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    • John Chip
    • By John Chip 3rd Dec 17, 4:50 PM
    • 26Posts
    • 1Thanks
    John Chip
    Can I ask for redundancy if workload has decreased?
    • #1
    • 3rd Dec 17, 4:50 PM
    Can I ask for redundancy if workload has decreased? 3rd Dec 17 at 4:50 PM
    I work for a small company and my workload has greatly decreased in the last 2 years.

    Iím literally doing next to nothing some days - which is not healthy or good.

    Having been there for 10 years and prospects not looking great I would like to move on.

    However My boss seems to have his head in the sand and seems content to pay me to do very little. Chances are I reckon the place will go under in a few years - I would rather get out now.

    If my role has dwindled so much can I suggest / force my redundancy?

    I would like to get something for my 10 years rather than just leave.
Page 2
    • steampowered
    • By steampowered 4th Dec 17, 11:25 AM
    • 1,958 Posts
    • 1,829 Thanks
    steampowered
    Just because you've been there 10 years doesn't mean you can't find a new job.

    Redundancy is there to compensate people for the time they will be out of work.

    If circumstances have changed and you are unhappy, it might be time to try and find a new employer. But you don't get paid extra for that.
    • Ozzuk
    • By Ozzuk 4th Dec 17, 11:26 AM
    • 1,179 Posts
    • 1,727 Thanks
    Ozzuk
    Another way to look at it, how confident are you that you'll find another job? If you aren't that confident then weigh up the 10k versus how long it could take to find something - 6 months? A year? Suddenly the '10k' doesn't look as good as having a new job, potentially better pay, better conditions etc. I'd jump ship in your position, using the current free time to upskill.
    • jamesmorgan
    • By jamesmorgan 4th Dec 17, 11:39 AM
    • 348 Posts
    • 332 Thanks
    jamesmorgan
    Statutory redundancy pay is capped at £489/week so if you are under 41 the maximum you can get for 10 years service is £4890.

    https://www.gov.uk/redundant-your-rights/redundancy-pay
    • Gavin83
    • By Gavin83 4th Dec 17, 11:42 AM
    • 4,731 Posts
    • 7,516 Thanks
    Gavin83
    It is a small company - I carved out my niche over ten years with a lot of effort.

    I would like to move on - a lot easier with a 10k cushion.

    Bottom line - my company cannot afford to make me redundant and Iím not walking away with nothing after 10 years of work.

    Front line austerity UK.
    Originally posted by John Chip
    I don't know where you've got the £10k figure from. What no one here has stated is that redundancy payments are capped at £489 for every year you work, so £4890 and this is of course assuming you earn more than £489 a week. You get a week and a half for every year you were over 41. Companies are free to pay you more than this if they wish but given they don't seem keen to make you redundant and you say they've got no money I see this as unlikely.

    If you are that concerned about your position find another job and resign. You aren't entitled to anything just because you've been there 10 years.
    • nicechap
    • By nicechap 4th Dec 17, 12:06 PM
    • 841 Posts
    • 1,909 Thanks
    nicechap
    If the company goes belly up, there be quite a delay before getting anything out of the government scheme.

    Whilst on JLA/ universal credit waiting for it, think how much better life would have been in another job taking on new challenges, earning a wage & saving for a pension.
    Quote was right and saw into the future.
    • Pricivius
    • By Pricivius 4th Dec 17, 1:33 PM
    • 589 Posts
    • 980 Thanks
    Pricivius
    Whilst it is the case that there is a cap on statutory redundancy payments, these are the minimum required by law. A company can pay as much as it wants to and some companies have very generous redundancy policies. It may be the case that OP's company is one of the generous ones that possibly doesn't cap the weekly pay, or gives more than 1 week per year of employment.
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 4th Dec 17, 2:39 PM
    • 10,052 Posts
    • 8,122 Thanks
    lincroft1710
    Whilst it is the case that there is a cap on statutory redundancy payments, these are the minimum required by law. A company can pay as much as it wants to and some companies have very generous redundancy policies. It may be the case that OP's company is one of the generous ones that possibly doesn't cap the weekly pay, or gives more than 1 week per year of employment.
    Originally posted by Pricivius
    But if the company goes under as OP keeps suggesting, he'll only get statutory redundancy.
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