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  • FIRST POST
    • isplumm
    • By isplumm 2nd Dec 17, 7:25 PM
    • 1,814Posts
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    isplumm
    New kitchen or not? Advise needed
    • #1
    • 2nd Dec 17, 7:25 PM
    New kitchen or not? Advise needed 2nd Dec 17 at 7:25 PM
    Hi,

    We are looking to put our semi detached house on the market.

    My wife & I are having a disagreement as to whether we should update the kitchen or not.

    It is about 18ft by 10ft and was updated back in 2003, so is now 14 years old & starting to show its age. The style is old farmhouse - but we live in a modern house, so it really needs updating. There is also a crack in the wooden floor tiles.

    My view is that with the modern age, we need to update the kitchen, as people will look online, just see a tired kitchen and move on. My wife thinks that people will still visit & try & knock us down in price.

    Thoughts?

    Thanks Mark
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Page 1
    • jennifernil
    • By jennifernil 2nd Dec 17, 7:47 PM
    • 5,005 Posts
    • 2,083 Thanks
    jennifernil
    • #2
    • 2nd Dec 17, 7:47 PM
    • #2
    • 2nd Dec 17, 7:47 PM
    My view is that tastes in kitchens are very variable, not everyone may like what you fit, either in layout or style, and that you are unlikely to get as much more for the house as you spend.

    Most people would probably prefer an older kitchen that is OK to use for a bit while they decide what they would like to do with it.
    • JoJo1978
    • By JoJo1978 2nd Dec 17, 7:53 PM
    • 181 Posts
    • 178 Thanks
    JoJo1978
    • #3
    • 2nd Dec 17, 7:53 PM
    • #3
    • 2nd Dec 17, 7:53 PM
    I'd be tempted to put it on the market as is and only consider updating if a) was on months with no offers and b) the kitchen was specifically mentioned in feedback
    Hamster in the wheel (London) 1999-2017
    Mortgage free since 2015; Pension pot sorted 2017
    Second career (what TBD!) 2018
    • Slithery
    • By Slithery 2nd Dec 17, 7:53 PM
    • 365 Posts
    • 530 Thanks
    Slithery
    • #4
    • 2nd Dec 17, 7:53 PM
    • #4
    • 2nd Dec 17, 7:53 PM
    You won't recover the money you spend on a new kitchen. It should, however, make the property easier to sell.
    • Sarastro
    • By Sarastro 2nd Dec 17, 8:12 PM
    • 367 Posts
    • 283 Thanks
    Sarastro
    • #5
    • 2nd Dec 17, 8:12 PM
    • #5
    • 2nd Dec 17, 8:12 PM
    It all depends on how much you spend on updating the kitchen. You could completely change it just by changing the cupboard door units and repainting which might not be terribly expensive. Why don't you just put it on the market as it is and see if you wife is right?
    • FTBuyerGlasgow
    • By FTBuyerGlasgow 2nd Dec 17, 9:14 PM
    • 17 Posts
    • 13 Thanks
    FTBuyerGlasgow
    • #6
    • 2nd Dec 17, 9:14 PM
    • #6
    • 2nd Dec 17, 9:14 PM
    As a first time buyer we were delighted to get a kitchen in a "move-in" condition, it was brand new and we didn't need to spend any money on it.

    For other buyers though, I'd be tempted to leave as is.

    In short, if your property is at the lower end of the market then get a new kitchen because the people looking to buy it won't want the expense of a new kitchen.

    If it's at say £200k plus then don't bother with a new kitchen as the buyer will want to put their own in.

    Hope this helps.
    Started out with nothing, still got most of it left.
    • LandyAndy
    • By LandyAndy 2nd Dec 17, 9:24 PM
    • 24,003 Posts
    • 50,778 Thanks
    LandyAndy
    • #7
    • 2nd Dec 17, 9:24 PM
    • #7
    • 2nd Dec 17, 9:24 PM
    I wouldn't pay a penny extra for a new kitchen I didn't like than I would for an old one I didn't like. If all the appliances work and it is clean that is enough.
    • Fosterdog
    • By Fosterdog 2nd Dec 17, 9:27 PM
    • 3,452 Posts
    • 5,897 Thanks
    Fosterdog
    • #8
    • 2nd Dec 17, 9:27 PM
    • #8
    • 2nd Dec 17, 9:27 PM
    I was a first time buyer last year and the kitchen was 14 years old, now 15 and not to our tastes at all but we bought it anyway and will just live with it for a few years until we can afford to ge5 it done to our tastes. There’s nothing actually wrongs with it, it’s just purely cosmetic reasons.

    We found the right sized house, in the right location, and at the right price, it is structurally sound, has a lot more positives than negatives for us so we happily bought even though we don’t like the kitchen or the bathroom. They are both perfectly liveable until we get around to doing the work and in a much better condition than I’ve ever had in rental houses.

    In your position I’d do nothing and see how the viewings go.
    • goodwithsaving
    • By goodwithsaving 2nd Dec 17, 9:45 PM
    • 713 Posts
    • 1,057 Thanks
    goodwithsaving
    • #9
    • 2nd Dec 17, 9:45 PM
    • #9
    • 2nd Dec 17, 9:45 PM
    I look for an older kitchen, it's something I prefer done to my taste.
    I'd leave it. If it causes problems, then gauge it, change it and relist. If it doesn't, you'll have saved yourself a good few thou!
    Every time you borrow money, you’re robbing your future self. –Nathan W. Morris
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 2nd Dec 17, 9:50 PM
    • 28,657 Posts
    • 72,990 Thanks
    Mojisola
    I wouldn't pay a penny extra for a new kitchen I didn't like than I would for an old one I didn't like. If all the appliances work and it is clean that is enough.
    Originally posted by LandyAndy
    This ^

    I wouldn't buy a house with a brand-new kitchen if it wasn't to my taste because I'd feel awful about stripping out new cupboards and appliances while I wouldn't mind doing this for an old, tired kitchen.

    Is your buyer going to want a gas or electric hob? A single or double oven? Traditional cupboards or all deep drawers? Tiles or glass splash backs? Etc, etc.....
    • tealady
    • By tealady 2nd Dec 17, 10:51 PM
    • 2,742 Posts
    • 3,248 Thanks
    tealady
    Hi
    Another vote for leaving the kitchen as it is.
    There is a house near to me described to me as "ready to move in to" from my point of view I LOATHE the kitchen and would want to rip it out and start again.
    I would rather buy a house a bit cheaper and live with an old kitchen than have to rip out band new stuff such as "brick "tiles and black surfaces (both of which I loathe).
    And don't get me started on roll top baths!
    Proud to be an MSE nerd
    Judge people by their achievements, not by their mistakes
    • FBaby
    • By FBaby 3rd Dec 17, 7:46 AM
    • 16,149 Posts
    • 40,070 Thanks
    FBaby
    no right or wrong. If you put a new one in, you are taking the risk of having a potential buyer who is put off the house because they don't like it, but will feel that they can't replace it as it's new.

    If you leave it as is and reduce the price accordingly, you might very much find that potential buyers don't see it that way and might still expect a further reduction.

    Could you leave it as it is and see how it goes and if you are not selling at the price you want and feedback is the kitchen, then doing it then?
    • kittie
    • By kittie 3rd Dec 17, 7:56 AM
    • 11,393 Posts
    • 65,046 Thanks
    kittie
    no, definitely not, don`t do it. I am a cash buyer and have been completely put off even looking at some houses that have had completely unsuitable kitchens put in, obviously to sell the house. They have completely the opposite effect on me, I want my own kitchen and will design my own
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 3rd Dec 17, 7:58 AM
    • 23,717 Posts
    • 89,708 Thanks
    Davesnave
    Does the house offer so few advantages that the kitchen's a deal breaker?

    Houses sell on location, aspect, plot size, number of bedrooms, space and a few other things that are hard to change + their price.

    Anyone can change a kitchen and no one will want to pay extra for someone else's choice.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • Murphybear
    • By Murphybear 3rd Dec 17, 8:16 AM
    • 3,308 Posts
    • 6,811 Thanks
    Murphybear
    The kitchen is a really good size and that should attract buyers. It doesn't matter what sort of kitchen you put in, it will be your taste, not necessarily prospective buyers.

    Leave it as it is.
    • Pumpkim
    • By Pumpkim 3rd Dec 17, 8:23 AM
    • 213 Posts
    • 254 Thanks
    Pumpkim
    I'm with your wife. As a buyer, a new kitchen would be a bonus but I wouldn't necessarily want to pay any more for the house because of it. I don't think youll get your money back on it.
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 3rd Dec 17, 8:26 AM
    • 14,270 Posts
    • 38,682 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    This ^

    I wouldn't buy a house with a brand-new kitchen if it wasn't to my taste because I'd feel awful about stripping out new cupboards and appliances while I wouldn't mind doing this for an old, tired kitchen.

    Is your buyer going to want a gas or electric hob? A single or double oven? Traditional cupboards or all deep drawers? Tiles or glass splash backs? Etc, etc.....
    Originally posted by Mojisola
    That's very much what I was thinking.

    It depends a little on whether the house is a "starter house" or a "further up the ladder" house. But on my last house (even though it was a "starter" house - ie 2 bedroom terrace) the EA told me not to bother to replace the kitchen and just price the house accordingly.

    When it comes to a "further up the ladder" house then Mojisola has a valid point - and yes...some people want gas hobs, some want electric induction, some want electric ceramic. I look ruefully at any new kitchens with single ovens in - as I want a double oven. I could live with (decent quality) painted units - but I couldnt live with "shiny" ones and so on and so on.

    My own kitchen is new this year and I can see that some would want to change my electric ceramic hob. Others would think "Where's the space for a dishwasher?". Most would be okay with my taste - but there are people that really wouldnt want what I've been told is obviously "Southern England city person".

    So - leave the kitchen.
    Last edited by moneyistooshorttomention; 03-12-2017 at 8:30 AM.
    New Year's Resolution already made -

    Don't get mad....get firm ...
    • seven-day-weekend
    • By seven-day-weekend 3rd Dec 17, 8:29 AM
    • 29,858 Posts
    • 55,854 Thanks
    seven-day-weekend
    We bought our bungalow because it was in the right place and the right price, and it was a bungalow.

    The kitchen was awful (no cupboards etc) and needed doing straight away. We didn't like the bathroom but it was serviceable and we lived with it for eighteen months.

    We did offer less than the asking price because there was so much other work needed doing.

    Another one to say, leave your kitchen as it is.
    To love someone is to learn the song in their heart and to sing it to them when they have forgotten it
    'I believe in Christianity as I believe that the sun has risen. Not only because I see it, but because I see everything by it': C.S. Lewis
    'Let me tell you this one thing. When you fall out, as you will, don't get blaming each other. Look inside yourself first'. - Hilda Ogden, to Sally on her wedding day to Kevin, Coronation Street 1986. '
    • Kynthia
    • By Kynthia 3rd Dec 17, 8:39 AM
    • 5,043 Posts
    • 7,024 Thanks
    Kynthia
    As others have said, I wouldn't pay for a new kitchen I didn't love than an old kitchen that needed replacing. Unless your house isn't going to sell without it I would just maximise what you have. If it's really bad then paint or replace the doors.

    Finish off those diy jobs and repairs, declutter and de-personalise to an extent, make sure you let the light in, don't forget your garden, and make any old fashioned or worn rooms feel newer and brighter with a lick of paint and some bright, coordinated accessories.
    Don't listen to me, I'm no expert!
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 3rd Dec 17, 9:32 AM
    • 30,858 Posts
    • 18,457 Thanks
    getmore4less

    My view is that with the modern age, we need to update the kitchen, as people will look online, just see a tired kitchen and move on. My wife thinks that people will still visit & try & knock us down in price.

    Thoughts?

    Thanks Mark
    Originally posted by isplumm
    you both agree it is all about the price so knock the £20k off and price to sell.

    There is a difference between tired and neglected, make sure it looks well maintained* and spotless so people know they can move in and live with it for a while


    Things like every door is still aligned properly, sealant is in good condition, all appliances working no dripping taps, lights all work....
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