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Results: Would you buy a house without a bath?

YES

52.80% • 132 votes

NO

47.20% • 118 votes

You may not vote on this poll

250 votes in total.

  • FIRST POST
    • flameshouse
    • By flameshouse 6th Dec 17, 6:21 PM
    • 6Posts
    • 4Thanks
    flameshouse
    Would you buy a house without a bath??
    • #1
    • 6th Dec 17, 6:21 PM
    Would you buy a house without a bath?? 6th Dec 17 at 6:21 PM
    I have a small 2 bed house with a tiny bathroom, like tiny, the sink overhangs the bath. I'm having the bathroom ripped back to brick and done from scratch, but i'm considering removing the bath and having a large shower cubicle instead... as this is a "first time buyers" kind of house, and thinking about young kids, would removing the bath completely put anyone off/lower the value?
    Last edited by flameshouse; 06-12-2017 at 7:11 PM.
Page 2
    • pinkshoes
    • By pinkshoes 6th Dec 17, 8:40 PM
    • 15,393 Posts
    • 21,016 Thanks
    pinkshoes
    If your house will be marketed to a couple who might have a baby at some point, then a bath is essential.

    Trying to wash toddlers or babies in a shower cubical is a nightmare, and you would need a baby bath - which would need storing somewhere in this small house...
    Should've = Should HAVE (not 'of')
    Would've = Would HAVE (not 'of')

    No, I am not perfect, but yes I do judge people on their use of basic English language. If you didn't know the above, then learn it! (If English is your second language, then you are forgiven!)
    • kerri gt
    • By kerri gt 6th Dec 17, 9:03 PM
    • 6,752 Posts
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    kerri gt
    Not having a bath wouldn't be a deal breaker for a house I loved but it would put me off / be a compromise. I shower most of the time for speed / convenience so a bath is a treat / indulgence and something I enjoy when I have it. That said, I have a friend who's just converted a flat and removed the bath to just have a shower in the process because a) it suits the demographic if she comes to resell b) she hates baths so it made sense for her in the revised layout.
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    • bspm
    • By bspm 6th Dec 17, 9:27 PM
    • 447 Posts
    • 693 Thanks
    bspm
    We have just renovated a bungalow and got rid of the bath, re positioned the bathroom elsewhere and used the original bathroom as part of the kitchen after taking down the wall obviously.

    We had room for a bath in the new sited bathroom but due to the fact that hubby never uses a bath and I find it impossible to get out of one we did not see the point in having another bath put in. We now have an all singing, all dancing fantastic large shower cubicle that can accommodate a shower chair when needed.

    The house has been done for US, if future buyers do require a bath they can install one.
    Last edited by bspm; 06-12-2017 at 9:29 PM.
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 6th Dec 17, 9:39 PM
    • 14,268 Posts
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    moneyistooshorttomention
    Absolutely - one should do the bathroom the way you want yourself.

    In my last house - I ripped the bath out (though it had a shower over it) and put in a large shower cubicle back before it became quite so much "the thing" as it now is. That - despite the fact it was a starter house and so there was a good chance that people who had/anticipated having child/ren would be buying it.

    In the event - I did sell it to someone with a young child - so it hadnt put them off. Their concern seemed to be that the "rival house" to mine they were considering had a sink school nearby, whereas mine had decent schools nearby.
    New Year's Resolution already made -

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    • AlexMac
    • By AlexMac 6th Dec 17, 9:42 PM
    • 1,966 Posts
    • 1,727 Thanks
    AlexMac
    I lost a sale as I'd only put in a shower not a bath. But the prospect was Japanese.
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 6th Dec 17, 9:45 PM
    • 28,657 Posts
    • 72,988 Thanks
    Mojisola
    We had room for a bath in the new sited bathroom but due to the fact that hubby never uses a bath and I find it impossible to get out of one we did not see the point in having another bath put in. We now have an all singing, all dancing fantastic large shower cubicle that can accommodate a shower chair when needed.

    The house has been done for US, if future buyers do require a bath they can install one.
    Originally posted by bspm
    We took the same decision. When we came to revamp the bathroom, none of us could remember when the bath was last used so out it came and there's a lovely big shower cubicle in its place.

    By the time we sell, the new owners will probably want to update the bathroom again and they can put a bath back if they want.
    • Deep In Debt
    • By Deep In Debt 6th Dec 17, 10:11 PM
    • 8,054 Posts
    • 12,452 Thanks
    Deep In Debt
    Not having a bath would put me off. I rarely bath as I much prefer a shower; I have a shower over my bath. A lot of 2 bed houses around my way are owned or rented by families with young kids so I think it would be difficult for me to sell or rent the house without a bath.
    • AnotherJoe
    • By AnotherJoe 6th Dec 17, 10:38 PM
    • 7,681 Posts
    • 8,291 Thanks
    AnotherJoe
    If your house will be marketed to a couple who might have a baby at some point, then a bath is essential.

    Trying to wash toddlers or babies in a shower cubical is a nightmare, and you would need a baby bath - which would need storing somewhere in this small house...
    Originally posted by pinkshoes
    It could be stored in the shower cubicle !
    • do163600
    • By do163600 6th Dec 17, 11:10 PM
    • 30 Posts
    • 30 Thanks
    do163600
    I bought my current house without a bath. The previous owners had refitted the bathroom with just a shower cubicle, as it is a small room.

    It didn't bother me, as I don't have baths.

    When my partner moved in, she kept asking me to fit a bath, as she likes to have a soak.

    About 12 months ago, I finally got around to having the bathroom refitted, complete with bath. It took some searching for a suitable suite that would fit the available space.

    We are thinking of moving within the next year, so I figured it would probably make the house more appealing to the family market.
    • Carrot007
    • By Carrot007 7th Dec 17, 1:43 AM
    • 761 Posts
    • 627 Thanks
    Carrot007
    Bath over shower here too.

    If there wasn't a bath I'd deduct the cost of refitting the bathroom from any offer.
    Originally posted by IAmWales
    I could remove a shower cubile and fit a bath from around £300. It's a simple job.

    And I will do if I ever sell this house and it proves an issue.e

    A bath with a shower is a crap shower.

    I was going to do it in my previous house but was worried like people say here. It ended up with a £300 B&Q suite and a shower over the bath. I never used the bath. The shower was a pain and you have to be too careful when you are not in a proper cubicle.

    When I moved there was a bath/sink/shower in a fitted by an idiot wet room. I decided BIG shiower cubile and sink/toilet was much more use to me. Who wants to go downstairs to a toilet at night? Might have got away with a bath too, but the shower cubile would have been tiny and it would have been a cramped room. Tons of space as is. And as said. It ain't hard to remove a shower cubile and put a bath in if I had to.
    • seven-day-weekend
    • By seven-day-weekend 7th Dec 17, 3:13 AM
    • 29,858 Posts
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    seven-day-weekend
    We sold a house without a bath (although there was room for one) to a young family.

    We then bought a bungalow without a bath (although there was room for one) . We have a lovely big shower instead.

    So my answer is obviously yes!!
    To love someone is to learn the song in their heart and to sing it to them when they have forgotten it
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    • tealady
    • By tealady 7th Dec 17, 5:39 AM
    • 2,742 Posts
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    tealady
    I dislike bath (the thought of sitting my own dirt yuk!)
    Also I am on a water meter (my choice)
    Thirdly I have a lovely double shower so loads of room to move and wash hair.
    Also a shower is so much easier to clean.
    When a "friend" suggested it might make selling my house harder without a bath I pointed out as this is (hopefully) my forever home I will have what I damm well want!
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    • michelle09
    • By michelle09 7th Dec 17, 6:24 AM
    • 471 Posts
    • 1,893 Thanks
    michelle09
    We bought a house with a bath and took it out. Yes, it may be harder to sell, but we don't intend to sell for 10 years minimum. I'd rather have a decade of what I want and worry about that when it comes to selling rather than putting up with something in my own house for most of my life.

    As it happens, I currently have a broken foot and a shower/bath would probably be more convenient but climbing 2 flights of stairs to bed is far more annoying!
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 7th Dec 17, 6:50 AM
    • 30,858 Posts
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    getmore4less
    if you take out the bath make sure you have a baby washing sized sink

    When space is tight and still want a bath look at compact toilets and sinks.

    short projection toilets are available under 600mm seen 570mm

    More cloakroom, you can get toilet units with sink above that saves space.

    maybe put up the floorplan there are a few here that are good at coming up with ideas.

    are you prepared to move plumbing main one being the soil pipe

    if you want to spend a bit more could you nick a bit from somewhere to make it bigger, might not be worth moving a wall.


    edit : see there are more options for combined than last time I looked
    Manhattan All In One Toilet and Basin has a 640 projection with sink which is compact.

    also seen this neat offset design making the sink more usable.

    Last edited by getmore4less; 07-12-2017 at 7:24 AM.
    • kates08
    • By kates08 7th Dec 17, 6:54 AM
    • 51 Posts
    • 26 Thanks
    kates08
    We redid our bathroom last year knowing we were going to put it on the market sometime soon so put in an L shaped shower-bath. It doesn't really work as a bath as it takes more than the tank of hot water to fill it. I have had one bath in 18 months and that was after doing a 25 mile walk for charity.

    Were now moving and will be redoing the bathroom with a walk in shower instead as we will be staying there long term.
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 7th Dec 17, 7:31 AM
    • 14,268 Posts
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    moneyistooshorttomention
    if you take out the bath make sure you have a baby washing sized sink
    Originally posted by getmore4less
    That thought literally never occurred to me - but I have a huge sink in my kitchen now that I've re-done it. I just find it handy for me - as I can stand things in the sink to the side of the washing-up bowl.

    But that is a very good point - if ever I do sell the house (ie that it is big enough for that). Thanks for that.
    New Year's Resolution already made -

    Don't get mad....get firm ...
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 7th Dec 17, 7:39 AM
    • 30,858 Posts
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    getmore4less
    That thought literally never occurred to me - but I have a huge sink in my kitchen now that I've re-done it. I just find it handy for me - as I can stand things in the sink to the side of the washing-up bowl.

    But that is a very good point - if ever I do sell the house (ie that it is big enough for that). Thanks for that.
    Originally posted by moneyistooshorttomention
    No point kneeling and stooping over a bath and getting a bad back when you have a perfect baby sized sink or wash basin in the house.
    • csgohan4
    • By csgohan4 7th Dec 17, 7:53 AM
    • 4,021 Posts
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    csgohan4
    No point kneeling and stooping over a bath and getting a bad back when you have a perfect baby sized sink or wash basin in the house.
    Originally posted by getmore4less


    just imagining someone washing their baby in the kitchen sink, I suppose it is big enough, but not sure it would appreciate Fairy liquid over baby shampoo
    "It is prudent when shopping for something important, not to limit yourself to Pound land"
    • n217970
    • By n217970 7th Dec 17, 8:06 AM
    • 244 Posts
    • 180 Thanks
    n217970
    I would quite happily buy one without a bath, but I wouldn't sell one without a bath. I am a big fan of the short P or L baths were space is at a premium.
    • AndyBSG
    • By AndyBSG 7th Dec 17, 10:08 AM
    • 937 Posts
    • 1,143 Thanks
    AndyBSG
    I'd buy a flat without a bath but not a house.
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