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  • FIRST POST
    • meggles
    • By meggles 1st Dec 17, 12:25 PM
    • 194Posts
    • 13Thanks
    meggles
    BT Engineer Scam
    • #1
    • 1st Dec 17, 12:25 PM
    BT Engineer Scam 1st Dec 17 at 12:25 PM
    ARGH. I'm in the US travelling. My husband is in the UK. He had a phone call with a 'BT engineer' and he gave them access to our computer. They have purchased amazon gift cards, etc....


    He's gone to his bank and cancelled card. I've changed all the passwords on email accounts, bank accounts, credit cards. Working my way through other things.


    I'm now concerned as he gave them access to our webcam and they took a picture of his driving license and his UK passport.


    What do I do? Credit Check reports? How do I report positive identify threat?


    Our computer is now offline, and I'll take it to our computer engineer to do a full wipe tomorrow (when I'm back in the UK).
Page 1
    • marliepanda
    • By marliepanda 1st Dec 17, 12:33 PM
    • 4,863 Posts
    • 9,809 Thanks
    marliepanda
    • #2
    • 1st Dec 17, 12:33 PM
    • #2
    • 1st Dec 17, 12:33 PM
    First of all, send someone round to remove your husbands access to anything with a plug. He clearly cannot be trusted.

    Secondly, are you suggesting not only did he allow a BT engineer access to his computer (why would they need that) he also help up his driving license and passport to the camera for them?
    Survey Earnings 2017 - £163
    • meggles
    • By meggles 1st Dec 17, 12:36 PM
    • 194 Posts
    • 13 Thanks
    meggles
    • #3
    • 1st Dec 17, 12:36 PM
    • #3
    • 1st Dec 17, 12:36 PM
    Oh yes... I love my husband and he's a great guy. But he's scared of technology and it really flusters him. I feel horrible for him as he's 3000 miles away in the UK shaking and crying. I'll save my unplugging til I get home tomorrow.


    Yes.... he held up his driving license & passport for them to take a picture of. Seriously wtf does that.


    I assume my next port of call is to set BOTH of us up for credit report checking service. reading through martin's guide now.
    • PaulW922
    • By PaulW922 2nd Dec 17, 9:02 AM
    • 785 Posts
    • 302 Thanks
    PaulW922
    • #4
    • 2nd Dec 17, 9:02 AM
    • #4
    • 2nd Dec 17, 9:02 AM
    You can get a voluntary CIFAS marker against your names at the credit agencies. CIFAS is an anti-fraud system for the financial sector. It is principally there to protect lenders against fraudulent applications but it can also be used to protect you.

    Where someone has been a victim of ID fraud you can get CIFAS to flag your credit file. This means that any future applications where a credit or ID check is required will be flagged and thrown out of the automated account opening process. The bank, phone company or whoever will then examine the application manually.

    It does mean that opening a new product, evening a savings account (as these do still require ID checks even though they are not credit scored) may take longer than usual but it is probably worth the inconvenience.

    Lenders and other providers are not allowed to take the voluntary CIFAS marker in account when making a credit assessment (ie it should not hit your chances of obtaining credit, but just mean that instant in store type of credit is referred for further checks).

    https://www.cifas.org.uk
    • IAmWales
    • By IAmWales 2nd Dec 17, 2:07 PM
    • 1,831 Posts
    • 3,817 Thanks
    IAmWales
    • #5
    • 2nd Dec 17, 2:07 PM
    • #5
    • 2nd Dec 17, 2:07 PM
    First of all, send someone round to remove your husbands access to anything with a plug. He clearly cannot be trusted.

    Secondly, are you suggesting not only did he allow a BT engineer access to his computer (why would they need that) he also help up his driving license and passport to the camera for them?
    Originally posted by marliepanda
    That's not kind. If you'd seen/ heard how these people work you might be more understanding. This won't have been a five minute conversation, they'll have drawn him in and convinced him that someone was going to take everything off him. Middle and older age men are the most vulnerable group to this, and the damage it can do is far more than financial.

    meggles, is there someone that can visit your husband today, give him some reassurance? Do you have adult children?

    One thing you need to be aware of is that he'll now be on a list of targets, they know he is vulnerable so he'll receive even more calls. Whatever you do make sure he feels able to speak up in future, in case he is led into this situation again.

    For anyone that thinks this is funny, or seeks to judge this person, please keep in mind that people have killed themselves as a result of this kind of abuse. It's not funny, it's not stupidity, it's a fraud that plays to a deep psychological level.
    • GothicStirling
    • By GothicStirling 2nd Dec 17, 2:51 PM
    • 985 Posts
    • 725 Thanks
    GothicStirling
    • #6
    • 2nd Dec 17, 2:51 PM
    • #6
    • 2nd Dec 17, 2:51 PM
    Back when I had BT Broadband I did have to allow them to remotely access my computer to fix a fault, so it's not a stupid thing that the OP's husband has done as some think. The argument to get across to people is to never give financial information and security details to anyone who has contacted you. If in doubt, hang up and contact the company from a different line.
    • meggles
    • By meggles 2nd Dec 17, 3:33 PM
    • 194 Posts
    • 13 Thanks
    meggles
    • #7
    • 2nd Dec 17, 3:33 PM
    • #7
    • 2nd Dec 17, 3:33 PM
    Thanks everyone - I arrived back in the UK today. My iphone has now been hacked (didn't get a chance to change iTunes account yesterday).


    I'm so pleased that I'm back today. He's pleased that we're working it out together. Yes, I am angry at him. But, he was the victim. I'm so proud that he told me within the hour instead of hiding it or waiting until I got home. That gave me the chance to protect more things.


    It's really knocked his confidence. This morning when I arrived at LHR, I couldn't use my cell phone as the hackers at got in. I called him on a payphone, but he wouldn't pick up as he didn't know the number.


    I'm looking for some support groups or internet security blogs, etc...
    • Tarambor
    • By Tarambor 2nd Dec 17, 4:28 PM
    • 1,740 Posts
    • 1,194 Thanks
    Tarambor
    • #8
    • 2nd Dec 17, 4:28 PM
    • #8
    • 2nd Dec 17, 4:28 PM
    It surprises me you can't use your mobile phone to make a call. I'd be interested to know how that has happened.
    • sourcrates
    • By sourcrates 2nd Dec 17, 4:31 PM
    • 12,668 Posts
    • 12,000 Thanks
    sourcrates
    • #9
    • 2nd Dec 17, 4:31 PM
    • #9
    • 2nd Dec 17, 4:31 PM
    That's not kind. If you'd seen/ heard how these people work you might be more understanding. This won't have been a five minute conversation, they'll have drawn him in and convinced him that someone was going to take everything off him. Middle and older age men are the most vulnerable group to this, and the damage it can do is far more than financial.

    meggles, is there someone that can visit your husband today, give him some reassurance? Do you have adult children?

    One thing you need to be aware of is that he'll now be on a list of targets, they know he is vulnerable so he'll receive even more calls. Whatever you do make sure he feels able to speak up in future, in case he is led into this situation again.

    For anyone that thinks this is funny, or seeks to judge this person, please keep in mind that people have killed themselves as a result of this kind of abuse. It's not funny, it's not stupidity, it's a fraud that plays to a deep psychological level.
    Originally posted by IAmWales
    Its not only the old and middle aged, i know people who would fall for this scam, quite young, well respected business owners, who, unfortunately, will believe almost anything you tell them.

    Some people are just wired that way, wear-as i am suspicious of absolutely everyone and everything.

    My advice, question everything, and never, ever give your financial or ID information to anyone on the phone.
    I'm a Board Guide on the Debt-Free Wannabe, Credit File And Ratings, and
    Bankruptcy And Living With It, boards. "I volunteer to help get your forum questions answered and keep the forum running smoothly".
    Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an abusive or illegal post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com. Any views are mine and not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.com.

    For free debt advice, contact either : Stepchange, National Debtline, or, CAB.
    For Legal advice see : http://legalbeagles.info/
    • Bedsit Bob
    • By Bedsit Bob 2nd Dec 17, 4:33 PM
    • 9,833 Posts
    • 51,599 Thanks
    Bedsit Bob
    Back when I had BT Broadband I did have to allow them to remotely access my computer to fix a fault, so it's not a stupid thing that the OP's husband has done as some think.
    Originally posted by GothicStirling
    Perhaps not, but showing them your Driving Licence and Passport
    My job is Top Secret. Even I don't know what I'm doing.

    Amount I have so far denied the BBC - £1161
    • Lorian
    • By Lorian 2nd Dec 17, 4:42 PM
    • 4,122 Posts
    • 2,257 Thanks
    Lorian
    If you/he have used the same passwords on any other sites, even ones not yet compromised, then change them now.

    Also set up two factor authentication on Amazon, Ebay, Paypal, iTunes.
    • meggles
    • By meggles 3rd Dec 17, 1:14 PM
    • 194 Posts
    • 13 Thanks
    meggles
    Thanks - yes, I'm going through account by account changing every password. Using password generator for any account that stores credit card etc. And setting up 2 - step generation. I've now learned that my dear husband bypassed 2-step genereation by giving the scammers the codes as they came through on his phone.


    I feel horrible that I never really explained what 2-step verification was and how important it was. He didn't understand.


    I'm also looking at upgrading phone with one that blocks numbers... tricky as I'm American and get a lot of legit foreign calls, but we'll find a way.


    Thank you all.
    • robber2
    • By robber2 3rd Dec 17, 1:35 PM
    • 283 Posts
    • 229 Thanks
    robber2
    Meggles, if its a landline and you are with BT I cannot recommend Call Guardian /Truecall to highly.


    http://www.expertreviews.co.uk/bt/bt8500

    This system screens and /or blocks all incoming calls and has made a huge difference to our lives. I think we have had one cold call in the last 18 months .

    good luck

    Rob
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 3rd Dec 17, 1:40 PM
    • 10,031 Posts
    • 8,090 Thanks
    lincroft1710
    I've had the BT Broadband calls several times and even if you say you're with another BB provider they will insist that BT provides all the cabling (or similar). Fortunately I know this is untrue, so I put the phone down
    • macman
    • By macman 3rd Dec 17, 2:33 PM
    • 41,418 Posts
    • 17,040 Thanks
    macman
    I've had the BT Broadband calls several times and even if you say you're with another BB provider they will insist that BT provides all the cabling (or similar). Fortunately I know this is untrue, so I put the phone down
    Originally posted by lincroft1710
    But it is true. BT maintains the local loop from exchange to property, so if there is an issue there, it is BT Openreach who will attend to fix it, regardless of who your line rental/broadband fee is paid to.
    Scammers will usually claim to be with BT or TT, simply because they are the two with the largest customer base.
    No free lunch, and no free laptop
    • robber2
    • By robber2 3rd Dec 17, 3:12 PM
    • 283 Posts
    • 229 Thanks
    robber2
    But it is true. BT maintains the local loop from exchange to property, so if there is an issue there, it is BT Openreach who will attend to fix it, regardless of who your line rental/broadband fee is paid to.
    Originally posted by macman
    Not if you live in Hull
    • cajef
    • By cajef 3rd Dec 17, 3:45 PM
    • 4,579 Posts
    • 3,638 Thanks
    cajef
    Or if you have Virgin cable.
    I used to have a handle on life, but it broke.
    • Bedsit Bob
    • By Bedsit Bob 3rd Dec 17, 3:52 PM
    • 9,833 Posts
    • 51,599 Thanks
    Bedsit Bob
    Or if you have Virgin cable.
    Originally posted by cajef
    Virgin cable?

    Would that be cable, that has never had a signal inserted into it?
    My job is Top Secret. Even I don't know what I'm doing.

    Amount I have so far denied the BBC - £1161
    • Ganga
    • By Ganga 4th Dec 17, 5:35 PM
    • 864 Posts
    • 426 Thanks
    Ganga
    I had a call today from "TALKTALK " they have called several times in the last few weeks,usually tell them to get lost and hang up,today i said " oh your from talktalk are you? his answer YES,I HAVE A BANANA TO SHOVE UP YOUR AR----LE,i was gobsmacked,have blocked the number but will wait to see if the scammers call back,cheeky b-----s.
    ITS NOT EASY TO GET EVERYTHING WRONG ,I HAVE TO WORK HARD TO DO IT!
    • glentoran99
    • By glentoran99 4th Dec 17, 5:40 PM
    • 4,915 Posts
    • 3,919 Thanks
    glentoran99
    Had this call the other day I think "Hello this is BT I need to talk to you about your internet connection, The security has been compromised"


    Strange... it was I'm with virgin
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