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  • FIRST POST
    • knightstyle
    • By knightstyle 7th Dec 17, 5:36 PM
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    knightstyle
    Retirement property? Any out there?
    • #1
    • 7th Dec 17, 5:36 PM
    Retirement property? Any out there? 7th Dec 17 at 5:36 PM
    So we are both fit and in our 70s. We want to downsize in the next couple of years and want to but a property suitable for now and later.
    We would like to be in a retirement or over 50s complex but the ones we have looked at do not have anywhere we can do things like woodwork, weaving, patchwork and other things we enjoy.
    It seems people just watch TV and play bingo once a week!
    We would like two or three bedrooms, garage, communal hobby room, perhaps a swimming pool.
    These seem common in USA but not in UK.
    Are there any companies we can follow up for this?
    What do you think? Are our requirements too much?
Page 1
    • kingfisherblue
    • By kingfisherblue 7th Dec 17, 6:58 PM
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    kingfisherblue
    • #2
    • 7th Dec 17, 6:58 PM
    • #2
    • 7th Dec 17, 6:58 PM
    Extracare villages have two bedrooms (not sure if they have any three bedroomed places), and they have flats or bungalows, although there are far more flats than bungalows. Everyone has a designated parking space. I'm not sure if the bungalows have garages, but they do have private driveways.

    In the one that I know, there is a main corridor known as Main Street. On Main Street there is a hobbies room, and I know that they have sewing in there, but I'm not sure about woodworking equipment. There is also a small library, a gym, a small shop, a restaurant, a computer room, a bar, and a village hall for entertainment. Darts and pool are available in the bar, and there is a separate quiet room for those who want a quieter drink.

    The bar holds a regular quiz evening and the village hall has visiting acts (Take That tribute band a couple of weeks ago). There are numerous activities, including computer classes, dancing, painting, family history, and others. They also have coach trips out to various places. There is no swimming pool.

    As people age, some need help with personal care and housework. Resident Support Workers are employed directly by Extracare, so there is continuity of staff. They are trained to a high standard - my daughter is a careworker and hasn't worked anywhere that has such good standards. Training for staff is repeated annually. Even bar staff are trained in First Aid and SOVA (Safeguarding of Vulnerable Adults). They also have DBS checks.

    I've no idea whether this is the type of place that you are looking for, or whether all villages offer the same facilities, but here's the link in case you want to have a look: https://www.extracare.org.uk/
    • ProDave
    • By ProDave 7th Dec 17, 6:59 PM
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    ProDave
    • #3
    • 7th Dec 17, 6:59 PM
    • #3
    • 7th Dec 17, 6:59 PM
    Just buy a bungalow in a nice location with enough room for your hobbies. And KEEP ON doing them as long as you wish to.

    All I have ever seen of "retirement complexes" are dormitaries for people "waiting for god" with no active interests. Only 1 step up from a care home.
    • AnotherJoe
    • By AnotherJoe 7th Dec 17, 7:00 PM
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    AnotherJoe
    • #4
    • 7th Dec 17, 7:00 PM
    • #4
    • 7th Dec 17, 7:00 PM
    http://lynwoodvillage.co.uk/village-life/

    ??? (no association, just been browsing ...)
    • kittie
    • By kittie 7th Dec 17, 8:01 PM
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    kittie
    • #5
    • 7th Dec 17, 8:01 PM
    • #5
    • 7th Dec 17, 8:01 PM
    op, same here, I have a woodworking hobby, spinning, sewing, allotment, cycling and need a garage plus a hobby room plus space in my garden for a log cabin to convert to a workshop. I gave up looking and am now looking in a small defined area close to where I presently live. All the facilities I need and no extortionate management fees. Btw, I have been downsizing my belongings for over two years, it takes that long to get rid of stuff I will no longer need, the cutlery, the bedding etc
    • boliston
    • By boliston 7th Dec 17, 8:11 PM
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    boliston
    • #6
    • 7th Dec 17, 8:11 PM
    • #6
    • 7th Dec 17, 8:11 PM
    Just buy a bungalow in a nice location with enough room for your hobbies. And KEEP ON doing them as long as you wish to.

    All I have ever seen of "retirement complexes" are dormitaries for people "waiting for god" with no active interests. Only 1 step up from a care home.
    Originally posted by ProDave
    Do you actually know many people who live in a retirement block?

    A lot of retired people have varied interests that don't involve a "hobby room"

    I'm still a few years away from retiring but my main interests are travel, photography, art, music and theatre, none of which require a dedicated "room"
    • Mutton Geoff
    • By Mutton Geoff 7th Dec 17, 8:16 PM
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    Mutton Geoff
    • #7
    • 7th Dec 17, 8:16 PM
    • #7
    • 7th Dec 17, 8:16 PM
    Also beware of the potential reduction to your legacy by buying these packaged places - BBC News - Half of new-build retirement homes sell at a loss
    Compensations/Refunds from Banks & Institutions - £4,165 | Stooz Profits - £7,636 | Quidco - £4,014

    All with a big thank you to Martin and MSE.com from Mutton Geoff!
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 7th Dec 17, 8:17 PM
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    PasturesNew
    • #8
    • 7th Dec 17, 8:17 PM
    • #8
    • 7th Dec 17, 8:17 PM
    They exist in the US because there are more people to use them - and, in the main, housing/land is much cheaper so they can afford to build them like that.

    Here, every inch counts.

    You need to start by understanding the sort of options there are - and research each one to understand the contract/license and fees too as they all work differently.

    Your downsizing is to a house bigger than the majority of UK families are probably living in .... so to combine a "bigger than average" house with retirement living just isn't going to exist in the main.

    Once you get communal rooms they're really catering to mostly singles/couples who only need one bedroom and a little kitchenette.

    It all comes down to cost really .... build them and they'd be too expensive for people to be able to move there, so they'd fail as a speculative development.

    There might be one out there, hidden away somewhere..... but you need to really put hours of research into locating it!

    The only alternative would be to form your own "club" to buy an older mansion and sub-divide it between your club and create your own "huge retirement houses for people with lots of money who want a lot of space".

    Or buy a regular house across the road from somewhere similar that allows "outsiders" as day visitors.
    • boliston
    • By boliston 7th Dec 17, 8:26 PM
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    boliston
    • #9
    • 7th Dec 17, 8:26 PM
    • #9
    • 7th Dec 17, 8:26 PM
    Also beware of the potential reduction to your legacy by buying these packaged places - BBC News - Half of new-build retirement homes sell at a loss
    Originally posted by Mutton Geoff
    It makes more sense to buy a "used" retirement property as you are not then paying the "new build" premium like you pay when buying a brand new car. Another option is to "test the water" by renting to see if this sort of lifestyle suits before committing to investing in a leasehold apartment.
    • kingfisherblue
    • By kingfisherblue 9th Dec 17, 5:10 PM
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    kingfisherblue
    All I have ever seen of "retirement complexes" are dormitaries for people "waiting for god" with no active interests. Only 1 step up from a care home.
    Originally posted by ProDave
    You obviously haven't seen the one that I have then - it's vibrant and lively, with plenty going on. In addition to the things that I mentioned in my earlier post, there are other activities in the villlage that I know of. I've checked and there is actually a woodworking room, and although still no swimming pool, there is a small pool of some sort (possibly a jacuzzi) near the gym.

    Around one third of people need care, but this can mean help getting out of bed or being given their meds - but not necessarily anything else, because they don't need more help.

    Although buying a bungalow somewhere is always an option for the OP, he specifically asked about retirement complexes. Whilst some may be dire, others are not. The one that is near me is nothing like 'one step up from a care home' - instead, it is somewhere that people are happy to live for a variety of reasons. They have residents from age 55+, and there are several in that age group. There is also a waiting list for flats and bungalows.
    • knightstyle
    • By knightstyle 9th Dec 17, 5:21 PM
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    knightstyle
    Thanks again kingfisherblue that is the sort of thing I was hoping for but we really hope to be within 1 hour of Worthing where we have family and I have tried without any joy to get some idea of costs from them.
    Does anyone have any idea about costs and experience of living in any of their places?
    • Thrugelmir
    • By Thrugelmir 9th Dec 17, 6:13 PM
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    Thrugelmir
    They exist in the US because there are more people to use them - and, in the main, housing/land is much cheaper so they can afford to build them like that.
    Originally posted by PasturesNew
    Gated self contained communities in Florida are somewhat different to UK offerings. Somewhat exclusive too.
    “Opportunities come infrequently. When it rains gold, put out the bucket, not the thimble”
    ― Warren Buffett
    • Murphybear
    • By Murphybear 9th Dec 17, 6:18 PM
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    Murphybear
    There is a brand new retirement village in Exeter which has a lot of the things you are looking for. You will need a large lump sum plus good income as these places can be seriously expensive.

    its called Millbrook Village

    http://www.millbrookvillage.co.uk/images/uploads/pdf/Millbrook-Village-Brochure.pdf
    • Anthorn
    • By Anthorn 10th Dec 17, 12:12 AM
    • 3,293 Posts
    • 847 Thanks
    Anthorn
    So we are both fit and in our 70s. We want to downsize in the next couple of years and want to but a property suitable for now and later.
    We would like to be in a retirement or over 50s complex but the ones we have looked at do not have anywhere we can do things like woodwork, weaving, patchwork and other things we enjoy.
    It seems people just watch TV and play bingo once a week!
    We would like two or three bedrooms, garage, communal hobby room, perhaps a swimming pool.
    These seem common in USA but not in UK.
    Are there any companies we can follow up for this?
    What do you think? Are our requirements too much?
    Originally posted by knightstyle
    Yup I'm living in one right now but it's rented and rented for a reason: That reason is the dismal resale probability / resale value which is likely to affect your heirs rather than yourselves.

    As you say TV, bingo and crafts are the main activities. Where I live add buffets and day trips. But what it's about is not those activities as such but companionship. In a well-managed community it's pretty hard to be lonely unless you lock yourself away and ignore everyone!

    It all depends on your requirements. If you will need emergency assistance and alarm pull-cords you'll likely be stuck with a flat which is part of a larger building. However have a look at Anchor and Hanover which are not for profit housing associations and provide properties for sale in retirement communities and villages as well as rental properties.
    http://www.anchor.org.uk
    http://www.hanover.org.uk

    Looking at your requirements I'd say you have not a cat-in-hell's chance of getting such retirement property in the U.K. As suggested earlier in this thread go with a house or bungalow which is not part of a retirement community and go private if you need a remote alarm service.
    Last edited by Anthorn; 10-12-2017 at 12:16 AM.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 10th Dec 17, 10:12 AM
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    Davesnave
    As suggested earlier in this thread go with a house or bungalow which is not part of a retirement community and go private if you need a remote alarm service.
    Originally posted by Anthorn
    Which is what many 70+ people do.

    I'd advocate village living not far from a town with all the main services. That way, there's the benefits of a small, close-knit community and reasonable convenience.

    My village has a large number of people in their 70s - 80s and quite a few interest groups where they predominate. There's also good back-up from tradespeople in the community who rely on the grey pound.

    It works well for all, except the young. The other problem is that all villages aren't equal; some are deadly dull!
    Last edited by Davesnave; 10-12-2017 at 11:04 AM. Reason: odd punctuation
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