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    • MrsT88
    • By MrsT88 1st Dec 17, 12:08 PM
    • 4Posts
    • 3Thanks
    MrsT88
    Damp and Timber report
    • #1
    • 1st Dec 17, 12:08 PM
    Damp and Timber report 1st Dec 17 at 12:08 PM
    Hi, first time poster here so any advice would be more than appreciated!!

    We are currently in the process of selling our home and our buyers lenders- Nationwide- have requested a damp and timber report. I have just had a free inspection from a local firm who have used a damp meter and basically said most of our walls in the house have rising damp. This has come as quite a shock as there is no evidence on any of these walls of any damp. I kindly pointed this out to the guy who grumpily said Ďdo you want me to do it or notí which as you can image was not helpful!! The house is a 1900 mid terraced. Iím a bit stumped as to what to do next- Iím aware most houses of this age will have some damp issues but I canít help but feel Iíve been taken for a ride! We canít get hold of the valuation so not sure as to what was put on that either. Any help would be appreciated!!!
    Thank you!
Page 1
    • kingstreet
    • By kingstreet 1st Dec 17, 12:13 PM
    • 32,390 Posts
    • 17,392 Thanks
    kingstreet
    • #2
    • 1st Dec 17, 12:13 PM
    • #2
    • 1st Dec 17, 12:13 PM
    You need an inspection and report by someone who gets paid for doing inspections and reports and not for installing damp courses and plastering.

    http://www.independentdampsurveyors.co.uk/
    I am a mortgage broker. You should note that this site doesn't check my status as a Mortgage Adviser, so you need to take my word for it. This signature is here as I follow MSE's Mortgage Adviser Code of Conduct. Any posts on here are for information and discussion purposes only and shouldn't be seen as financial advice. Please do not send PMs asking for one-to-one-advice, or representation.
    • Surrey_EA
    • By Surrey_EA 1st Dec 17, 12:13 PM
    • 1,316 Posts
    • 1,590 Thanks
    Surrey_EA
    • #3
    • 1st Dec 17, 12:13 PM
    • #3
    • 1st Dec 17, 12:13 PM
    You've had a free inspection from a company who make their living by installing damp proofing treatments, and they have identified your property as suffering, which is not a complete shock.

    You may be better advised to have an inspection from an independent damp surveyor, but this will cost you something in the region of £200-£250. But you are likely to find a more accurate assessment of any problems that may exist.
    • MrsT88
    • By MrsT88 1st Dec 17, 12:21 PM
    • 4 Posts
    • 3 Thanks
    MrsT88
    • #4
    • 1st Dec 17, 12:21 PM
    • #4
    • 1st Dec 17, 12:21 PM
    That’s great thank you! Anyone heard of rising damp without any signs of it?
    • kingstreet
    • By kingstreet 1st Dec 17, 12:51 PM
    • 32,390 Posts
    • 17,392 Thanks
    kingstreet
    • #5
    • 1st Dec 17, 12:51 PM
    • #5
    • 1st Dec 17, 12:51 PM
    You can get high moisture readings from walls due to leaky rainwater goods, soil level bridging damp-course, leaky roof, chimney flashing issues.

    Most of it is nothing to do with needing a new damp course and is rectified by much less expensive remedies.
    I am a mortgage broker. You should note that this site doesn't check my status as a Mortgage Adviser, so you need to take my word for it. This signature is here as I follow MSE's Mortgage Adviser Code of Conduct. Any posts on here are for information and discussion purposes only and shouldn't be seen as financial advice. Please do not send PMs asking for one-to-one-advice, or representation.
    • daveyjp
    • By daveyjp 1st Dec 17, 12:57 PM
    • 7,197 Posts
    • 5,602 Thanks
    daveyjp
    • #6
    • 1st Dec 17, 12:57 PM
    • #6
    • 1st Dec 17, 12:57 PM
    If you are selling it is down to the buyer to sort out any additional surveys over and above valuation survey.

    Tell Nationwide it is for the buyer to sort these surveys themselves, but you won't be taking much notice of any report produced from a free survey by a 'timber and damp expert'.
    • amateur house
    • By amateur house 1st Dec 17, 9:51 PM
    • 253 Posts
    • 216 Thanks
    amateur house
    • #7
    • 1st Dec 17, 9:51 PM
    • #7
    • 1st Dec 17, 9:51 PM
    My survey said the house I am buying had rising damp. I paid for a damp & timber survey (not independent as they quoted for the work needed). They said damp was due to the ground level outside being too high, which they said had caused woodworm in the floorboards. There is no sign of damp, so I am suspicious.
    • dlmcr
    • By dlmcr 1st Dec 17, 11:25 PM
    • 135 Posts
    • 173 Thanks
    dlmcr
    • #8
    • 1st Dec 17, 11:25 PM
    • #8
    • 1st Dec 17, 11:25 PM
    "Rising Damp" although it can exist is an almost mythical beast in reality and is used as a catch all phrase by surveyors walking around with meters that they don't understand how to use or interpret, in order to then fuel the mostly fraudster filled rising damp prevention industry products that are peddled.
    Current house we bought apparently had "rising damp" in the survey, after moving in no sign of any damp whatsoever. Same with last house.
    "Damp" is caused by moisture getting into the walls and not being able to get out. A bit of common sense and observation should be able to determine in most situations why it exists and so how to rectify it.
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