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  • FIRST POST
    • wiggywoo9
    • By wiggywoo9 2nd Dec 17, 8:24 PM
    • 425Posts
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    wiggywoo9
    Landlord wants tenant to fit a kitchen?
    • #1
    • 2nd Dec 17, 8:24 PM
    Landlord wants tenant to fit a kitchen? 2nd Dec 17 at 8:24 PM
    Hi all,

    So I'm currently looking to rent a house. I currently live in a HA flat and want something better for my son. I've found this house in a very nice area, very good schools, lovely garden, accepts pets and children. Bit more expensive than I was hoping to pay but not at the top end yet. And a big plus is long-term let so not upheaval. However! Called the estate agent and she says it's been on the market a while, last tenant was an elderly lady who sadly died. She said the kitchen has no cupboards and pretty bare. The landlord is hoping the new tenant will make it a long-term home but expects them to fit the kitchen in, offering 1 month free rent is they do so. Apparently tenants used to do this in the past.

    OK! So that's a pretty tall order- don't want to lose a good place that otherwise ticks all the boxes- what would you do??
    Up and onwards to the future!

Page 2
    • FBaby
    • By FBaby 3rd Dec 17, 7:42 AM
    • 16,129 Posts
    • 40,035 Thanks
    FBaby
    Tenancy where the tenants take on some maintenance can work in some occasions. It doesn't in most. I agree that it sounds like the issue is not so much that they can't afford it (if they can lose one month's rent) but that they don't have the time/energy/bother to deal with it. This is likely to mean that the same would apply to everything else. Do you want to take on a property where every time something goes wrong, you'll be ask to sort out yourself, even if they agree to a reduce rental payment?

    Also, what happens if you get someone to fit it and something goes wrong?
    • Chrysalis
    • By Chrysalis 3rd Dec 17, 7:58 AM
    • 2,083 Posts
    • 955 Thanks
    Chrysalis
    I agree with the first reply.

    nicer area etc, may seem great, but the two most important things with a home is security and stability, and affordability shouldnt be sniffed at either.

    I expect a HA property wins all three of those, especially the first two.

    If you change your mind you may be surprised how hard it is to get back into a HA property once you privately renting.
    • Murphybear
    • By Murphybear 3rd Dec 17, 8:12 AM
    • 3,302 Posts
    • 6,799 Thanks
    Murphybear
    It’s the landlords job to put in a new kitchen, not the tenants. He’s going to find it hard to get a decent tenant without a proper kitchen.

    A landlord can promise the earth then suddenly, without needing a reason, give notice.
    • csgohan4
    • By csgohan4 3rd Dec 17, 8:31 AM
    • 4,019 Posts
    • 2,499 Thanks
    csgohan4
    nothing stopping the LL chucking you out after the kitchen is done, no security actually.
    "It is prudent when shopping for something important, not to limit yourself to Pound land"
    • t0rt0ise
    • By t0rt0ise 3rd Dec 17, 9:04 AM
    • 2,934 Posts
    • 1,800 Thanks
    t0rt0ise
    Look at https://www.homeswapper.co.uk first. I got an HA swap through them. It’s the best thing I ever did.
    • KxMx
    • By KxMx 3rd Dec 17, 9:47 AM
    • 7,220 Posts
    • 10,142 Thanks
    KxMx
    I honestly think it doesn't get better for your son than security of tenancy, which you have now and will not get in the private sector.
    • WibblyGirly
    • By WibblyGirly 3rd Dec 17, 10:33 AM
    • 234 Posts
    • 461 Thanks
    WibblyGirly
    Just to add, when letting agents/landlords say its long term, don't bother believing it. I've been told that numerous times and one gave me notice after 4 months as they needed their house back!
    I'd stay in the HA flat and try get a house swap.
    Also I'd never fit a kitchen or anything like that in a landlords house. Part of the higher costs with renting is that that sort of stuff is not the tenants responsibility.
    • G_M
    • By G_M 3rd Dec 17, 11:45 AM
    • 42,308 Posts
    • 49,155 Thanks
    G_M

    A landlord can promise the earth then suddenly, without needing a reason, give notice.
    Originally posted by Murphybear
    nothing stopping the LL chucking you out after the kitchen is done, no security actually.
    Rubbish.

    See point 3 in post 18.
    • poppasmurf_bewdley
    • By poppasmurf_bewdley 3rd Dec 17, 12:11 PM
    • 5,059 Posts
    • 5,201 Thanks
    poppasmurf_bewdley
    You would be stupid to give away the tenancy of a Housing Association for the vagaries of the private housing sector.
    "Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen pounds nineteen and six, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds nought and six, result misery." Mr Wilkins Micawber in David Copperfield by Charles Dickens.
    • deannatrois
    • By deannatrois 3rd Dec 17, 12:31 PM
    • 4,915 Posts
    • 6,882 Thanks
    deannatrois
    I understand from other threads that you want to 'better yourself' and you are doing so so well given what you have experienced. But don't try this at the cost of a stable home.

    You could always stay in the HA flat and save hard so you could buy a home (put aside the extra money you would pay for a private rental, in my area private rentals are more than twice what social housing costs). It will take longer, but not forever. If you can afford a private rental, you should be able to save for a deposit to buy a home, hopefully.
    • Murphybear
    • By Murphybear 3rd Dec 17, 1:33 PM
    • 3,302 Posts
    • 6,799 Thanks
    Murphybear
    Rubbish.

    See point 3 in post 18.
    Originally posted by G_M
    Not rubbish at all. After looking for a rental that suited us for 6 months we found what seemed to be the ideal property. We signed a 6 month AST in August and thought we’d be there for years. We were good tenants, we were in the last property for 9 years.

    We got a S 21 yesterday, after less than 4 months. We are good tenants, we pay the rent and bills on time, don’t play loud music, dont have noisy visitors and keep the house immaculate. The landlord doesn’t want the house back to move in or for his relatives, it will be relet through the same agents.

    So don’t tell me rubbish
    • G_M
    • By G_M 3rd Dec 17, 2:59 PM
    • 42,308 Posts
    • 49,155 Thanks
    G_M
    Not rubbish at all. After looking for a rental that suited us for 6 months we found what seemed to be the ideal property. We signed a 6 month AST in August and thought we’d be there for years. We were good tenants, we were in the last property for 9 years.

    We got a S 21 yesterday, after less than 4 months.
    Originally posted by Murphybear
    You clearly did not read point 3 in post 18!

    If you signed a 6 month AST, then naturally you were only secure for 6 months.

    Had you signed a 3 year contract (as per point 3/post 18), you could not have been served a valid S21 after 6 months. That is exactly why I made the pont I did.
    • Tygermoth
    • By Tygermoth 3rd Dec 17, 3:12 PM
    • 1,295 Posts
    • 2,617 Thanks
    Tygermoth
    Many years ago we had a landlord who came to a similar agreement with us when we moved in. We fitted the new kitchen and he was so pleased. (we had lived in a previous house of his for house three years at this point - good tenants no arrears)

    He then evicted us and sold the house making a profit as we had painted through out and had the carpets replaced when our freezer leaked.

    The mainly cosmetic changes we had made gave the house a fresh look and the new modern kitchen gained him 15K over houses in the same street he was smug enough to tell us.
    Last edited by Tygermoth; 03-12-2017 at 3:16 PM.
    Please note I have a cognitive disability - as such my wording can be a bit off, muddled, misspelt or in some cases i can miss out some words totally...
    • wiggywoo9
    • By wiggywoo9 3rd Dec 17, 3:56 PM
    • 425 Posts
    • 1,632 Thanks
    wiggywoo9
    Thanks for your responses. Much appreciated.

    I want to move for several reasons-

    1) The area is very run-down and poor. Poor quality of life, kids just end up as thugs, etc. No community, no friends nearby. Very isolated on outskirts of city.
    2) Flat itself although I've done my damndest to get it looking OK is small, outdated and has a nasty roof-top balcony over the top of the stairway which is similar to a pig-sty.
    3) No garden, no memories for my son of playing outside, inviting friends over, letting dog out etc. I feel my son is suffering in this way. He would do better with a sense of community and friends around him.

    Private renting seems to be the only way. Swaps are not possible- no-one is ever going to want this place in place of an actual house. I've tried. HA won't help no matter how I plead.

    I have been saving to buy- which I was going to use a chunk of for renting. I want to move sooner rather than later though as I feel my son's childhood is slowly going.

    Regarding this house and the kitchen- the rent is £575PM. I will go and see it this week and see what they say. I was thinking I could just put in some cupboards from IKEA. I have white goods already. I'm moving with my partner so we will both chip in.
    Up and onwards to the future!

    • Mela322
    • By Mela322 3rd Dec 17, 4:49 PM
    • 73 Posts
    • 51 Thanks
    Mela322
    Not rubbish at all. After looking for a rental that suited us for 6 months we found what seemed to be the ideal property. We signed a 6 month AST in August and thought we’d be there for years. We were good tenants, we were in the last property for 9 years.

    We got a S 21 yesterday, after less than 4 months. We are good tenants, we pay the rent and bills on time, don’t play loud music, dont have noisy visitors and keep the house immaculate. The landlord doesn’t want the house back to move in or for his relatives, it will be relet through the same agents.

    So don’t tell me rubbish
    Originally posted by Murphybear
    Seems odd for a landlord to want to get rid of a good tenant after just 4 months.
    • franklee
    • By franklee 3rd Dec 17, 5:31 PM
    • 3,554 Posts
    • 3,764 Thanks
    franklee
    If you signed a 6 month AST, then naturally you were only secure for 6 months.

    Had you signed a 3 year contract (as per point 3/post 18), you could not have been served a valid S21 after 6 months. That is exactly why I made the pont I did.
    Originally posted by G_M
    True however in my experience landlords don't wish to offer more than 6 or possibly 12 months fixed terms to a new and untested tenants. That leaves a prospective tenant with difficulty distinguishing between the genuine long term landlord and the stop gap landlord when viewing properties. This is especially true when via agents who are pretty free with saying it's a long term let regardless.
    • franklee
    • By franklee 3rd Dec 17, 5:36 PM
    • 3,554 Posts
    • 3,764 Thanks
    franklee
    Not rubbish at all. After looking for a rental that suited us for 6 months we found what seemed to be the ideal property. We signed a 6 month AST in August and thought we’d be there for years. We were good tenants, we were in the last property for 9 years.

    We got a S 21 yesterday, after less than 4 months. We are good tenants, we pay the rent and bills on time, don’t play loud music, dont have noisy visitors and keep the house immaculate. The landlord doesn’t want the house back to move in or for his relatives, it will be relet through the same agents.
    Originally posted by Murphybear
    I sympathise, it's tough when a S21 appears out of the blue like that.

    Have you talked to the landlord about it directly to check it isn't the letting agent playing games for more fees? Once the landlord has paid for any void time and the agent's fees he will be worse off than keeping you there even if he gets a small rent increase from the new tenant.

    If OTOH your rent is well below other comparable properties that may explain it?

    Can you see if it's been for sale, e.g. via zoopla's history, maybe the landlord does want to sell?
    • Silvertabby
    • By Silvertabby 3rd Dec 17, 5:37 PM
    • 1,936 Posts
    • 2,443 Thanks
    Silvertabby
    If you really want this house, then buy unfitted kitchen furniture that you can take with you if/when you move.

    If you can't afford new, furniture auction houses usually have welsh dressers, larder type cupboards, etc.
    • Chrysalis
    • By Chrysalis 3rd Dec 17, 6:31 PM
    • 2,083 Posts
    • 955 Thanks
    Chrysalis
    You clearly did not read point 3 in post 18!

    If you signed a 6 month AST, then naturally you were only secure for 6 months.

    Had you signed a 3 year contract (as per point 3/post 18), you could not have been served a valid S21 after 6 months. That is exactly why I made the pont I did.
    Originally posted by G_M
    True but have you ever heard of a modern landlord giving out a 3 year tenancy?

    They probably still happen but I expect are very rare.

    I have been with my landlord for over 10 years, and he even started reducing my tenancy agreements from 12 to 10 months.

    My landlord is unusual tho, he is in the business as a proper business (biggest landlord in my city) and actually runs his own agency, so doesnt source to a third party LA as well. I feel I could be here for life as long as I keep up rent payments which for the private sector is very unusual, but of course I am always vulnerable to my landlord deciding to sell up or something else to evict me.
    • G_M
    • By G_M 3rd Dec 17, 7:52 PM
    • 42,308 Posts
    • 49,155 Thanks
    G_M
    True however in my experience landlords don't wish to offer more than 6 or possibly 12 months fixed terms to a new and untested tenants. .
    Originally posted by franklee
    I agree.

    But equally, how many landords ask their tenants to spend money and time installing a kitchen?

    This is an unusual situation that clearly requires negotiation. So if the prospective tenant is happy with the property (other than the kitchen) the obvious thing to say is: "I'd be happy to take the property as it is, and install a kitchen, but only if I'm guaranteed a long-term tenancy. Will you grant me a 3 year contract?"

    If the landlord refuses and offers the standard 6 months, the tenant would then be mad to install the kitchen, for all the reasons given above.
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