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    • Beaut.bebe
    • By Beaut.bebe 2nd Dec 17, 11:36 AM
    • 3Posts
    • 1Thanks
    Beaut.bebe
    Gas leak advice!
    • #1
    • 2nd Dec 17, 11:36 AM
    Gas leak advice! 2nd Dec 17 at 11:36 AM
    Hey guys, sorry if I’ve picked the wrong thread! This seemed to fit best. So basically we found out yesterday that a gas engineer our estate agents sent round (we rent privately, me myself and my newborn twins) had left us with a gas leak when he fixed our hob last week. We thought we smelt gas on and off but when my parents came and mentioned it without us even saying anything about gas we knew we weren’t imagining it so called the EA to get someone out. Firstly they wanted use to wait four more days until the following Tuesday even though we said we could actually smell gas and had newborns in the property as well as ourselves. They then said they’d come the same day if they had time!! After much pushing by my husband, they agreed to come out that day and found a gas leak in the hob. They had to turn off the hob as they had no idea which part was leaking apparently. Unfortunately it was the same company so we are reticent whether they actually did the second job correctly or not!

    We took the twins to A&E where we spent 8 hours having my seven week old twins with cannulas in their arms and bloods being taken for carbon monoxide tests. Their second test results came back more acceptable and they were sent home thankfully. Myself and my husband then spent a further 6.5 hours getting ourselves checked, racking up huge car park charges in the process! We also were sent home with barely acceptable levels in our bloods.

    Bearing in mind we were sent home without any major issues, is it worth trying to bring a case against this company? For the fact that that man should be struck off the gas safety register alone but also for the emotional stress that my twins (although they won’t remember!) and myself went through. Seeing my seven week olds going through it all was quite distressing!? Any advice would be greatly appreciated! (Also, depending on the leak volume, our gas bill will surely be affected which I do not want to pay for!!).
Page 2
    • Typhoon2000
    • By Typhoon2000 2nd Dec 17, 2:49 PM
    • 778 Posts
    • 364 Thanks
    Typhoon2000
    Any ways, if your family had high level of CO if wasn't coming from the gas leak that you smelt. Capping off the hob won't help with carbon monoxide ( it well help prevent an explosion though).
    There must be a faulty working appliance ( boiler is usually the chief culprit) or a blocked chimney in your property. So I wouldn't go back without getting it investigated and finding the cause for the excess carbon monoxide.
    • JoJo1978
    • By JoJo1978 2nd Dec 17, 3:03 PM
    • 180 Posts
    • 175 Thanks
    JoJo1978
    OP it's a shame you have chosen to leave this thread because you have been given a whole heap of information that will be useful to you now and in the future.
    Hamster in the wheel (London) 1999-2017
    Mortgage free since 2015; Pension pot sorted 2017
    Second career (what TBD!) 2018
    • G_M
    • By G_M 2nd Dec 17, 3:16 PM
    • 42,280 Posts
    • 49,125 Thanks
    G_M
    Tenants are usually responsible for ther own gas bills.

    All gas bills prominantly display the emergency number for gas leaks. Having said that, where there's a leak on the user's side of the mains switch/meter, Tranco won't fix it - they'll just turn off the gas to make the property safe, and advise the user to get a Gassafe engineer in.

    A CO alarm is a sensible idea.
    • cjmillsnun
    • By cjmillsnun 2nd Dec 17, 3:25 PM
    • 346 Posts
    • 224 Thanks
    cjmillsnun
    G_M who are Transco? They haven't existed for over 10 years now.

    For all, because you will need to check their ID.

    This map from the ENA shows who your local distribution network is owned by. These are the people who will attend a gas emergency call.
    • bris
    • By bris 2nd Dec 17, 5:49 PM
    • 7,093 Posts
    • 6,110 Thanks
    bris
    For anyone that doesn't know it's a legal obligation to have a label on the gas meter with who to call when you smell gas. Common sense then tells your brain to turn of the gas with the lever at the meter.
    • AnotherJoe
    • By AnotherJoe 2nd Dec 17, 6:41 PM
    • 7,674 Posts
    • 8,286 Thanks
    AnotherJoe

    We took the twins to A&E where we spent 8 hours having my seven week old twins with cannulas in their arms and bloods being taken for carbon monoxide tests. Their second test results came back more acceptable and they were sent home thankfully. Myself and my husband then spent a further 6.5 hours getting ourselves checked, racking up huge car park charges in the process! We also were sent home with barely acceptable levels in our bloods.
    Originally posted by Beaut.bebe

    Why? Gas leak = nothing to do with carbon monoxide. What did you tell the hospital for them to do these unnecessary tests ?

    And if you really did have borderline levels of CO in your blood THEN THE PROBLEM IS LIKELY STILL THERE TURN THE GAS OFF AND GET THE GAS COMPANY IN
    Last edited by AnotherJoe; 02-12-2017 at 6:45 PM.
    • Aylesbury Duck
    • By Aylesbury Duck 2nd Dec 17, 8:14 PM
    • 1,196 Posts
    • 1,492 Thanks
    Aylesbury Duck
    I'm curious as to what the "barely acceptable levels [of, presumably CO?] in our bloods" was all about.
    • anselld
    • By anselld 2nd Dec 17, 8:20 PM
    • 5,429 Posts
    • 4,996 Thanks
    anselld
    I'm curious as to what the "barely acceptable levels [of, presumably CO?] in our bloods" was all about.
    Originally posted by Aylesbury Duck
    The % hemoglobin destroyed by combining with CO is measured.

    https://www.emedicinehealth.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=129669

    As others have said, completely pointless for a gas leak.
    • Aylesbury Duck
    • By Aylesbury Duck 2nd Dec 17, 8:30 PM
    • 1,196 Posts
    • 1,492 Thanks
    Aylesbury Duck
    But "barely acceptable"? That suggests that by coincidence there is a carbon monoxide source in the house, or it's an emotional descriptor crated by the OP to embellish the story.
    • tlc678910
    • By tlc678910 2nd Dec 17, 8:55 PM
    • 490 Posts
    • 877 Thanks
    tlc678910
    I recently used a breathalyser type device to test me for carbon monoxide in my pregnancy. My midwife brought it to the house. I scored zero (non smoker). I asked what levels my midwife had seen and I think she said up to 11 in a smoker. I don't know what the units mean.

    OP if your family have levels of carbon monoxide which concerned the medical staff get onto it - a leak can cause you to go to sleep and not wake up. I believe feeling very tired or flu like and headaches can be symptoms.

    Tlc
    • Pixie5740
    • By Pixie5740 2nd Dec 17, 8:57 PM
    • 11,198 Posts
    • 15,649 Thanks
    Pixie5740
    But "barely acceptable"? That suggests that by coincidence there is a carbon monoxide source in the house, or it's an emotional descriptor crated by the OP to embellish the story.
    Originally posted by Aylesbury Duck
    My money is on the latter.
    Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen pounds nineteen and six, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds nought and six, result misery.
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 2nd Dec 17, 9:06 PM
    • 2,013 Posts
    • 5,529 Thanks
    Red-Squirrel
    My money is on the latter.
    Originally posted by Pixie5740
    Its funny how different 'acceptable levels' sounds when you add a barely on the front!
    • EachPenny
    • By EachPenny 2nd Dec 17, 9:28 PM
    • 3,280 Posts
    • 6,040 Thanks
    EachPenny
    ...I’m not sure I’m going to get any advice that isn’t people just telling me I did the incorrect thing so won’t I check back again to this thread. If this is the pool of people available for friendly, non judgemental advice I’m not sure I’ll be using this site’s forums anymore either.
    Originally posted by Beaut.bebe
    Given the apparent confusion over the type of gas and the potential for there still being a problem with CO I think we have to hope the OP does check back, and those final words don't become prophetic

    Is it possible for someone on the forum team to send the OP an email?
    "In the future, everyone will be rich for 15 minutes"
    • Pixie5740
    • By Pixie5740 2nd Dec 17, 10:54 PM
    • 11,198 Posts
    • 15,649 Thanks
    Pixie5740
    Given the apparent confusion over the type of gas and the potential for there still being a problem with CO I think we have to hope the OP does check back, and those final words don't become prophetic

    Is it possible for someone on the forum team to send the OP an email?
    Originally posted by EachPenny
    I wouldn’t worry about the OP. The hospital sent them home because the levels of CO in their blood stream were acceptable. Bear in mind that the hospital will err on the side of caution so it’s unlikely the CO levels are anyway near high enough to cause harm.

    The OP has a “gas alarm” I take that to mean a CO alarm although I suppose it could turn out to be a toaster. If the CO levels in the property were dangerously high, in fact not even dangerously high but significant then the alarm would be triggered. The CO present in their blood could be down to smoking, passive smoking, pollution, vehicle exhausts or paint fumes.
    Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen pounds nineteen and six, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds nought and six, result misery.
    • Kynthia
    • By Kynthia 3rd Dec 17, 9:49 AM
    • 5,042 Posts
    • 7,023 Thanks
    Kynthia
    OP I'm sorry this situation scared you but this shouldn't have been a big traumatic event. It's not going to be the last time you think you smell gas in your home and most leaks are tiny where you aren't even sure you are smelling gas most of the time. You just call someone out and they fix it.

    Generally when you smell gas you don't turn on any lights or have a naked flame. If you can't get a gas safe engineer immediately then you ring the emergency number. They'll make the place safe until you can get an engineer out to make any repairs.

    While there was no need to go to hospital, with such a young baby I think many may have done the same. Perhaps the medical staff misunderstood the gas you were concerned about as generally people dont seek medical attention for natural gas. Carbon monoxide is not something you get from a gas leak but from boilers and gas heaters. Or perhaps they are under that misconception or were being over-cautious but that isn't the landlord or engineer's fault.

    If you think an engineer isn't registered with gas safe or is incompetent then report them to Gas Safe. Plus have at least one CO alarm in your house, preferably near the boiler, any gas heaters and perhaps one upstairs if that isn't where your boiler is (as we spend a long time asleep). It sounds like you already have an alarm which is great.
    Don't listen to me, I'm no expert!
    • G_M
    • By G_M 3rd Dec 17, 11:55 AM
    • 42,280 Posts
    • 49,125 Thanks
    G_M
    G_M who are Transco? They haven't existed for over 10 years now.
    Originally posted by cjmillsnun
    Does it matter?

    Whatever they are now called, their number will be on the gas bill (and as others have pointed out, on the meter and elsewhere).

    the name is hardly material...... (or should that be 'barely'....?)
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 3rd Dec 17, 12:18 PM
    • 2,013 Posts
    • 5,529 Thanks
    Red-Squirrel
    Does it matter?

    Whatever they are now called, their number will be on the gas bill (and as others have pointed out, on the meter and elsewhere).

    the name is hardly material...... (or should that be 'barely'....?)
    Originally posted by G_M
    Does it matter when people use 'DSS'?
    • 00ec25
    • By 00ec25 3rd Dec 17, 12:26 PM
    • 5,561 Posts
    • 4,958 Thanks
    00ec25
    Does it matter when people use 'DSS'?
    Originally posted by Red-Squirrel
    LOL, until this thread I did not know Transco no longer existed, as the last time we had a gas leak (2003) that's who I called as I was sensible enough to rate them as more relevant than calling Ghostbusters in the circumstances.

    Of course had the leak continued, Ghostbusters would have become relevant....
    • elsien
    • By elsien 3rd Dec 17, 12:28 PM
    • 15,423 Posts
    • 38,722 Thanks
    elsien
    They also don't mind being called out to check for gas leaks if you're unsure. Better safe than sorry. As I found out when I reported a gas leak when the problem was actually a bowlful of chopped up swede. (Long story, not entirely my fault. Honest.)
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 3rd Dec 17, 2:35 PM
    • 15,714 Posts
    • 14,030 Thanks
    AdrianC
    As I found out when I reported a gas leak when the problem was actually a bowlful of chopped up swede. (Long story, not entirely my fault. Honest.)
    Originally posted by elsien
    I'm sitting comfortably, and there's a cup of tea here, so feel free to go on...
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