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  • FIRST POST
    • ComputeAngel
    • By ComputeAngel 30th Nov 17, 11:18 PM
    • 119Posts
    • 17Thanks
    ComputeAngel
    Wardrobe cuttings
    • #1
    • 30th Nov 17, 11:18 PM
    Wardrobe cuttings 30th Nov 17 at 11:18 PM
    Hi all,

    I have purchased IKEA wardrobes without measuring the height of the room. Unfortunately, the height of my room is smaller than height of wardrobes so need to cut the wardrobes.

    My question to you guys. Is this something that can be done easily by a person who is not that good in DIY. and what tools do I need?

    Many thanks for reading and replying.

    Regards
Page 1
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 1st Dec 17, 6:22 AM
    • 30,837 Posts
    • 18,443 Thanks
    getmore4less
    • #2
    • 1st Dec 17, 6:22 AM
    • #2
    • 1st Dec 17, 6:22 AM
    can't you take them back and find ones that do fit?

    If you want to keep them....

    Which ones need to see the build the fixings?

    How much shorter do you need to make them?
    The first decision will depend on construction do you trim top or bottom

    you could trim the uprights and move all the fixings into the new ends.
    (depending how much it getting trimmed this may or may not work)
    this may require drill bits to make new holes for the fixings.

    or just trim the uprights and fix the other bits to them with chipboard screws, often furniture fixings or inset nuts work better.

    The carcase will probably look OK but the doors may not as they tend to be finished top/bottom.


    for trimming I find a circular saw works best(quick and with the right blade usually neat and straight.

    Usefull to have a way to clamp them together and do them all with a single cut getting them all the same lenght

    next best would be a good hand saw.

    getting straight lines with a jigsaw is much harder.
    • Gloomendoom
    • By Gloomendoom 1st Dec 17, 8:00 AM
    • 13,262 Posts
    • 17,481 Thanks
    Gloomendoom
    • #3
    • 1st Dec 17, 8:00 AM
    • #3
    • 1st Dec 17, 8:00 AM
    for trimming I find a circular saw works best(quick and with the right blade usually neat and straight.
    Originally posted by getmore4less
    Remember to have the "good" side facing down if you use a circular saw.

    next best would be a good hand saw.
    Good side facing up.

    I bought some wardrobes that were too high for one of our rooms. My wife had measured the room without taking a ceiling beam into account. The top four inches or so of the wardrobe height consisted of a moulded ornamental cornice. Rather than notch it around the beam I cut the whole thing down by two inches with a hand saw. Looks fine.
    Advice; it rhymes with mice. Advise; it rhymes with wise.
    • Aylesbury Duck
    • By Aylesbury Duck 1st Dec 17, 11:20 AM
    • 1,205 Posts
    • 1,505 Thanks
    Aylesbury Duck
    • #4
    • 1st Dec 17, 11:20 AM
    • #4
    • 1st Dec 17, 11:20 AM
    Hi all,

    I have purchased IKEA wardrobes without measuring the height of the room. Unfortunately, the height of my room is smaller than height of wardrobes so need to cut the wardrobes.

    My question to you guys. Is this something that can be done easily by a person who is not that good in DIY. and what tools do I need?

    Many thanks for reading and replying.

    Regards
    Originally posted by ComputeAngel
    I'd exchange them. If you haven't got the DIY experience or the tools to do the job, it will be an expensive way to learn DIY.
    • Cisco001
    • By Cisco001 1st Dec 17, 11:58 AM
    • 2,731 Posts
    • 1,165 Thanks
    Cisco001
    • #5
    • 1st Dec 17, 11:58 AM
    • #5
    • 1st Dec 17, 11:58 AM
    I did it myself with no DIY experience few years ago.
    tools I used was marker pen, right angle ruler, measuring tape and Jigsaw

    It worth buying £20 cheap Jigsaw
    I tried hand saw,not work for me...
    Last edited by Cisco001; 01-12-2017 at 12:05 PM.
    • Aylesbury Duck
    • By Aylesbury Duck 1st Dec 17, 12:31 PM
    • 1,205 Posts
    • 1,505 Thanks
    Aylesbury Duck
    • #6
    • 1st Dec 17, 12:31 PM
    • #6
    • 1st Dec 17, 12:31 PM
    I did it myself with no DIY experience few years ago.
    tools I used was marker pen, right angle ruler, measuring tape and Jigsaw

    It worth buying £20 cheap Jigsaw
    I tried hand saw,not work for me...
    Originally posted by Cisco001
    I'd question that. My grandfather and father always taught me that when you need to buy a new tool for a job, to get the best you can afford, not the cheapest. Cheap tools are a sure-fire way to a bodged job or worse, an injury. I've stuck to their advice and the tools I've bought over many years of car and home ownership have served me well and have lasted. Buy cheap, buy twice.
    • Cisco001
    • By Cisco001 1st Dec 17, 2:40 PM
    • 2,731 Posts
    • 1,165 Thanks
    Cisco001
    • #7
    • 1st Dec 17, 2:40 PM
    • #7
    • 1st Dec 17, 2:40 PM
    I'd question that. My grandfather and father always taught me that when you need to buy a new tool for a job, to get the best you can afford, not the cheapest. Cheap tools are a sure-fire way to a bodged job or worse, an injury. I've stuck to their advice and the tools I've bought over many years of car and home ownership have served me well and have lasted. Buy cheap, buy twice.
    Originally posted by Aylesbury Duck
    It depends on how often you use the tools.
    I bought a cheap Jigsaw as I knew that I probably only use it by once in the foreseeable future. (I did use it 3 times within 5 years...)

    I don't see the point of spending something like £50 on tools when a flatpack wardrobe are so cheap these day. £150 may be?

    BTW, cheap tools doesn't necessary mean compromising safety.
    It is depends on how you handle the tools!
    A cheap power tool could mean it only has basic function, nothing fancy.
    • Witless
    • By Witless 1st Dec 17, 3:09 PM
    • 561 Posts
    • 2,193 Thanks
    Witless
    • #8
    • 1st Dec 17, 3:09 PM
    • #8
    • 1st Dec 17, 3:09 PM
    I'd question that. My grandfather and father always taught me that when you need to buy a new tool for a job, to get the best you can afford, not the cheapest. Cheap tools are a sure-fire way to a bodged job or worse, an injury. I've stuck to their advice and the tools I've bought over many years of car and home ownership have served me well and have lasted. Buy cheap, buy twice.
    Originally posted by Aylesbury Duck
    Very true. But use once? Buy cheap.
    • Aylesbury Duck
    • By Aylesbury Duck 1st Dec 17, 3:21 PM
    • 1,205 Posts
    • 1,505 Thanks
    Aylesbury Duck
    • #9
    • 1st Dec 17, 3:21 PM
    • #9
    • 1st Dec 17, 3:21 PM
    BTW, cheap tools doesn't necessary mean compromising safety.
    It is depends on how you handle the tools!
    A cheap power tool could mean it only has basic function, nothing fancy.
    Originally posted by Cisco001
    True. I should clarify my comment. Some very cheap hand tools do compromise safety. Saw blades that break easily, screwdrivers that blunt quickly and cause slips, etc are things I've experienced when I've had to resort to using friends' or relatives' tools to help them out at short notice. I agree that a lower-priced power tool might just reflect its limited functions but I would argue it's better to think ahead to possible future uses so that you're not back at the shop buying another drill in a year's time because the one you bought cheaply last year didn't have a hammer action or a reverse mode or something else you now need. As Witless says, if you know you're going to use something just the once, fair enough, but that is surely a rare occurrence (unless you're very old! Even then, some of my best tools are hand-me-downs.)
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