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    • LocoLoco
    • By LocoLoco 7th Dec 17, 7:11 AM
    • 157Posts
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    LocoLoco
    Transition from DLA to PIP (child)
    • #1
    • 7th Dec 17, 7:11 AM
    Transition from DLA to PIP (child) 7th Dec 17 at 7:11 AM
    Good morning everyone,

    My son will transition from DLA to PIP when he turns 16 in a few months time. He has complex needs and requires help with most things and from the online descriptors he should get enhanced rate for both categories but I am a little nervous as I've read so many accounts of obviously disabled people having to appeal.

    However, the DWP have recently sent their (very nice) lady out to go through the forms to make me his appointee - does this bode well? I wondered if that means they go through cases and the ones that they assume will transition to PIP receive a visit. Or would someone have been sent out regardless?

    Just wondering if I can take any reassurance from the visit
Page 1
    • poppy12345
    • By poppy12345 7th Dec 17, 7:20 AM
    • 1,768 Posts
    • 1,592 Thanks
    poppy12345
    • #2
    • 7th Dec 17, 7:20 AM
    • #2
    • 7th Dec 17, 7:20 AM
    Good morning everyone,

    My son will transition from DLA to PIP when he turns 16 in a few months time. He has complex needs and requires help with most things and from the online descriptors he should get enhanced rate for both categories but I am a little nervous as I've read so many accounts of obviously disabled people having to appeal.

    However, the DWP have recently sent their (very nice) lady out to go through the forms to make me his appointee - does this bode well? I wondered if that means they go through cases and the ones that they assume will transition to PIP receive a visit. Or would someone have been sent out regardless?

    Just wondering if I can take any reassurance from the visit
    Originally posted by LocoLoco
    Do you mean does becoming his appointee give him an advantage ofbeing awarded PIP? If so then no, it doens't mean anything. Becoming his appointee simply means that you will now be able to make calls to DWP on his behalf, control his money by having any future payments made to your bank account, sign any letters for him, and be responsible for reporting any changes of any benefits he recieves, you'll also be able to speak on his behalf during any face 2 face assessments he may need. Those that have an appointee go through the same procedure as anyone else.

    Most people have an assessment for PIP, it's rare to have a paper based decision. You'll need evidence to support his claim too. Have you started his PIP application yet?
    • LocoLoco
    • By LocoLoco 7th Dec 17, 7:25 AM
    • 157 Posts
    • 200 Thanks
    LocoLoco
    • #3
    • 7th Dec 17, 7:25 AM
    • #3
    • 7th Dec 17, 7:25 AM
    Do you mean does becoming his appointee give him an advantage ofbeing awarded PIP? If so then no, it doens't mean anything. Becoming his appointee simply means that you will now be able to make calls to DWP on his behalf, control his money by having any future payments made to your bank account, sign any letters for him, and be responsible for reporting any changes of any benefits he recieves, you'll also be able to speak on his behalf during any face 2 face assessments he may need. Those that have an appointee go through the same procedure as anyone else.

    Most people have an assessment for PIP, it's rare to have a paper based decision. You'll need evidence to support his claim too. Have you started his PIP application yet?
    Originally posted by poppy12345
    Ah, I see, thank you, yes, I meant does it mean they'd already looked over the file (as it would seem a waste of time to send someone out to organise becoming the appointee if he wasn't going to get the benefit). No, the application hasn't been started yet, we're just waiting on the forms to come through. Thank you for such an informative reply and so quickly, as well Much appreciated.
    • Alice Holt
    • By Alice Holt 7th Dec 17, 9:16 AM
    • 1,583 Posts
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    Alice Holt
    • #4
    • 7th Dec 17, 9:16 AM
    • #4
    • 7th Dec 17, 9:16 AM
    I would suggest seeing if you can get help with the PIP2 form from your local CAB / advice agency.

    Some useful resources:
    https://contact.org.uk/media/1163273/pip_guide.pdf
    https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/benefits/sick-or-disabled-people-and-carers/pip/
    https://www.benefitsandwork.co.uk/personal-independence-payment-pip
    • LocoLoco
    • By LocoLoco 7th Dec 17, 9:58 AM
    • 157 Posts
    • 200 Thanks
    LocoLoco
    • #5
    • 7th Dec 17, 9:58 AM
    • #5
    • 7th Dec 17, 9:58 AM
    Originally posted by Alice Holt
    That's very helpful, Alice Holt, thank you very much
    • fira
    • By fira 8th Dec 17, 2:16 AM
    • 58 Posts
    • 51 Thanks
    fira
    • #6
    • 8th Dec 17, 2:16 AM
    • #6
    • 8th Dec 17, 2:16 AM
    >Or would someone have been sent out regardless?,

    Yes LocoLoco, they would have been and they also would have reviewed DWP information held about your son before coming to see you both.

    A good few years ago I worked in the admin section of a visiting team. Notifications came in almost daily of children on DLA who would soon reach the age of 16. We'd to arrange the appointment usually with the parent, always asking that the child would be present, and then drop it into the visiting officer's diary. They then went out to assess, I suppose using their own usually long experience in the job, if the child would be able to manage their own affairs, or not, at 16yo. If they felt they would not be able to, they completed the DWP appointeeship forms during the visit itself which your VO has done.
    • poppy12345
    • By poppy12345 8th Dec 17, 7:05 AM
    • 1,768 Posts
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    poppy12345
    • #7
    • 8th Dec 17, 7:05 AM
    • #7
    • 8th Dec 17, 7:05 AM
    >Or would someone have been sent out regardless?,

    Yes LocoLoco, they would have been and they also would have reviewed DWP information held about your son before coming to see you both.

    A good few years ago I worked in the admin section of a visiting team. Notifications came in almost daily of children on DLA who would soon reach the age of 16. We'd to arrange the appointment usually with the parent, always asking that the child would be present, and then drop it into the visiting officer's diary. They then went out to assess, I suppose using their own usually long experience in the job, if the child would be able to manage their own affairs, or not, at 16yo. If they felt they would not be able to, they completed the DWP appointeeship forms during the visit itself which your VO has done.
    Originally posted by fira
    That wasn't what the OP question was about though. The OP wanted to know if becoming an appointee for someone would give them an advantage to claiming PIP. Simple answer, no it doesn't.
    • LocoLoco
    • By LocoLoco 8th Dec 17, 11:37 AM
    • 157 Posts
    • 200 Thanks
    LocoLoco
    • #8
    • 8th Dec 17, 11:37 AM
    • #8
    • 8th Dec 17, 11:37 AM
    >Or would someone have been sent out regardless?,

    Yes LocoLoco, they would have been and they also would have reviewed DWP information held about your son before coming to see you both.

    A good few years ago I worked in the admin section of a visiting team. Notifications came in almost daily of children on DLA who would soon reach the age of 16. We'd to arrange the appointment usually with the parent, always asking that the child would be present, and then drop it into the visiting officer's diary. They then went out to assess, I suppose using their own usually long experience in the job, if the child would be able to manage their own affairs, or not, at 16yo. If they felt they would not be able to, they completed the DWP appointeeship forms during the visit itself which your VO has done.
    Originally posted by fira
    Hi Fira, thanks for that, yes, it's that that made me wonder if they'd only do it if they felt it likely that the child would receive adult disability benefits, as it would be a waste of time to appoint an appointee for someone who wasn't in receipt of a benefit. But it seems that's not the case, fingers crossed all will be well anyway, I'm just getting more nervous the closer it gets
    • fira
    • By fira 8th Dec 17, 3:09 PM
    • 58 Posts
    • 51 Thanks
    fira
    • #9
    • 8th Dec 17, 3:09 PM
    • #9
    • 8th Dec 17, 3:09 PM
    >That wasn't what the OP question was about though. The OP wanted to know if becoming an appointee for someone would give them an advantage to claiming PIP. Simple answer, no it doesn't.<

    poppy12345 I answered the question I quoted.There was no need for me to write anything else because both you and Alice had already responded to the other points.
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