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    • MSE Callum
    • By MSE Callum 6th Dec 17, 10:20 AM
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    MSE Callum
    MSE News: One in seven worry about money 'every day' during the run-up to Christmas
    • #1
    • 6th Dec 17, 10:20 AM
    MSE News: One in seven worry about money 'every day' during the run-up to Christmas 6th Dec 17 at 10:20 AM
    Households are facing increasing financial pressures over the Christmas period, a new poll reveals today, with more people regularly worrying about money and more turning to credit to pay for festive food and presents...
    Read the full story:
    'One in seven worry about money 'every day' during the run-up to Christmas'

    Click reply below to discuss. If you havenít already, join the forum to reply.
    Last edited by MSE Luke; 11-12-2017 at 11:41 AM.
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Page 1
    • enthusiasticsaver
    • By enthusiasticsaver 6th Dec 17, 11:18 AM
    • 4,851 Posts
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    enthusiasticsaver
    • #2
    • 6th Dec 17, 11:18 AM
    • #2
    • 6th Dec 17, 11:18 AM
    There is too much pressure on people to feel they have to spend lots to have a nice Christmas. I think cutting back hard on who you buy presents for, not overdoing the food and drink and resisting the urge to accept every party invite going makes Christmas a much more peaceful and worry free time.
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    • tara747
    • By tara747 6th Dec 17, 4:42 PM
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    • #3
    • 6th Dec 17, 4:42 PM
    • #3
    • 6th Dec 17, 4:42 PM
    Exactly. It's disturbing to see how much is spent on Christmas, especially by those who can't afford what they're buying. Christmas should not get people into debt.
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    • Arleen
    • By Arleen 6th Dec 17, 4:49 PM
    • 1,038 Posts
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    • #4
    • 6th Dec 17, 4:49 PM
    • #4
    • 6th Dec 17, 4:49 PM
    Can always celebrate festivus instead https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Festivus
    • Caddyman
    • By Caddyman 6th Dec 17, 6:18 PM
    • 277 Posts
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    Caddyman
    • #5
    • 6th Dec 17, 6:18 PM
    • #5
    • 6th Dec 17, 6:18 PM
    Echo the points made already.

    People get themselves into debt at Christmas because often they feel utterly obligated to please others. As a society, we've trodden the most bizarre materialistic path that can cause the most unbelievable financial pain for many. People need to stop and think about what they're doing when it comes to bestowing gifts on others because they feel that somehow it's the right thing to do and because it's considered by many as 'expected'

    Many years ago, I and my Wife quite literally stuck two fingers up to exchanging presents and sending cards. It became pointless, but more importantly, we discovered the people who weren't worth having as friends in the first place because the moment we stopped giving Christmas gifts, they made it perfectly clear they weren't at all happy about it. We actually have a wonderful Christmas every year now, even many members of our own families have followed our lead.

    We're not anti-Christmas in any way, my Wife and I still exchange a gift on Christmas Day, but what we're not prepared to do, is spend money on others, and that includes the very closest members of our family, and leave ourselves in financial stress, nor do we feel remotely 'guilty' for not spending to please others. We now save enough money over the Christmas period, to allow ourselves to take a winter sun holiday in January whilst others are struggling with their finances. We can at least, can go into the New Year debt free, every year.
    • phillw
    • By phillw 10th Dec 17, 12:14 PM
    • 1,041 Posts
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    phillw
    • #6
    • 10th Dec 17, 12:14 PM
    • #6
    • 10th Dec 17, 12:14 PM
    Many years ago, I and my Wife quite literally stuck two fingers up to exchanging presents and sending cards. It became pointless, but more importantly, we discovered the people who weren't worth having as friends in the first place because the moment we stopped giving Christmas gifts, they made it perfectly clear they weren't at all happy about it. We actually have a wonderful Christmas every year now, even many members of our own families have followed our lead.
    Originally posted by Caddyman
    Years ago my mum and dad said they "weren't buying presents this year", my mum was then disappointed on xmas day when she produced a present and dad hadn't. My dad stopped believing her.

    IMO where it goes wrong is if you just throw money at the problem and don't think about where the money is coming from and also whether there is something cheaper but more meaningful you can buy/do instead. One year my dad couldn't afford presents and he made them instead.
    • sourcrates
    • By sourcrates 10th Dec 17, 2:09 PM
    • 12,691 Posts
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    • #7
    • 10th Dec 17, 2:09 PM
    • #7
    • 10th Dec 17, 2:09 PM
    Myself, and my ex wife dont use credit anymore, we have 3 kids, and only buy them whats affordable from our combined wages.

    We got into terrible bother with debt a few years ago, which i have documented and commented on previously, not all to do with Christmas granted, but credit cards used to fund it, never again, on another tangent, was reading a post yesterday, some guy wanting to borrow 20 grand for a wedding, ugh........cringe worthy.
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    • datlex
    • By datlex 10th Dec 17, 2:48 PM
    • 1,455 Posts
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    datlex
    • #8
    • 10th Dec 17, 2:48 PM
    • #8
    • 10th Dec 17, 2:48 PM
    Echo the points made already.

    People get themselves into debt at Christmas because often they feel utterly obligated to please others. As a society, we've trodden the most bizarre materialistic path that can cause the most unbelievable financial pain for many. People need to stop and think about what they're doing when it comes to bestowing gifts on others because they feel that somehow it's the right thing to do and because it's considered by many as 'expected'

    Many years ago, I and my Wife quite literally stuck two fingers up to exchanging presents and sending cards. It became pointless, but more importantly, we discovered the people who weren't worth having as friends in the first place because the moment we stopped giving Christmas gifts, they made it perfectly clear they weren't at all happy about it. We actually have a wonderful Christmas every year now, even many members of our own families have followed our lead.

    We're not anti-Christmas in any way, my Wife and I still exchange a gift on Christmas Day, but what we're not prepared to do, is spend money on others, and that includes the very closest members of our family, and leave ourselves in financial stress, nor do we feel remotely 'guilty' for not spending to please others. We now save enough money over the Christmas period, to allow ourselves to take a winter sun holiday in January whilst others are struggling with their finances. We can at least, can go into the New Year debt free, every year.
    Originally posted by Caddyman
    Of course you can do token or presents sourced without spending e.g. a top from Tesco using clubcard
    • FBaby
    • By FBaby 11th Dec 17, 7:56 AM
    • 16,129 Posts
    • 40,035 Thanks
    FBaby
    • #9
    • 11th Dec 17, 7:56 AM
    • #9
    • 11th Dec 17, 7:56 AM
    The only time I have enjoyed Christmas has been when I was a kid and still believe in Father Christmas and when my kids did too. That's the only magic that I can understand, everything else passes me by!

    I go and do my weekly shopping and see those boxed presents and all I can think of is 'do women really get excited when they open one up to see a collection of Dove shampoo, shower gel and soap'? Do men really get a buzz because they got a hair nose remover?

    I don't even get the over excitment of the Xmas meal. Yes it is nice, but surely nowadays, we could eat that same meal at any time in the year if we really wanted to?

    Xmas lost its magic since we've been able to afford (even if by credit) all those things at any other time of the year. What made it special was when it was the only time that you could really enjoy those things.

    I would so much rather spend my money in getting things for people who genuinely need them but it's hard to know people who are experiencing true hardship rather than hardship through poor budgeting ie. who might need a new washing machine but can't afford it because they bought their kids the latest i-phone or signed up to the biggest sky package.
    • Cicatriz
    • By Cicatriz 12th Dec 17, 4:56 PM
    • 13 Posts
    • 15 Thanks
    Cicatriz

    I don't even get the over excitment of the Xmas meal. Yes it is nice, but surely nowadays, we could eat that same meal at any time in the year if we really wanted to?

    Xmas lost its magic since we've been able to afford (even if by credit) all those things at any other time of the year. What made it special was when it was the only time that you could really enjoy those things.
    Originally posted by FBaby
    I think this drives over the top Christmas consumerism and intensity. When it's possible to do these things all year round and when people purchase what they want, never mind need, all year round it becomes necessary to make Christmas even more extravagent. There's probably a formula in there somewhere, everyday consumerism * 10 or something.
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 12th Dec 17, 5:05 PM
    • 60,988 Posts
    • 356,232 Thanks
    PasturesNew
    Sounds like words put into people's mouths.
    I'm sure many DO worry every day about it .... but if you ask people if they worry then they'll probably say "yes", especially if the questioning is intended to "prove" everybody's worrying.

    I'm more worried by the fact that everybody's in a perpetual state of worry! About everything!
    • EssexHebridean
    • By EssexHebridean 13th Dec 17, 10:17 AM
    • 8,234 Posts
    • 43,599 Thanks
    EssexHebridean
    Absolutely unsurprised that it's become such an issue. TV has played a part in my opinion - we now have a culture where nobody thinks it unusual to see ads in September promoting "get a new Sofa in time for Christmas" and more running from October onwards suggesting to our kids all the things that are "must haves" - often items at a ludicrous cost for the average family. Add to that the problem that budgeting as a skill has been largely lost and is rarely taught to children at home any more, and that credit is so readily available and socially acceptable, and you have a recipe for disaster.

    MrEH and I no longer do birthday or Christmas cards for each other as it seems pointless. Within my family we have also for years adopted a "Christmas list" approach where the items on the list are often "needs" not wants - the idea being that this then frees up the receiver's personal spending money to treat themselves to "wants" as they arise and are decided on. Sometimes it also means that people get a better version of something than they would be able to justify for themselves - for example I love Clinique mascara but always ask for it as a present as lovely as it is I'm not going to spend that money on it myself. This works well.

    We also save an amount each month to cover christmas spending and then everything spent comes from this sum - this saves the panic of December being an expensive month.
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