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  • FIRST POST
    • John Chip
    • By John Chip 3rd Dec 17, 4:50 PM
    • 26Posts
    • 1Thanks
    John Chip
    Can I ask for redundancy if workload has decreased?
    • #1
    • 3rd Dec 17, 4:50 PM
    Can I ask for redundancy if workload has decreased? 3rd Dec 17 at 4:50 PM
    I work for a small company and my workload has greatly decreased in the last 2 years.

    Iím literally doing next to nothing some days - which is not healthy or good.

    Having been there for 10 years and prospects not looking great I would like to move on.

    However My boss seems to have his head in the sand and seems content to pay me to do very little. Chances are I reckon the place will go under in a few years - I would rather get out now.

    If my role has dwindled so much can I suggest / force my redundancy?

    I would like to get something for my 10 years rather than just leave.
Page 1
    • Robin9
    • By Robin9 3rd Dec 17, 4:52 PM
    • 1,947 Posts
    • 1,260 Thanks
    Robin9
    • #2
    • 3rd Dec 17, 4:52 PM
    • #2
    • 3rd Dec 17, 4:52 PM
    You can ask - they can say no
    Never pay on an estimated bill
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 3rd Dec 17, 5:07 PM
    • 10,032 Posts
    • 8,092 Thanks
    lincroft1710
    • #3
    • 3rd Dec 17, 5:07 PM
    • #3
    • 3rd Dec 17, 5:07 PM
    You can't expect to get a gratuity in the form of redundancy pay just because you have been there 10 years.

    If there is still a job for you then you can't be made redundant. If you want to leave then look for another job and resign when you have another job to go to.
    • John Chip
    • By John Chip 3rd Dec 17, 5:14 PM
    • 26 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    John Chip
    • #4
    • 3rd Dec 17, 5:14 PM
    • #4
    • 3rd Dec 17, 5:14 PM
    Well if my job role and workload has vanished - then I don’t have the job I have been doing for 10 years. My boss is content to pay me to do nothing however - ‘until things pick up’ - maybe never.
    • sangie595
    • By sangie595 3rd Dec 17, 5:19 PM
    • 4,171 Posts
    • 6,863 Thanks
    sangie595
    • #5
    • 3rd Dec 17, 5:19 PM
    • #5
    • 3rd Dec 17, 5:19 PM
    Well if my job role and workload has vanished - then I donít have the job I have been doing for 10 years. My boss is content to pay me to do nothing however - Ďuntil things pick upí - maybe never.
    Originally posted by John Chip
    That's his choice, not yours. You want to leave, then do. You don't get redundancy for wanting to leave. You can suggest it, but he's entitled to say no.
    • Robin9
    • By Robin9 3rd Dec 17, 5:20 PM
    • 1,947 Posts
    • 1,260 Thanks
    Robin9
    • #6
    • 3rd Dec 17, 5:20 PM
    • #6
    • 3rd Dec 17, 5:20 PM
    Seek out a new job while you are in control - rather than having to find one at short notice when the company folds.
    Never pay on an estimated bill
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 3rd Dec 17, 5:25 PM
    • 10,032 Posts
    • 8,092 Thanks
    lincroft1710
    • #7
    • 3rd Dec 17, 5:25 PM
    • #7
    • 3rd Dec 17, 5:25 PM
    Well if my job role and workload has vanished - then I donít have the job I have been doing for 10 years. My boss is content to pay me to do nothing however - Ďuntil things pick upí - maybe never.
    Originally posted by John Chip
    If your job has "vanished" it is up to your employer whether or not your job is redundant and if he can find a suitable alternative, or is content to keep on paying you, you will not be made redundant. He may not want to lose you.
    • TELLIT01
    • By TELLIT01 3rd Dec 17, 6:36 PM
    • 4,245 Posts
    • 4,422 Thanks
    TELLIT01
    • #8
    • 3rd Dec 17, 6:36 PM
    • #8
    • 3rd Dec 17, 6:36 PM
    You certainly cannot force your employer to make you redundant simply because you don't think you have enough work to do. If the owner is happy to continue to pay you, the only way out is to resign.
    • John Chip
    • By John Chip 3rd Dec 17, 6:38 PM
    • 26 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    John Chip
    • #9
    • 3rd Dec 17, 6:38 PM
    • #9
    • 3rd Dec 17, 6:38 PM
    I am employed to do a job - the role has basically vanished. A worker is made redundant when his or her role no longer exists. I would stay if I still had the work I am employed to do was still there. By not addressing this fact my boss is basically Ďmoth balling meí or - hoping I will leave (out of sheer boredom) instead of having to pay the redundancy pay that 10+ years of employment would necessitate.
    • nicechap
    • By nicechap 3rd Dec 17, 7:05 PM
    • 841 Posts
    • 1,909 Thanks
    nicechap
    I am employed to do a job - the role has basically vanished. A worker is made redundant when his or her role no longer exists. I would stay if I still had the work I am employed to do was still there. By not addressing this fact my boss is basically Ďmoth balling meí or - hoping I will leave (out of sheer boredom) instead of having to pay the redundancy pay that 10+ years of employment would necessitate.
    Originally posted by John Chip

    It doesn't make economic sense to keep someone on if there is no work. Have you made a business case to your boss that it'd be cheaper to pay you redundancy (statutory between 10 and 15 weeks pay on your info - or voluntary, whatever your company is willing to pay, not necessarily what they've paid to others in the past).

    Whilst 15 weeks pay is not to be sniffed at, weigh that against the certainty of a new job, challenges, pay & pension.
    Quote was right and saw into the future.
    • sangie595
    • By sangie595 3rd Dec 17, 8:42 PM
    • 4,171 Posts
    • 6,863 Thanks
    sangie595
    I am employed to do a job - the role has basically vanished. A worker is made redundant when his or her role no longer exists. I would stay if I still had the work I am employed to do was still there. By not addressing this fact my boss is basically Ďmoth balling meí or - hoping I will leave (out of sheer boredom) instead of having to pay the redundancy pay that 10+ years of employment would necessitate.
    Originally posted by John Chip
    No. A worker is redundant when their employer says that they don't need the role any longer. Not when you decide they don't.
    • John Chip
    • By John Chip 3rd Dec 17, 9:32 PM
    • 26 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    John Chip
    I think the true situation is that the company is near to broke and it cannot afford to make me or anyone else redundant - so it will eventually go bust and the government will pick up the tab and pay the redundancy bill. Meanwhile I will wait for that to happen as if I resigned now I would be gutted if my colleagues of equal service all picked up redundancy payments.
    • Tabbytabitha
    • By Tabbytabitha 3rd Dec 17, 9:36 PM
    • 449 Posts
    • 888 Thanks
    Tabbytabitha
    If you've been there for 10 years you must know the company well - can't you look round and carve out a niche for yourself elsewhere in the firm?

    Alternatively, rather than doing nothing, why not use your downtime to study independently and improve your qualifications?
    • John Chip
    • By John Chip 3rd Dec 17, 10:01 PM
    • 26 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    John Chip
    It is a small company - I carved out my niche over ten years with a lot of effort.

    I would like to move on - a lot easier with a 10k cushion.

    Bottom line - my company cannot afford to make me redundant and Iím not walking away with nothing after 10 years of work.

    Front line austerity UK.
    • gettingtheresometime
    • By gettingtheresometime 3rd Dec 17, 11:24 PM
    • 3,128 Posts
    • 7,305 Thanks
    gettingtheresometime
    What a b****y stupid attitude to take.

    So you feel that because you’ve been there 10 years you deserve something in redundancy payments.

    I don’t know how old you are but you do realise you won’t get what the company should have paid you don’t you?

    Personally if the company is so close to going under I’d be looking at the job ads very carefully - but there again I’ve always believed it’s better to know where I’m jumping to rather than be pushed & hope I land safely
    Lloyds OD / Natwest OD / PO CC / Wescott / Argos Card cleared thanks to the 1 debt v 100 day challenge


    Next on the list - JD Williams
    • paddedjohn
    • By paddedjohn 3rd Dec 17, 11:52 PM
    • 7,074 Posts
    • 7,724 Thanks
    paddedjohn
    It is a small company - I carved out my niche over ten years with a lot of effort.

    I would like to move on - a lot easier with a 10k cushion.

    Bottom line - my company cannot afford to make me redundant and Iím not walking away with nothing after 10 years of work.

    Front line austerity UK.
    Originally posted by John Chip
    Unless you are paid £1000 a week before stoppages you won't be getting £10k even if you were to receive redundancy pay.
    You would be entitled to 1 weeks pay for every full year between the ages of 22-41 and 1.5 weeks pay thereafter upto a certain max
    Be Alert..........Britain needs lerts.
    • bugslet
    • By bugslet 4th Dec 17, 7:35 AM
    • 5,753 Posts
    • 28,196 Thanks
    bugslet
    I remember two very disgruntled drivers at my firm, moaning that work was quiet. I had a meeting with them, told them it was quiet, it would change, I couldn't say when.

    One chose to leave, one chose to stay. The one that left is one of these 'self-employed truck drivers with no truck of their own' and the other is still with me 6-7 ish years laters.

    I had the attitude that I had a commitment to both my drivers to cover their pay even though the firm wasn't earning that much. Maybe your boss feels the same.
    Last edited by bugslet; 04-12-2017 at 8:51 AM. Reason: spelling
    • TELLIT01
    • By TELLIT01 4th Dec 17, 8:20 AM
    • 4,245 Posts
    • 4,422 Thanks
    TELLIT01
    Unless you are paid £1000 a week before stoppages you won't be getting £10k even if you were to receive redundancy pay.
    You would be entitled to 1 weeks pay for every full year between the ages of 22-41 and 1.5 weeks pay thereafter upto a certain max
    Originally posted by paddedjohn
    On the supposed national average wage of £28k, somebody entitled to 1.5 weeks per year of service would get about £8.5k, so not too far off with the £10k figure.

    I can understand the OP's feeling about walking away with nothing, but redundancy money won't last long if a new job isn't found quickly.
    • Takeaway_Addict
    • By Takeaway_Addict 4th Dec 17, 9:08 AM
    • 5,666 Posts
    • 6,466 Thanks
    Takeaway_Addict
    I work for a small company and my workload has greatly decreased in the last 2 years.

    Iím literally doing next to nothing some days - which is not healthy or good.

    Having been there for 10 years and prospects not looking great I would like to move on.

    However My boss seems to have his head in the sand and seems content to pay me to do very little. Chances are I reckon the place will go under in a few years - I would rather get out now.

    If my role has dwindled so much can I suggest / force my redundancy?

    I would like to get something for my 10 years rather than just leave.
    Originally posted by John Chip
    Clearly your health isn't that important to you if you're only not leaving due to the hope of a payout...
    Don't trust a forum for advice. Get proper paid advice. Any advice given should always be checked
    • stator
    • By stator 4th Dec 17, 9:32 AM
    • 5,906 Posts
    • 3,889 Thanks
    stator
    Sorry but you're not going to get what you want.
    Either stay and wait for a redundancy that might never happen or find a better job elsewhere whilst you have the luxury of finding something that you like
    Changing the world, one sarcastic comment at a time.
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