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    • Goath
    • By Goath 4th Dec 17, 12:29 PM
    • 13Posts
    • 2Thanks
    Goath
    Selling Acronyms
    • #1
    • 4th Dec 17, 12:29 PM
    Selling Acronyms 4th Dec 17 at 12:29 PM
    Selling Acronyms





    My Question is, what is best to have on a listing out of all them :-

    No Acronym

    (I don’t really want to have “in excess of” I don’t like the sound of it)

    Or

    Offers in the region of – I would like viewers to know that I am open to offers.

    Many Thanks
    Last edited by Goath; 04-12-2017 at 3:02 PM.
Page 1
    • Comms69
    • By Comms69 4th Dec 17, 12:31 PM
    • 1,315 Posts
    • 1,068 Thanks
    Comms69
    • #2
    • 4th Dec 17, 12:31 PM
    • #2
    • 4th Dec 17, 12:31 PM
    Honestly it actually makes no difference.


    Offers in excess off doesn't make a difference. I'd still look, and offer what I thought was reasonable. which could well be less.
    • glentoran99
    • By glentoran99 4th Dec 17, 12:32 PM
    • 4,939 Posts
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    glentoran99
    • #3
    • 4th Dec 17, 12:32 PM
    • #3
    • 4th Dec 17, 12:32 PM
    Offers around
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 4th Dec 17, 12:36 PM
    • 6,286 Posts
    • 6,066 Thanks
    davidmcn
    • #4
    • 4th Dec 17, 12:36 PM
    • #4
    • 4th Dec 17, 12:36 PM
    "Excess" does have negative connotations. In Scotland it's generally "offers over" which is a bit simpler - why use four words when you can use two? (and in practice sellers are often still open to offers below).
    • JoJo1978
    • By JoJo1978 4th Dec 17, 12:41 PM
    • 181 Posts
    • 178 Thanks
    JoJo1978
    • #5
    • 4th Dec 17, 12:41 PM
    • #5
    • 4th Dec 17, 12:41 PM
    My house had a guide price of x-x. We accepted an offer from someone who offered something below the bottom end. We did that to get into 2 purchase brackets on Rightmove.

    We purchased something that had a fixed price no abbreviations. Still offered below that price got accepted. We accepted that offer due to the circumstances of the vendor.

    Doesn’t really make a difference would be my opinion
    Hamster in the wheel (London) 1999-2017
    Mortgage free since 2015; Pension pot sorted 2017
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    • Aylesbury Duck
    • By Aylesbury Duck 4th Dec 17, 12:45 PM
    • 1,205 Posts
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    Aylesbury Duck
    • #6
    • 4th Dec 17, 12:45 PM
    • #6
    • 4th Dec 17, 12:45 PM
    Honestly it actually makes no difference.


    Offers in excess off doesn't make a difference. I'd still look, and offer what I thought was reasonable. which could well be less.
    Originally posted by Comms69
    Exactly this. Don't get hung up on marketing descriptors, they are utterly pointless.

    "Competitively priced" is a personal favourite, along with "Priced to sell". A complete waste of words on the page/screen.
    • Comms69
    • By Comms69 4th Dec 17, 12:50 PM
    • 1,315 Posts
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    Comms69
    • #7
    • 4th Dec 17, 12:50 PM
    • #7
    • 4th Dec 17, 12:50 PM
    Exactly this. Don't get hung up on marketing descriptors, they are utterly pointless.

    "Competitively priced" is a personal favourite, along with "Priced to sell". A complete waste of words on the page/screen.
    Originally posted by Aylesbury Duck


    Gotta get those buzzwords in!


    Spacious property, priced to sell, close proximity to transport links.


    = Normal property at this price, there's a bus stop with-in 300 metres....
    • ReadingTim
    • By ReadingTim 4th Dec 17, 1:19 PM
    • 2,227 Posts
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    ReadingTim
    • #8
    • 4th Dec 17, 1:19 PM
    • #8
    • 4th Dec 17, 1:19 PM
    To me, (in England) any acronym suggests a qualification to the price or offer process - a sort of "yes, but...." statement from the seller which I could do without. It may not mean it, but it certainly says it.

    I'd ditch it - if you're confused then your buyers will be too.
    • frugalmacdugal
    • By frugalmacdugal 4th Dec 17, 1:26 PM
    • 6,172 Posts
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    frugalmacdugal
    • #9
    • 4th Dec 17, 1:26 PM
    • #9
    • 4th Dec 17, 1:26 PM
    Hi,

    folks will pay what they think house is worth, and what they can afford.

    I like talking face to face with sellers/viewers, then you can negotiate, shake hands, and go see solicitor, get legalities sorted.
    Y'all take care now.
    • 00ec25
    • By 00ec25 4th Dec 17, 3:55 PM
    • 5,577 Posts
    • 4,979 Thanks
    00ec25
    OIRO is not an acronym, as you do not pronounce the letters as their own word. It is merely an abbreviation.

    "Offers in the region of" is simply full blown wording. It is meaningless, and has no place in selling property in the England and Wales property market (I know nothing about Scotland or N Ireland) as this is one of the few places where we still "haggle" and "expect" to buy for anything other than the stated price. Therefore, "offers in the region of" is implicit to the straightforward word "price".

    "offers in excess of" can be regarded as a turn off by many as it implies the vendor has a fixed price below which he will not go. A price the purchaser may well regard as too high to begin with so won't bother. In addition, there is no "pleasure"(?) to be obtained by the purchaser from the haggle, and thus the purchaser does not feel "content" that they secured THE Deal they wanted.

    priced to sell is also meaningless since it will sell for what it fetches. "Discounted by 20k to comparable properties sold prices within the last 2 months" would be more meaningful, but I somehow doubt you'd ever see that used
    • Surrey_EA
    • By Surrey_EA 4th Dec 17, 4:14 PM
    • 1,316 Posts
    • 1,590 Thanks
    Surrey_EA
    OIRO is not an acronym, as you do not pronounce the letters as their own word. It is merely an abbreviation.
    Originally posted by 00ec25
    Would it not be an initialism?
    • do163600
    • By do163600 4th Dec 17, 5:08 PM
    • 30 Posts
    • 30 Thanks
    do163600
    I find 'offers in excess of' very off-putting.
    • Aylesbury Duck
    • By Aylesbury Duck 4th Dec 17, 5:47 PM
    • 1,205 Posts
    • 1,505 Thanks
    Aylesbury Duck
    Would it not be an initialism?
    Originally posted by Surrey_EA
    Yes, an initialism but it is also an abbreviation.
    • daivid
    • By daivid 4th Dec 17, 7:29 PM
    • 155 Posts
    • 136 Thanks
    daivid
    I've only bought once, when I was looking I was also put off by offers in excess. If a house is new to the market I can understand the desire to chance ones arm as a seller. When looking at houses that had been on the market some time and where IMO clearly overpriced the tag put me off entering into any offers dialogue with a delusional seller.
    • bobobski
    • By bobobski 4th Dec 17, 10:33 PM
    • 677 Posts
    • 1,539 Thanks
    bobobski
    I've been on the hunt for a property for most of this year (long story) and I have literally ignored all descriptors ahead of the price. I wouldn't fret about it if I were you; if you're aiming to attract buyers, I'd just avoid anything that looks like game-playing.
    #18: Save 12k in 2017: £11,385.86 / £12,000 (94.8%) | #86: Save £12k in 2016: £8,476.09 / £10,000 (84.76%)
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    • Goath
    • By Goath 5th Dec 17, 10:58 AM
    • 13 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    Goath
    Thank you all


    Sorry I meant abbreviation - not Acronym


    So the general consensus is not to worry about it.
    • Mutton Geoff
    • By Mutton Geoff 5th Dec 17, 12:40 PM
    • 999 Posts
    • 1,042 Thanks
    Mutton Geoff
    "First to see will buy". Saw that in a house ad once when I thought that phrase was confined to the Arthur Daleys of this world!
    Compensations/Refunds from Banks & Institutions - £4,165 | Stooz Profits - £7,636 | Quidco - £4,014

    All with a big thank you to Martin and MSE.com from Mutton Geoff!
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 5th Dec 17, 1:32 PM
    • 6,286 Posts
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    davidmcn
    "First to see will buy". Saw that in a house ad once when I thought that phrase was confined to the Arthur Daleys of this world!
    Originally posted by Mutton Geoff
    Sounds rather sinister. Do they lock you in until you sign the contract?
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