Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@. Skimlinks & other affiliated links are turned on

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • mylegalthrowaway
    • By mylegalthrowaway 2nd Dec 17, 4:39 PM
    • 6Posts
    • 1Thanks
    mylegalthrowaway
    Thread no longer needed
    • #1
    • 2nd Dec 17, 4:39 PM
    Thread no longer needed 2nd Dec 17 at 4:39 PM
    Thanks for all your advice!
    Last edited by mylegalthrowaway; 03-12-2017 at 5:02 PM.
Page 1
    • Yorkshireman99
    • By Yorkshireman99 2nd Dec 17, 5:06 PM
    • 3,370 Posts
    • 2,730 Thanks
    Yorkshireman99
    • #2
    • 2nd Dec 17, 5:06 PM
    • #2
    • 2nd Dec 17, 5:06 PM
    How much money are here talking about? How is thevexecutor going to pay? It sounds quite ludicrous.
    • Margot123
    • By Margot123 2nd Dec 17, 5:09 PM
    • 291 Posts
    • 248 Thanks
    Margot123
    • #3
    • 2nd Dec 17, 5:09 PM
    • #3
    • 2nd Dec 17, 5:09 PM
    Are you estranged form the executor, are there any tensions, or do you simply just not know each other?
    If the answer to any of these questions is 'yes', then the executor is quite right to only issue the funds to you in person. This is in order to make sure they are only paying out to the correct beneficiaries.

    An alternative would be for them to verify your identity and address by you providing copies of photo ID and a utility bill by post (these can be certified by a solicitor at a cost to yourself). Perhaps you could suggest this? If acceptable, then it would be usual for the executor to issue you with a cheque.
    • mylegalthrowaway
    • By mylegalthrowaway 2nd Dec 17, 5:23 PM
    • 6 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    mylegalthrowaway
    • #4
    • 2nd Dec 17, 5:23 PM
    • #4
    • 2nd Dec 17, 5:23 PM
    Thread no longer needed
    Last edited by mylegalthrowaway; 03-12-2017 at 5:03 PM. Reason: Thread no longer needed
    • Margot123
    • By Margot123 2nd Dec 17, 5:30 PM
    • 291 Posts
    • 248 Thanks
    Margot123
    • #5
    • 2nd Dec 17, 5:30 PM
    • #5
    • 2nd Dec 17, 5:30 PM
    Perhaps their thoroughness is being interpreted as stubbornness.
    The role of executor is not as easy as people think, every box has to be ticked or they can be held personally liable for anything that goes wrong.
    • Yorkshireman99
    • By Yorkshireman99 2nd Dec 17, 5:36 PM
    • 3,370 Posts
    • 2,730 Thanks
    Yorkshireman99
    • #6
    • 2nd Dec 17, 5:36 PM
    • #6
    • 2nd Dec 17, 5:36 PM
    It might cost a few pounds but ask them to pay your solicitor. It might even be cheaper than travelling. If not a letter before action sent to them might bring them to their senses.
    • mylegalthrowaway
    • By mylegalthrowaway 2nd Dec 17, 5:43 PM
    • 6 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    mylegalthrowaway
    • #7
    • 2nd Dec 17, 5:43 PM
    • #7
    • 2nd Dec 17, 5:43 PM
    Thread no longer needed
    Last edited by mylegalthrowaway; 03-12-2017 at 5:03 PM.
    • mylegalthrowaway
    • By mylegalthrowaway 2nd Dec 17, 5:44 PM
    • 6 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    mylegalthrowaway
    • #8
    • 2nd Dec 17, 5:44 PM
    • #8
    • 2nd Dec 17, 5:44 PM
    Thread no longer needed
    Last edited by mylegalthrowaway; 03-12-2017 at 5:04 PM.
    • jackyann
    • By jackyann 2nd Dec 17, 7:27 PM
    • 3,271 Posts
    • 6,862 Thanks
    jackyann
    • #9
    • 2nd Dec 17, 7:27 PM
    • #9
    • 2nd Dec 17, 7:27 PM
    Yes, do ask a solicitor, especially if you have one you do business with - and try ringing around a bit.
    We had a similar situation - not a will - but money owed from an old transaction with complications - and the solicitor only charged us £5 (about 5 years ago). Other quoted a lot more (up to £250, which still might be cheaper than travelling) but this one quite rightly thought we might go back to them to do business - which we have.
    • unforeseen
    • By unforeseen 2nd Dec 17, 7:51 PM
    • 1,972 Posts
    • 2,483 Thanks
    unforeseen
    It might be that as there is some sort of tension between you, the executor doesn't trust you to provide a signed receipt that he requires unless it is handed over in person.
    • mylegalthrowaway
    • By mylegalthrowaway 2nd Dec 17, 7:52 PM
    • 6 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    mylegalthrowaway
    Thread no longer needed
    Last edited by mylegalthrowaway; 03-12-2017 at 5:04 PM.
    • mylegalthrowaway
    • By mylegalthrowaway 2nd Dec 17, 7:57 PM
    • 6 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    mylegalthrowaway
    Thread no longer needed
    Last edited by mylegalthrowaway; 03-12-2017 at 5:04 PM.
    • Margot123
    • By Margot123 3rd Dec 17, 9:36 AM
    • 291 Posts
    • 248 Thanks
    Margot123
    That might, indeed, be the case, but they already have it in writing from me that I guarantee to provide acknowledgement of receipt, so if that is the issue, it's a moot point.
    Originally posted by mylegalthrowaway
    A receipt is something you agree to do on promise after the event, and as there is this existing tension, I can see why the executor is unwilling.
    I had a similar situation whereby a beneficiary wanted a BACS transfer and refused a cheque, after consulting my solicitor, I was advised not to transfer the funds electronically for various reasons. Creating a paper trail was one, and possible diversion of funds was another (there were other more minor reasons).
    • Yorkshireman99
    • By Yorkshireman99 3rd Dec 17, 11:04 AM
    • 3,370 Posts
    • 2,730 Thanks
    Yorkshireman99
    A receipt is something you agree to do on promise after the event, and as there is this existing tension, I can see why the executor is unwilling.
    I had a similar situation whereby a beneficiary wanted a BACS transfer and refused a cheque, after consulting my solicitor, I was advised not to transfer the funds electronically for various reasons. Creating a paper trail was one, and possible diversion of funds was another (there were other more minor reasons).
    Originally posted by Margot123
    Absolutely correct. The cheque. if crossed A/C payee is a fairly, but not, certain, way of ensuring it goes to the correct recipient.
    • unforeseen
    • By unforeseen 3rd Dec 17, 12:31 PM
    • 1,972 Posts
    • 2,483 Thanks
    unforeseen
    But it does not provide a receipt for the executor, and where there appears to be a lack of trust on both sides then the executor is quite within their rights to insist on a method that guarantee one is provided.
    • Yorkshireman99
    • By Yorkshireman99 3rd Dec 17, 5:11 PM
    • 3,370 Posts
    • 2,730 Thanks
    Yorkshireman99
    But it does not provide a receipt for the executor, and where there appears to be a lack of trust on both sides then the executor is quite within their rights to insist on a method that guarantee one is provided.
    Originally posted by unforeseen
    Which a paid cheque provides. If it came to court that would suffice.
    • Keep pedalling
    • By Keep pedalling 3rd Dec 17, 6:04 PM
    • 4,066 Posts
    • 4,429 Thanks
    Keep pedalling
    Thanks for all your advice!
    Originally posted by mylegalthrowaway
    It’s considered bad form to delete content like this. You may not need the info but it might be useful to someone else luckily once posted it’s always still there in cyberspace

    http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=5754220

    Can the executor of a will dictate how a beneficiary receives their inheritance?

    I've been left a sum of money in my grandparent's will, but the executor of the will, who lives at the opposite end of the country, is demanding I meet them in person to collect the funds. I've told them this isn't possible, and suggested alternatives (BACS, cheque), but they're refusing to budge.

    Can they legally dictate how the money's transferred to me?
    • Margot123
    • By Margot123 3rd Dec 17, 6:39 PM
    • 291 Posts
    • 248 Thanks
    Margot123
    Would also be nice to know what the outcome has been.
    Has the situation been resolved, or does the OP have concerns they have identified themselves however unlikely?
    • SevenOfNine
    • By SevenOfNine 3rd Dec 17, 6:48 PM
    • 1,177 Posts
    • 1,126 Thanks
    SevenOfNine
    Perhaps either OP or the executor decided to be less stubborn & the situation is resolved.
    Seen it all, done it all, can't remember most of it.
    • jackyann
    • By jackyann 4th Dec 17, 9:17 AM
    • 3,271 Posts
    • 6,862 Thanks
    jackyann
    I don't think anything that OP has written identifies them. Even if the solution itself seemed very individual, they could have posted 'I'm afraid the solution might identify us'. Otherwise, as said, this thread is of no use to anyone else.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

350Posts Today

2,714Users online

Martin's Twitter
  • I realised I forgot in my links earlier. 1. Help to Buy ISAs, how they work and best buys...? https://t.co/BSCNPeqiVF

  • RT @whatdawndid: Thanks to uncle @MartinSLewis I just received £200 back, just like that from the student loan company! Turns out that the?

  • RT @LaraLewington: Shocked and saddened by Cheggers news. Working with him on It?s A Knockout was my 1st job in telly when I was just 19. H?

  • Follow Martin