you alone, if you are good at your job he forces you into things you dont want to do.. Backwards logic to me, oh well!

    Again, thank you for the replies!
    • iammumtoone
    • By iammumtoone 9th Dec 17, 3:15 PM
    • 5,369 Posts
    • 11,024 Thanks
    iammumtoone
    I dont think you have any choice but to leave.

    In your next job/interview make no mention of what you are capable of. Stick to doing the operative responsibilites well and don't tell anyone of your previous resonsiblites you held otherwise you may find yourself in this situaion again.
    • gettingtheresometime
    • By gettingtheresometime 9th Dec 17, 3:56 PM
    • 3,133 Posts
    • 7,318 Thanks
    gettingtheresometime
    The role of production operative may have needed at the time you took on the role but Iím wondering if youíre scared that if you were to officially accept the role of supervisor (as it sounds youíre doing the job in all but name & pay) that a reoccurrence would happen.

    Iím wondering if a full & frank discussion isnít called for here - they obviously think youíre capable & probably canít understand the attitude youíre taking - do they know your past history?

    Iím not saying that they should know but I know if I was trying to get someone to accept what is effectively a promotion & they refused point blanked Iíd wonder if Iíd got them wrong from the start.
    Lloyds OD / Natwest OD / PO CC / Wescott / Argos Card cleared thanks to the 1 debt v 100 day challenge


    Next on the list - JD Williams
    • TELLIT01
    • By TELLIT01 9th Dec 17, 4:05 PM
    • 4,277 Posts
    • 4,454 Thanks
    TELLIT01
    It shouldn't be necessary to explain why you don't want promotion or additional responsibilities but in this instance I think the OP is going to have to bite the bullet and explain.
    I was in a similar situation not long after joining DWP. They knew I had management and supervisory experience although I had taken a job as Admin Officer. I was pushed several times to take on a Team Leader role and initially simply said NO. I eventually go sick of the almost constant requests / expectations so told them precisely why I wouldn't take on the role, which was because Team Leaders had absolutely no authority to change or improve things and I refused to be the whipping boy for managers and team members. They left me alone after that.
    • Savvy_Sue
    • By Savvy_Sue 9th Dec 17, 8:54 PM
    • 37,876 Posts
    • 34,285 Thanks
    Savvy_Sue
    One other suggestion is to see if you can see a colleague with supervisor potential to train alongside you ... and then get them doing the work while you return to production!
    Still knitting!
    Completed: 1 adult cardigan, 3 baby jumpers, 2 shawls, 3 pairs baby bootees,
    1 Wise Man Knitivity figure + 1 sheep, 2 pairs socks, 1 seaman's hat ...
    Current projects: 1 shawl, another seaman's hat
    • JohnJones80
    • By JohnJones80 10th Dec 17, 12:33 AM
    • 4 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    JohnJones80
    The role of production operative may have needed at the time you took on the role but Iím wondering if youíre scared that if you were to officially accept the role of supervisor (as it sounds youíre doing the job in all but name & pay) that a reoccurrence would happen.

    Iím wondering if a full & frank discussion isnít called for here - they obviously think youíre capable & probably canít understand the attitude youíre taking - do they know your past history?

    Iím not saying that they should know but I know if I was trying to get someone to accept what is effectively a promotion & they refused point blanked Iíd wonder if Iíd got them wrong from the start.
    Originally posted by gettingtheresometime
    I have been very honest with them. They know my situation. I have a partner who is a much higher earner than me (up to £40/hour), she has a stressful job. I want to go to work for 9, finish at 5, and not have to think about work again. I get home and do everything around the house, cook, clean, let my partner come in and relax, her work can be a nightmare, the last thing I want is to be in a responsible position where we are both over worked and stressed, worrying.

    I am in a position where I can just work to live, not live to work, and it really suits me.

    @ TELLIT01. That was brave of you, I do not think my general manager would take it so well if I said that
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