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    • linda1949
    • By linda1949 4th Dec 17, 10:18 PM
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    linda1949
    Linda1949
    • #1
    • 4th Dec 17, 10:18 PM
    Linda1949 4th Dec 17 at 10:18 PM
    I have paid national insurance since I was 16. For a few years I paid the small married women's stamp and do not receive the full state pension because of this. I feel this is very unfair as I get around £40 less a week than the full state pension. Is this correct or should I be getting full state pension. Have been retired for 9 years and this has always bugged me!!
Page 1
    • ermine
    • By ermine 4th Dec 17, 10:23 PM
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    ermine
    • #2
    • 4th Dec 17, 10:23 PM
    • #2
    • 4th Dec 17, 10:23 PM
    I have paid national insurance since I was 16. For a few years I paid the small married women's stamp and do not receive the full state pension because of this. I feel this is very unfair as I get around £40 less a week than the full state pension.
    Originally posted by linda1949
    Why do you feel this is unfair? You paid less NI, this is the government's position on the subject. It would be unfair if you paid less NI than someone else and you got the same amount of pension as they did, don't you think?

    This topic has been aired before on here.
    Last edited by ermine; 04-12-2017 at 10:26 PM.
    • enthusiasticsaver
    • By enthusiasticsaver 4th Dec 17, 10:34 PM
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    enthusiasticsaver
    • #3
    • 4th Dec 17, 10:34 PM
    • #3
    • 4th Dec 17, 10:34 PM
    The married womens rate was 5.75% I believe instead of the full 12% so presumably you were aware that this would affect your pension in later life? Exactly how many years were you paying the reduced rate for and how many years did you pay full NI?
    1 week to go until early retirement. Debt free and mortgage free.

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    • swindiff
    • By swindiff 5th Dec 17, 8:13 AM
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    • #4
    • 5th Dec 17, 8:13 AM
    • #4
    • 5th Dec 17, 8:13 AM
    Pay less in, get less out. Seems a pretty fair system to me
    • Jerben
    • By Jerben 5th Dec 17, 9:54 AM
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    Jerben
    • #5
    • 5th Dec 17, 9:54 AM
    • #5
    • 5th Dec 17, 9:54 AM
    I get around £40 less a week than the full state pension.
    Originally posted by linda1949
    How much do you actually receive?
    • Silvertabby
    • By Silvertabby 5th Dec 17, 10:02 AM
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    Silvertabby
    • #6
    • 5th Dec 17, 10:02 AM
    • #6
    • 5th Dec 17, 10:02 AM
    “ I get around £40 less a week than the full state pension.
    I won't get the full State pension (in 2021) either, as I paid reduced NI due to being contracted out.

    However, you have had your pension from 60, whereas my State pension age will now be 66 - so you're already ahead of me.

    N.B.

    Before anyone kicks off, I'm NOT complaining about my lot as I'm MUCH better off with my contracted out pensions and reduced State pension than I would have been with just the full State pension - and I fully support the equalisation of State pension ages. I'm just pointing out that anyone who has been receiving a State pension from age 60 isn't necessarily hard done by.
    • Pollycat
    • By Pollycat 5th Dec 17, 10:14 AM
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    • #7
    • 5th Dec 17, 10:14 AM
    • #7
    • 5th Dec 17, 10:14 AM
    I won't get the full State pension (in 2021) either, as I paid reduced NI due to being contracted out.

    However, you have had your pension from 60, whereas my State pension age will now be 66 - so you're already ahead of me.

    N.B.

    Before anyone kicks off, I'm NOT complaining about my lot as I'm MUCH better off with my contracted out pensions and reduced State pension than I would have been with just the full State pension - and I fully support the equalisation of State pension ages. I'm just pointing out that anyone who has been receiving a State pension from age 60 isn't necessarily hard done by.
    Originally posted by Silvertabby
    I almost wrote exactly the same, Sivertabby, but we only need 35 qualifying years & I think it might have been 39(?) when the OP retired.
    • Silvertabby
    • By Silvertabby 5th Dec 17, 10:24 AM
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    • #8
    • 5th Dec 17, 10:24 AM
    • #8
    • 5th Dec 17, 10:24 AM
    I almost wrote exactly the same, Sivertabby, but we only need 35 qualifying years & I think it might have been 39(?) when the OP retired. Posted by Pollycat
    True, I'd forgotten about that.

    Back to the 'married woman's stamp' - I remember my aunt saying that her pension was just a few pounds because she had paid the 'little stamp'. She didn't complain about it as she knew it had been her choice - the paperwork she had completed clearly said that if she opted not to pay full NI, then she would not get a full State pension in her own right. However, at the time, it was either the full stamp or the mortgage.

    My mum, bless her, was of another opinion. She only ever saw 'the money in her purse' and never considered the long term options of her decisions. When I got married in the early 1990s she was adamant that 'I should get my money back from the Government' and was most put out when I said that: A. That was no longer an option, and B. That I would have opted to pay the full stamp anyway.
    Last edited by Silvertabby; 05-12-2017 at 10:28 AM.
    • dunroving
    • By dunroving 5th Dec 17, 10:42 AM
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    dunroving
    • #9
    • 5th Dec 17, 10:42 AM
    • #9
    • 5th Dec 17, 10:42 AM
    Pay less in, get less out. Seems a pretty fair system to me
    Originally posted by swindiff
    The problem is, there are plenty of exceptions to this seemingly logical principle when it comes to NI and state pension.
    • Malthusian
    • By Malthusian 5th Dec 17, 11:39 AM
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    Malthusian
    The problem is, there are plenty of exceptions to this seemingly logical principle when it comes to NI and state pension.
    Originally posted by dunroving
    Well, yes - the most obvious being that NI is a tax, and if you earn more you pay more in but don't get more State Pension (since the abolition of SSP / SERPS).

    The difference between that and the OP's situation is that she chose to pay less in knowing that she would get less out; whereas a high earner doesn't have the choice to pay less in (except by earning less money.)
    • kidmugsy
    • By kidmugsy 5th Dec 17, 1:40 PM
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    kidmugsy
    we only need 35 qualifying years & I think it might have been 39(?) when the OP retired.
    Originally posted by Pollycat
    It was 44 for me for most of my working life. I managed 45. By that time the ever-extravagant Gordon Brown had cut it to 30. Was my surplus of 15 years then passed to my wife? Of course not!

    It's sooooooo unfair.
    Free the dunston one next time too.
    • linda1949
    • By linda1949 5th Dec 17, 7:37 PM
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    linda1949
    Thanks everyone for their replies. However I don't remember being told it would affect my pension and my husband was paying his NI and the pension included his contributions. Maybe I got it wrong, but I thought your husband's contributions counted at the time you had children and had to work part time (hence I paid the "small" stamp!
    • xylophone
    • By xylophone 5th Dec 17, 8:00 PM
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    xylophone
    Thanks everyone for their replies. However I don't remember being told it would affect my pension and my husband was paying his NI and the pension included his contributions. Maybe I got it wrong, but I thought your husband's contributions counted at the time you had children and had to work part time (hence I paid the "small" stamp!


    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/money/special-reports/the-married-women-getting-30p-a-week-pension---despite-50-years/


    It dramatically reduced the state pension they were qualified to receive independently of their husbands, as well as removing their right to receive maternity and unemployment benefit.

    Instead they would receive 60pc of their husband's state pension allowance when he reached his retirement age.


    http://www.britishpensions.org.au/Home-responsibilities.htm
    • greenglide
    • By greenglide 5th Dec 17, 8:52 PM
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    greenglide
    But of course was a long time ago when married women were expected to only work for a year or two before leaving to have children and then we're not expected to return to work.

    Since it also required 40 years or so of contributions to get the full pension the assumption was generally that a woman's pension would almost always use the husband's contributions (60% ?).

    So for a lot of people it did make sense but the world change and women worked for much longer and the small stamp wasn't suitable.

    Many years ago when the small stamp was stopped except for existing elections the government of the time should have stopped it completely but that would have been too sensible.
    • Silvertabby
    • By Silvertabby 5th Dec 17, 9:14 PM
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    Silvertabby
    Many years ago when the small stamp was stopped except for existing elections the government of the time should have stopped it completely but that would have been too sensible. Posted by greenglide
    Exactly. However, it was 1977 and the then Labour Government probably thought it would be too much of a vote loser if they stopped it completely.

    I remember when I first started work in the early 1970s - and a couple of married ladies thought it was hilarious that they paid much less NI than us singlies. An older single lady did point out that they would get peanuts for their State pension - but they didn't seem to care. All they could see was the extra few pounds in their wages then.
    • atush
    • By atush 5th Dec 17, 9:19 PM
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    atush
    Linda, do also think about your user name here and elsewhere.

    Saying your name and DOB can be too much information for strangers
    • kidmugsy
    • By kidmugsy 5th Dec 17, 9:22 PM
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    kidmugsy
    they didn't seem to care. All they could see was the extra few pounds in their wages then.
    Originally posted by Silvertabby
    I dare say they assumed that the taxpayer would still stump up if they were short of cash in old age. I suppose they proved to be right, did they?
    Free the dunston one next time too.
    • westv
    • By westv 5th Dec 17, 10:47 PM
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    westv
    This thread must have one of the vaguest titles on MSE forums.
    • ermine
    • By ermine 5th Dec 17, 11:33 PM
    • 623 Posts
    • 924 Thanks
    ermine
    However I don't remember being told it would affect my pension and my husband was paying his NI and the pension included his contributions. Maybe I got it wrong, but I thought your husband's contributions counted at the time you had children and had to work part time (hence I paid the "small" stamp!
    Originally posted by linda1949
    It's not unheard of for amnesia to apply to disadvantageous news. Often we don't hear what we don't want to hear...

    It may be worth investigating whether you had Home Responsibilities Protection, but you still need 20 years of real NI contributions.
    • ffacoffipawb
    • By ffacoffipawb 6th Dec 17, 5:29 AM
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    ffacoffipawb
    It's not unheard of for amnesia to apply to disadvantageous news. Often we don't hear what we don't want to hear...
    Originally posted by ermine
    e.g. WASPIE
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