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    • mrvillicus
    • By mrvillicus 1st Dec 17, 7:27 PM
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    mrvillicus
    Question about wall heating thermostat
    • #1
    • 1st Dec 17, 7:27 PM
    Question about wall heating thermostat 1st Dec 17 at 7:27 PM
    I have quite an old heating system which comprises of an old gas boiler (1991) radiators with non thermostatic valves and a wall mounted thermostat in my hallway.

    I understand the wall stat controls the boiler to turn on or off once the set temperature is achieved however my stat only reaches 19, if I go below 19 it clicks and turns the boiler off so as far as I can gather it'll only set the temp to 19 or above, is this normal?
Page 1
    • boliston
    • By boliston 1st Dec 17, 7:30 PM
    • 2,452 Posts
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    boliston
    • #2
    • 1st Dec 17, 7:30 PM
    • #2
    • 1st Dec 17, 7:30 PM
    I find hallway thermostats are pretty useless and just use them as an on/off switch - the temperature control on the boiler itself is far more accurate for temperature setting
    • elsien
    • By elsien 1st Dec 17, 7:36 PM
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    elsien
    • #3
    • 1st Dec 17, 7:36 PM
    • #3
    • 1st Dec 17, 7:36 PM
    Is it because the temperature in the room where the thermostat is is always above 19?
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
    • mrvillicus
    • By mrvillicus 1st Dec 17, 7:36 PM
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    mrvillicus
    • #4
    • 1st Dec 17, 7:36 PM
    • #4
    • 1st Dec 17, 7:36 PM
    As my boiler is so old all it has is a knob which ranges from 1-5 so I'm guessing that controls the water temperature?
    • mrvillicus
    • By mrvillicus 1st Dec 17, 7:38 PM
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    mrvillicus
    • #5
    • 1st Dec 17, 7:38 PM
    • #5
    • 1st Dec 17, 7:38 PM
    The wall stat actually clicks though at 19 so it's as if this is it's preset setting or something but to answer your question I would guess the temp drops below 19 especially at night
    • boliston
    • By boliston 1st Dec 17, 7:46 PM
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    boliston
    • #6
    • 1st Dec 17, 7:46 PM
    • #6
    • 1st Dec 17, 7:46 PM
    As my boiler is so old all it has is a knob which ranges from 1-5 so I'm guessing that controls the water temperature?
    Originally posted by mrvillicus
    My boiler (about 13 years old) only has a knob to control radiator temperature - the water is always quite hot even if the radiator temperature knob is kept very low (i live in a top floor flat which does not require really hot radiators, even in cold weather)
    • nofoollikeold
    • By nofoollikeold 2nd Dec 17, 4:07 PM
    • 66 Posts
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    nofoollikeold
    • #7
    • 2nd Dec 17, 4:07 PM
    • #7
    • 2nd Dec 17, 4:07 PM
    Thermostats click when you turn the dial through the temperature of the room. If you want to see how accurate it is, use an accurate thermometer to measure the temperature, then see if the thermostat clicks at that temperature. On some of them you can remove the knob and replace it at a position so that what is indicated is the actual temperature.

    They are generally only accurate to about +- 2 or 3 degrees, although some are better.
    • Ectophile
    • By Ectophile 3rd Dec 17, 12:08 AM
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    Ectophile
    • #8
    • 3rd Dec 17, 12:08 AM
    • #8
    • 3rd Dec 17, 12:08 AM
    The idea of a thermostat is that you select the temperature you want, then just leave it alone.

    When the temperature in that room drops below the temperature you've set, the heating comes on. When it goes above that temperature, the heating goes off.

    They aren't particularly accurate. But you should be able to find the setting that is comfortable you, whether it's accurate or not.
    If it sticks, force it.
    If it breaks, well it wasn't working right anyway.
    • boliston
    • By boliston 3rd Dec 17, 12:55 AM
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    boliston
    • #9
    • 3rd Dec 17, 12:55 AM
    • #9
    • 3rd Dec 17, 12:55 AM
    The idea of a thermostat is that you select the temperature you want, then just leave it alone.

    When the temperature in that room drops below the temperature you've set, the heating comes on. When it goes above that temperature, the heating goes off.

    They aren't particularly accurate. But you should be able to find the setting that is comfortable you, whether it's accurate or not.
    Originally posted by Ectophile
    I find that I often feel "hot" or "cold" but it's not always exactly related to the room temperature, so I have always switched on the heating if I'm hot and switched it off if I'm cold - I'm not keen on auto control as it could come on when I'm out (or asleep) and waste energy
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 3rd Dec 17, 8:42 AM
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    getmore4less
    One critical factor with thermostats is the range they switch on/off and the hysteresis of the system.

    if they don't match you can get swings in the temp bigger than the "comfortable" range.

    as the room(s) get cooler you want the heating to come on in time to warm up and start heating before it gets too cold and when warming up to switch off before it gets too warm as it carries on heating for a bit.

    with a traditional(old) setup the controller does the timings(on/off) and the thermostat sets a temp.
    You have to guess when to turn it on and when to turn it off to get your core time around the right temps.

    Things have moved on and these days(also a simple upgrade to an older system) is a programmable thermostat.

    With these you can set multiple time/temp combinations

    Many now have some built in compensation to do start up and coll down periods.
    often have tighter control over the temp range and some are adjustable so you can better match your system

    They have holiday modes so if away you can turn the heating off and set it on just before you come back.

    and they have other useful features(like boost) and some you never use.

    most of us have fairly predictable lives so can find setting that work and override for the times when you go off routine, most have at least 2 separate days type so you can do say Mo-Fri & Sat-Sun, and there are 7 day options so you can do each day differently.

    an example of what you might do is have the heating come on in the morning to get up and get ready, if you do out turn it off, or if you are at home might drop the temp a bit because you are doing stuff, early afternoon back up to norm for the kids coming home or coming home from work, a little warmer for sitting watching TV and then down quite low(not off) overnight to stop it getting too cold.
    ------------------------

    The boiler temp control is to adjust the amount of heat you can get into/out of the system not to control the temperature of the rooms.
    • Ectophile
    • By Ectophile 3rd Dec 17, 8:50 PM
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    Ectophile
    I find that I often feel "hot" or "cold" but it's not always exactly related to the room temperature, so I have always switched on the heating if I'm hot and switched it off if I'm cold - I'm not keen on auto control as it could come on when I'm out (or asleep) and waste energy
    Originally posted by boliston
    I just rely on a combination of a thermostat and timeswitch. For most of the year, I don't touch it, even in Summer. I might knock the thermostat down a few degrees if I'm going away, but that's about it.
    If it sticks, force it.
    If it breaks, well it wasn't working right anyway.
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 4th Dec 17, 8:12 AM
    • 30,749 Posts
    • 18,376 Thanks
    getmore4less
    I find that I often feel "hot" or "cold" but it's not always exactly related to the room temperature, so I have always switched on the heating if I'm hot and switched it off if I'm cold - I'm not keen on auto control as it could come on when I'm out (or asleep) and waste energy
    Originally posted by boliston
    The trick is to have the stat set in the bottom end of your comfort range, and use a boost option

    Out or asleep that is what the timer is for.

    The next upgrade is to have different temps at different times

    I have a min in the winter when in 15c
    when away for morethan a days 5c

    Our comfort seems to be around 19c on the stat at 18c it feels a touch nippy for the OH.
    Temperature Hysteresis +- 0.3c
    Our boost cycle is set to 1c for 1hr

    At 5:00am I have a preheat cycle to bring it up to 18c if it dropped below overnight.

    At 6:30 I bring it up to 18.5c

    At 7:00-10:30 set to 19c
    if we go out earlier we can stop the cycle early
    if we stay in we can do a boost or start the next cycle early.

    At 18:30-20:00 set to 19c
    if going out in the evening we can skip that cycle

    At 20:00-23:30 19c a carry over or a rewarm if we went out.

    The goals are
    heating off if not there or asleep,
    warm house when we come home or wake up.
    • castle96
    • By castle96 7th Dec 17, 12:53 PM
    • 1,619 Posts
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    castle96
    I have a cheap looking ELITE thermostat which I keep having to turn up/down to get the heating to come on constantly. As far as I remember, there are just two wires connected to the back. When I look in, eg B&Q, there is a baffling variety of thermo, and price range/complication/programable.
    Will all of the accept just the two wires, and still work ?
    I just want something that is mre sensitive and keeps the heating on without me haveing to get up/down all the time.
    (Linked to a Glowrom combi 8 yrs old)
    • Le_Kirk
    • By Le_Kirk 7th Dec 17, 1:48 PM
    • 2,216 Posts
    • 1,126 Thanks
    Le_Kirk
    If there are only two wires, that generally means it is battery operated with volt-free contacts and the power comes from the boiler through the contacts in the thermostat. When the temperature is below the setting, the relay operates, makes the contact and sends power back to the boiler. When the temperature reaches set point, the relay de-energises cutting off power to the boiler. Many of the replacement thermostats use a common back-plate so can be substituted one for another.

    Why do you need to keep jumping up and down to adjust the thermostat. Decide the temperature that you want the room - say 19 deg, set the thermostat to 19 deg and leave it. When the room heats up, the thermostat will switch off the boiler until the room cools down. If, when the boiler has shut down, the room temperature is not to your liking, turn the thermostat up "slightly" until it clicks. Once you have found your comfort temperature, leave the thermostat alone!
    • castle96
    • By castle96 7th Dec 17, 3:00 PM
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    castle96
    There is no battery.

    I have to manually click up the thermo, as otherwise it does nothing. That would be the same at 19 or 29....
    • TheCyclingProgrammer
    • By TheCyclingProgrammer 7th Dec 17, 3:07 PM
    • 2,902 Posts
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    TheCyclingProgrammer
    I find hallway thermostats are pretty useless and just use them as an on/off switch - the temperature control on the boiler itself is far more accurate for temperature setting
    Originally posted by boliston
    I'm sure this has already been said, but the temperature control on the boiler controls the temperature of the water in the heating system, not the house temperature. If your room thermostat doesn't work properly, get a new one.
    • TheCyclingProgrammer
    • By TheCyclingProgrammer 7th Dec 17, 3:08 PM
    • 2,902 Posts
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    TheCyclingProgrammer
    There is no battery.

    I have to manually click up the thermo, as otherwise it does nothing. That would be the same at 19 or 29....
    Originally posted by castle96
    Sounds like you need a new one.
    • castle96
    • By castle96 7th Dec 17, 4:24 PM
    • 1,619 Posts
    • 275 Thanks
    castle96
    "but the temperature control on the boiler controls the temperature of the water in the heating system"

    I have 2 on the boiler, one for each.

    "need a new one" - yes, hence my questions........
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