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  • FIRST POST
    • SamsReturn
    • By SamsReturn 4th Dec 17, 1:01 PM
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    SamsReturn
    Do you think you could pass a driving test ?
    • #1
    • 4th Dec 17, 1:01 PM
    Do you think you could pass a driving test ? 4th Dec 17 at 1:01 PM
    If you had to take your driving test again, today, do you think you'd pass it ?
    The driving test will change from Monday 4 December 2017 to include following directions from a sat nav and testing different manoeuvres.
    https://www.gov.uk/government/news/driving-test-changes-4-december-2017

    I don't think i'd pass. I was watching the girl on Bbc Breakfast doing a 'pretend test' (she failed), and you need to know what all the switches & buttons on the dash are for, i can never remember some of the ones i never need to use. Then another change is, you have to follow instructions from the SatNav. I haven't got one. My car is a 05 reg, so it's not old, but hasn't a factory fitted Sat, and i only ever drive local, so i've never bothered to get one.
    I think i feel sorry for learners today.
Page 2
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 5th Dec 17, 8:13 AM
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    PasturesNew
    What about fog lights? Or full beam headlights?
    Originally posted by Pyxis
    I've never used/had fog lights ..... it'd not occur to me that my car had them....in fact, does it? No idea. That's going to bug me and I'm probably going to google it at some point.

    Full beam are rarely used; I don't go out after dark as a rule.

    Not being snarky, or picking you out, but I wonder how many of us really could.
    There's a good case for a driving assessment every few years I reckon.
    For everyone who drives.
    I hate the idea of yet more rules, but some of the driving you see.
    Originally posted by Jackmydad
    Well, in 40 years of driving I've not had an accident ...yet.

    Seen loads in my rear mirror! Glad I'm in front of that lot
    Last edited by PasturesNew; 05-12-2017 at 8:16 AM.
    • indesisiv
    • By indesisiv 5th Dec 17, 8:16 AM
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    indesisiv
    I've never used/had fog lights ..... it'd not occur to me that my car had them....in fact, does it? No idea.

    Full beam are rarely used; I don't go out after dark as a rule.
    Originally posted by PasturesNew
    I suspect that 99% of all cars have them!
    Although the car I have now is the first one that has had front fog lights too.
    Fog lights are not for after dark, they are for dense fog.
    “Time is intended to be spent, not saved” - Alfred Wainwright
    • Nick_C
    • By Nick_C 5th Dec 17, 10:09 AM
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    Nick_C
    Fog lights are not for after dark, they are for dense fog.
    Originally posted by indesisiv
    And sometimes for dense drivers.
    • Gloomendoom
    • By Gloomendoom 5th Dec 17, 10:25 AM
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    Gloomendoom
    As for all the dashboard stuff I would not have a clue, isn't that just a memory test then? The other week a warning light came on my car that I didn't know what it was for so I googled it and it was just tyre pressure.
    Originally posted by AubreyMac
    Just tyre pressure?

    Nothing important then.
    Advice; it rhymes with mice. Advise; it rhymes with wise.
    • Gavin83
    • By Gavin83 5th Dec 17, 10:36 AM
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    Gavin83
    I could not pass my test tomorrow, but if I could have two hours of lessons to brush up on what I need to know, then I am confident that I should pass.
    Originally posted by JIL
    I agree with this. The standard of my driving is generally good but I'd need a few hours to brush up on the weird requirements of a driving test. There are several ways you have to drive in a test that no one uses on real life.

    I took my test just as the hazard perception came in (I was one of the first to do it) so I've taken a modern driving test. I think older drivers might struggle a bit more.

    There's a good case for a driving assessment every few years I reckon.
    For everyone who drives.
    I hate the idea of yet more rules, but some of the driving you see.
    Originally posted by Jackmydad
    I think the issue is a lot of these drivers drive like this out of choice. On a driving test they'd be on their best behaviour.
    • OldMotherTucker
    • By OldMotherTucker 5th Dec 17, 10:54 AM
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    OldMotherTucker
    I agree with this. The standard of my driving is generally good but I'd need a few hours to brush up on the weird requirements of a driving test. There are several ways you have to drive in a test that no one uses on real life.

    I took my test just as the hazard perception came in (I was one of the first to do it) so I've taken a modern driving test. I think older drivers might struggle a bit more.



    I think the issue is a lot of these drivers drive like this out of choice. On a driving test they'd be on their best behaviour.
    Originally posted by Gavin83
    Like reversing round a corner at a junction!! Who in right mind would do that?
    Should have joined Borrowmydoggy.com
    • Nick_C
    • By Nick_C 5th Dec 17, 11:46 AM
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    Nick_C
    Like reversing round a corner at a junction!! Who in right mind would do that?
    Originally posted by OldMotherTucker
    I haven't reversed around a corner since my test, but obviously the skill is about being able to safely and accurately manoeuvre the vehicle. It is a skill that all drivers should be using on a regular basis to reverse into parking spaces or private driveways. It is also a skill that many seem to lack, as they routinely adopt the more dangerous practice of reversing out of parking spaces, or out of private drives onto main roads!
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 5th Dec 17, 11:53 AM
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    PasturesNew
    I reverse round a LOT of corners. If I'm driving along and want to turn round I've two options: Do a U-turn in a wide entrance of a right hand turn (or pull in and drive round randomly looking for somewhere to turn) -or- pull over to the left and reverse round a left hand corner that looks doable.

    I'm not talking about major roads/huge traffic here, just "regular residential roads" ... for a major road I'd turn right and then find somewhere down that road to turn round, then come back to the junction and turn left.

    If you're in places you don't know and are "looking for where you wanted" then you often drive past it and spot it, requiring you to turn round and often reversing round a corner is easiest/nearest.

    Reversing into parking bays is similar to "reversing round a corner" quite often, too. I have to "reverse round two corners" to park at home, doing a full U-turn to get into my parking spot.

    The "skill" of the action is about controlling the front and back and keeping a parallel line to the kerb, so you're doing it neatly and not "all over the place and faffing about".
    • Nick_C
    • By Nick_C 5th Dec 17, 12:45 PM
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    Nick_C
    I think they have replaced reversing round a corner with reversing into a parking bay.
    Originally posted by Pyxis
    I don't see that as improvement. There aren't so many parking bays of that type on public roads. Perhaps they will do it at the test centre? And the new task is either reversing in or reversing out!

    In addition, if I drove forwards onto my drive, I'd never get out again, because I can't see who is on the pavement due to a neighbour's wall and hedge!
    Originally posted by Pyxis
    Glad to hear that. But many just put their hazard lights on and reverse out blind!
    • AubreyMac
    • By AubreyMac 5th Dec 17, 1:25 PM
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    AubreyMac
    Just tyre pressure?

    Nothing important then.
    Originally posted by Gloomendoom
    Yeah, I stopped by the road to google what the symbol meant as I worried it was something v serious that could be extremely dangerous to carry on with my short journey.


    I have one of those inflators that you plug into cigarette thing in car. It had never been used before.


    This is where youtube came in handy - I watched vids on where to check for psi (inside petrol door - I always thought it was on the wheel) and how to set up and use the inflator then reset/register this with the car which turned off the symbol. Job done.


    with my previous car I also used youtube to find out how to open bonnet (this was not obvious with a ford focus), change wipers and change wheel.


    These might be basic things or things that people find obvious/easy but if they are also things I just didn't know.
    • Nick_C
    • By Nick_C 5th Dec 17, 1:29 PM
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    Nick_C
    They are also incorporating parallel parking, I believe.

    That should be fun!
    Originally posted by Pyxis
    Parallel parking has been in the test for a long time
    • Jackmydad
    • By Jackmydad 5th Dec 17, 3:24 PM
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    Jackmydad
    I don't have a tyre pressure warning light.

    I have to check mine manually.
    Originally posted by Pyxis
    Which we all should do anyway. Tyre pressure indicator light or not. The light often works on the rolling radius of the wheel. So it can get pretty flat before it puts the light on.
    As you know, being a "good driver" is more than just driving. Regular checks underbonnet, as well as tyres, lights and glass cleanliness, as well as a general look round to see nothing is falling off are all part of it.

    If I sound a bit fussy, I try to be. I don't want to drive around in a car with one headlight out, and just the wiper zones to see out of. Too many don't seem to care.
    • NBLondon
    • By NBLondon 5th Dec 17, 3:37 PM
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    NBLondon
    I'd say 50:50 as to whether I'd pass if I just turned up and had a go. I'd do a bit of a revision of the HC and maybe a quick refresher. I don't quite see the following a sat nav idea - what if the car you take your test in isn't fitted with one? As said above, the test is can you a) follow it if needed and b) ignore it when appropriate (e.g. the one in my car thinks I can drive through a precinct that has been pedestrianised since the 1970s).
    I know where all the essential controls in my car are. I would have to think for a second if you asked me to suddenly point out where to override the auto start-stop but that's a task to be done while stopped and able to grab the manual if needed. I hope the point is to catch e.g. those who have only ever had lessons in daylight and good weather and have no idea where or when to use the fogs.
    I sort of agree with PasturesNew - reversing into a side road or entry way to turn round is a useful skill.
    This Be the Verse - Philip Larkin. The first line that everyone knows.
    • AubreyMac
    • By AubreyMac 5th Dec 17, 4:38 PM
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    AubreyMac
    Which we all should do anyway. Tyre pressure indicator light or not. The light often works on the rolling radius of the wheel. So it can get pretty flat before it puts the light on.
    As you know, being a "good driver" is more than just driving. Regular checks underbonnet, as well as tyres, lights and glass cleanliness, as well as a general look round to see nothing is falling off are all part of it.

    If I sound a bit fussy, I try to be. I don't want to drive around in a car with one headlight out, and just the wiper zones to see out of. Too many don't seem to care.
    Originally posted by Jackmydad

    I wouldn't know how to check tyre pressure manually apart jabbing the tyre with my thumb to make sure it feels 'firm' is that what you mean?


    When I was shopping for a 2nd hand car I learnt (again by googling and youtube) some very basic stuff to check such as dipstick where on the makers things should be and even what colour too. Though I have forgotten all that now but do a quick liquid top up before MOT's.


    As for under the bonnet I would not have a clue on what things should look like etc.


    most of what I know (and found out online) only happens when I need to know, I would imagine that's how most people learn.
    • Jackmydad
    • By Jackmydad 5th Dec 17, 5:14 PM
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    Jackmydad
    I wouldn't know how to check tyre pressure manually apart jabbing the tyre with my thumb to make sure it feels 'firm' is that what you mean?


    When I was shopping for a 2nd hand car I learnt (again by googling and youtube) some very basic stuff to check such as dipstick where on the makers things should be and even what colour too. Though I have forgotten all that now but do a quick liquid top up before MOT's.


    As for under the bonnet I would not have a clue on what things should look like etc.


    most of what I know (and found out online) only happens when I need to know, I would imagine that's how most people learn.
    Originally posted by AubreyMac
    All due respect, and not "having a go" but you should know how to do these things.
    It's all in the manual, and a tyre pressure gauge isn't expensive.
    Apart from the a fact that checking the oil and other fluid levels under the bonnet could save you a lot of money, tyres wear better when they are correctly inflated.
    They are also a lot safer. If you have a serious accident, and tyre pressures were checked then, you could be in trouble if they were underinflated.

    FWIW my 80+ year old late MIL used to take great pride in doing her regular car checks. She'd either ask me to check the tyres. or ask at the small local garage.
    • Susie Richards
    • By Susie Richards 5th Dec 17, 5:39 PM
    • 520 Posts
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    Susie Richards
    We just had maps and common sense when i learnt how to drive.
    Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, even if it is wrong.
    • joansgirl
    • By joansgirl 5th Dec 17, 7:43 PM
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    joansgirl
    All due respect, and not "having a go" but you should know how to do these things.
    It's all in the manual, and a tyre pressure gauge isn't expensive.
    Apart from the a fact that checking the oil and other fluid levels under the bonnet could save you a lot of money, tyres wear better when they are correctly inflated.
    They are also a lot safer. If you have a serious accident, and tyre pressures were checked then, you could be in trouble if they were underinflated.

    FWIW my 80+ year old late MIL used to take great pride in doing her regular car checks. She'd either ask me to check the tyres. or ask at the small local garage.
    Originally posted by Jackmydad
    I seem to let out more air than I put in
    Some people only exist as examples of what to avoid...
    .


    Finito
    • AubreyMac
    • By AubreyMac 5th Dec 17, 7:48 PM
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    AubreyMac
    No. I meant checking it with the air pressure thing at petrol stations, unless you have a unit at home, although I'm not sure how reliable those things are (the home ones, I mean).

    Yes, it is a pain, especially if you have a hurty knee!
    Originally posted by Pyxis
    Ah, then the device that I have in the boot does that.


    When I put it into my tyres it tells me the current psi then I have to set the device to the psi I want it to have then off it goes. It auto stops when it reaches the desired psi.
    • AubreyMac
    • By AubreyMac 5th Dec 17, 7:54 PM
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    • 2,814 Thanks
    AubreyMac
    All due respect, and not "having a go" but you should know how to do these things.
    It's all in the manual, and a tyre pressure gauge isn't expensive.
    Apart from the a fact that checking the oil and other fluid levels under the bonnet could save you a lot of money, tyres wear better when they are correctly inflated.
    They are also a lot safer. If you have a serious accident, and tyre pressures were checked then, you could be in trouble if they were underinflated.

    FWIW my 80+ year old late MIL used to take great pride in doing her regular car checks. She'd either ask me to check the tyres. or ask at the small local garage.
    Originally posted by Jackmydad
    I don't take your posts as 'having a go', you sound like my dad


    It is actually interesting and just demonstrates how much the younger generation relies on gadgets that just tells us things.


    My dad is old fashioned and in a way prefer old cars. He said when something went wrong you can open parts up and see what was wrong with it and fix it yourself. Now everything is operated electronically.
    • joansgirl
    • By joansgirl 5th Dec 17, 7:59 PM
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    joansgirl
    I don't take your posts as 'having a go', you sound like my dad


    It is actually interesting and just demonstrates how much the younger generation relies on gadgets that just tells us things.


    My dad is old fashioned and in a way prefer old cars. He said when something went wrong you can open parts up and see what was wrong with it and fix it yourself. Now everything is operated electronically.
    Originally posted by AubreyMac
    I used to love having a tinker under the bonnet of a weekend.
    Sadly not possible anymore
    Some people only exist as examples of what to avoid...
    .


    Finito
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