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  • FIRST POST
    • first78
    • By first78 7th Dec 17, 7:11 AM
    • 812Posts
    • 395Thanks
    first78
    Buying a second hand car from garage/dealership
    • #1
    • 7th Dec 17, 7:11 AM
    Buying a second hand car from garage/dealership 7th Dec 17 at 7:11 AM
    I'm going to have to think about buying a new car in the new year. I only have a small deposit and would need to either sell or scrap my existing car.

    I'm a woman and don't have any male friends who can help me, so I want to understand if there's any room to negotiate on the price of cars on a forecourt and what sort of things you say to get the price knocked down.

    I'm going to be looking for a car that is suitable for myself and my two young children. I commute about 40 miles in total per day so don't know if petrol or diesel would be better?

    If anyone can recommend any ways to negotiate price, or suggest makes and models of cars I'd appreciate it. I currently have a Skoda Fabia Estate 2003 and would like something slightly smaller.
Page 1
    • forgotmyname
    • By forgotmyname 7th Dec 17, 8:34 AM
    • 26,200 Posts
    • 10,456 Thanks
    forgotmyname
    • #2
    • 7th Dec 17, 8:34 AM
    • #2
    • 7th Dec 17, 8:34 AM
    Can you haggle, usually yes but there are places where the price is the price, pay it or go away.
    On the plus side they are often well priced to start with.

    Petrol or diesel, well i do 99% short journeys and a diesel works for me.
    Punctuation, Spelling and Grammar will be used sparingly. Due to rising costs of inflation.

    My contribution to MSE. Other contributions will only be used if they cost me nothing.

    Due to me being a tight git.
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 7th Dec 17, 8:38 AM
    • 15,664 Posts
    • 13,978 Thanks
    AdrianC
    • #3
    • 7th Dec 17, 8:38 AM
    • #3
    • 7th Dec 17, 8:38 AM
    40 miles per day is 200 miles/week, less than 10,000/year - so the likelihood of having problems with a modern diesel is high, and the benefit from the extra economy is low.

    If you're looking for something smaller than a Fabia - already a small car, a VW Polo underneath - then you're really looking at the "city car" class (VW Up!, Hyundai i10, Toyota Aygo), a high percentage of which are petrol anyway. But something that size is going to be cramped for transporting two young (growing...) children plus their stuff.

    As far as negotiating goes - there's no magic. It's just the same as any other negotiation. Do your research, so you know fair values for what you're looking at - and be prepared to walk away if you can't get a deal you're happy with.

    What sort of budget are you looking at? Financed? You say "or scrap" - remember that the much-vaunted scrappage deals aren't government-backed, they're just a marketing incentive from the manufacturers, so the deals may be available without scrapping your existing car. Look at the total cost to change.
    • martinthebandit
    • By martinthebandit 7th Dec 17, 8:38 AM
    • 3,317 Posts
    • 5,616 Thanks
    martinthebandit
    • #4
    • 7th Dec 17, 8:38 AM
    • #4
    • 7th Dec 17, 8:38 AM
    If you only have a small deposit you are going to be paying a £100 plus for five years or so at the end of which you will probably be in the same, or similar, position you are now.

    You would be much better off putting that £100 plus into a bank account and using it to keep your existing car running. In 5 years time you will still have a roadworthy old car but a much bigger deposit.
    Politics -
    from the words Poli, meaning many
    and tics meaning blood sucking parasites


    (thanks to Kinky Friedman (or Larry Hardman) for the quote}
    • wgl2014
    • By wgl2014 7th Dec 17, 9:20 AM
    • 401 Posts
    • 238 Thanks
    wgl2014
    • #5
    • 7th Dec 17, 9:20 AM
    • #5
    • 7th Dec 17, 9:20 AM
    Why do you need to get rid of your existing car?
    If it needs a bit of work this may be worth doing rather than paying out for a newer car (it may also not be depending on what is wrong)
    • motorguy
    • By motorguy 7th Dec 17, 10:55 AM
    • 15,785 Posts
    • 9,065 Thanks
    motorguy
    • #6
    • 7th Dec 17, 10:55 AM
    • #6
    • 7th Dec 17, 10:55 AM
    I'm going to have to think about buying a new car in the new year. I only have a small deposit and would need to either sell or scrap my existing car.

    I'm a woman and don't have any male friends who can help me, so I want to understand if there's any room to negotiate on the price of cars on a forecourt and what sort of things you say to get the price knocked down.

    I'm going to be looking for a car that is suitable for myself and my two young children. I commute about 40 miles in total per day so don't know if petrol or diesel would be better?

    If anyone can recommend any ways to negotiate price, or suggest makes and models of cars I'd appreciate it. I currently have a Skoda Fabia Estate 2003 and would like something slightly smaller.
    Originally posted by first78
    if its not economically viable to continue running your current car, i'd be aiming for a petrol KIA (7 year warranty) or Hyundai (5 year warranty) and get as young a one as you can.

    Best way to get the best price is to look for the particular make / model / fuel type / budget / year and then sort by price within the area you're willing to travel.

    If your're buying a car with the balance of the manufacturers warranty then this removes any reliance on the selling dealer if there are faults down the line.
    You are not special. You are not a beautiful and unique snowflake.
    • Gloomendoom
    • By Gloomendoom 7th Dec 17, 2:15 PM
    • 13,239 Posts
    • 17,456 Thanks
    Gloomendoom
    • #7
    • 7th Dec 17, 2:15 PM
    • #7
    • 7th Dec 17, 2:15 PM
    If your're buying a car with the balance of the manufacturers warranty then this removes any reliance on the selling dealer if there are faults down the line.
    Originally posted by motorguy
    Be careful with this assumption. My wife P/X’d a Kia with a year left on the warranty. It was booked in for a main dealer service but the garage said not to bother as they offered all cars with an RAC warranty which meant that they had to do the service too. This would very probably invalidate the remaining manufacturer’s warranty.
    Advice; it rhymes with mice. Advise; it rhymes with wise.
    • FreddieFrugal
    • By FreddieFrugal 7th Dec 17, 6:41 PM
    • 1,552 Posts
    • 1,645 Thanks
    FreddieFrugal
    • #8
    • 7th Dec 17, 6:41 PM
    • #8
    • 7th Dec 17, 6:41 PM
    40 miles per day is 200 miles/week, less than 10,000/year - so the likelihood of having problems with a modern diesel is high,
    Originally posted by AdrianC
    Not necessarily. My commute is the same - but it's not 40 miles of urban stop start traffic. It's 40 miles on one long stretch of road where the car is moving continuously for speeds in excess of 50mph for half an hour.

    Those conditions are actually pretty good for a diesel. Regardless of the total number of miles.

    Must be as I've paid for nothing more than routine servicing the last 6 years.

    When I bought my car - used - the price difference between it and the same spec with petrol engine were negligible. Practically the same price.

    But I get 60mpg as an average over a year. Wouldn't have got anywhere near that in a petrol equivalent.
    Mortgage remaining: £43,140 of £77,000 (2.59% til 04/18)

    Savings target July 17 - £17,960 / £28,000
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 7th Dec 17, 6:50 PM
    • 15,664 Posts
    • 13,978 Thanks
    AdrianC
    • #9
    • 7th Dec 17, 6:50 PM
    • #9
    • 7th Dec 17, 6:50 PM
    My mother has an 8yo 207 1.6HDi, with just over 50k on it. That's not given any grief, either.

    But we all know the fact is that the LIKELIHOOD is that that kind of use will cause problems...
    • FreddieFrugal
    • By FreddieFrugal 7th Dec 17, 6:55 PM
    • 1,552 Posts
    • 1,645 Thanks
    FreddieFrugal
    But we all know the fact is that the LIKELIHOOD is that that kind of use will cause problems...
    Originally posted by AdrianC
    So if you drive 10,000 miles a year, but those miles are say 95% fast moving open road (as mine are) you're VERY LIKELY to have problems?

    You're VERY LIKELY to have some kind of problem with your car eventually regardless of what driving you do!

    10,000 miles of open road driving are a heck of a lot better than 20,000 miles around town.



    My point Adrian was just to say that the total number of miles alone is not the only thing to consider when choosing an engine.

    If the OP's trips are mostly in town then yes diesel is unsuitable.
    Last edited by FreddieFrugal; 07-12-2017 at 7:02 PM.
    Mortgage remaining: £43,140 of £77,000 (2.59% til 04/18)

    Savings target July 17 - £17,960 / £28,000
    • motorguy
    • By motorguy 7th Dec 17, 9:56 PM
    • 15,785 Posts
    • 9,065 Thanks
    motorguy
    Be careful with this assumption. My wife P/X’d a Kia with a year left on the warranty. It was booked in for a main dealer service but the garage said not to bother as they offered all cars with an RAC warranty which meant that they had to do the service too. This would very probably invalidate the remaining manufacturer’s warranty.
    Originally posted by Gloomendoom
    It would be worth checking the detail yes, however it would be pretty dim of a dealer to negate say, 5 years remaining warranty by overriding the warranty with theirs and not servicing the car as per the manufacturers requirements.
    Last edited by motorguy; 07-12-2017 at 9:59 PM.
    You are not special. You are not a beautiful and unique snowflake.
    • arcon5
    • By arcon5 8th Dec 17, 6:35 AM
    • 13,187 Posts
    • 8,350 Thanks
    arcon5
    I doubt ops looking to go for an aygo or up type car! She's downgrading from an estate not looking to buy a tiny box she can't put kids in
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 8th Dec 17, 8:00 AM
    • 15,664 Posts
    • 13,978 Thanks
    AdrianC
    I doubt ops looking to go for an aygo or up type car! She's downgrading from an estate not looking to buy a tiny box she can't put kids in
    Originally posted by arcon5
    She's wanting to downsize from a Fabia estate. Not exactly a Mondeo.

    The difference between the Fabia hatch and estate is 260mm in length behind the unchanged back doors. The Fabia is a Polo with a Czech badge and a mild restyle, and was launched 18yrs ago, during which time cars have grown, not shrunk.

    There's not much downsizing possible, except to a citycar.
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