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    • Ms W
    • By Ms W 30th Nov 17, 11:14 PM
    • 2Posts
    • 3Thanks
    Ms W
    WW2 lifestyle in 2018
    • #1
    • 30th Nov 17, 11:14 PM
    WW2 lifestyle in 2018 30th Nov 17 at 11:14 PM
    Hello,
    I am looking for a list of rations that came under the points system, as I am trying to simplify our diet as well as having a very limited budget to live on. I have read the books etc all about weekly and monthly rations on say meat, butter, sugar etc, but it is the 'extras' that's you bought with the points system i.e.canned goods. I wondered if there is a list anywhere or if anyone can add any points that they know for certain items.
    Was it 20 points per person per month?
    Thank you for your help in advance
    Ms W x
Page 1
    • amandaatnumber7
    • By amandaatnumber7 1st Dec 17, 6:37 AM
    • 150 Posts
    • 1,495 Thanks
    amandaatnumber7
    • #2
    • 1st Dec 17, 6:37 AM
    • #2
    • 1st Dec 17, 6:37 AM
    Sorry I can't help but I'm interested to follow your journey
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    • tori.k
    • By tori.k 1st Dec 17, 6:50 AM
    • 2,926 Posts
    • 6,681 Thanks
    tori.k
    • #3
    • 1st Dec 17, 6:50 AM
    • #3
    • 1st Dec 17, 6:50 AM
    Ralph W Hill did a great piece on the BBC people's war
    Some of his memories are 24 points per person a month ( this varied due to time of year and availability) points were by tin or pound weight.
    Rice 8
    Sardines 2
    Baked beans 2
    Sultanas 8
    Skimmed milk 5
    Currants 16
    Biscuits ( dry) 2 sweet 4
    Herrings 2
    Stewed steak. 20
    Rolled oats 2
    Sausage meat 12
    Chopped ham 3 per oz
    Small tin of red salmon 32.
    I suppose in a way keep a no way similar but simple menu in our house hold, meals are built around seasonal fresh produce with very little processed foods but 2oz of cheese is a sandwich in this house never mind a weeks supply.
    Good luck
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    • Caterina
    • By Caterina 1st Dec 17, 7:14 AM
    • 5,730 Posts
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    Caterina
    • #4
    • 1st Dec 17, 7:14 AM
    • #4
    • 1st Dec 17, 7:14 AM
    Have a look at this wonderful blog: https://the1940sexperiment.com
    Finally I'm an OAP and can travel free (in London at least!).
    • AndyCF
    • By AndyCF 1st Dec 17, 12:18 PM
    • 198 Posts
    • 513 Thanks
    AndyCF
    • #5
    • 1st Dec 17, 12:18 PM
    • #5
    • 1st Dec 17, 12:18 PM
    Not sure if its related to the above but about a year or so ago the BBC did have an hour long program where they did a 'traditional' type of Christmas dinner, using ingredients from that time period such as only certain variety of potato etc.

    Similar with the meat too from what I recall. I do remember they said the cost was very high to obtain said varieties of each 'item' but they went to great lengths to ensure that for example the potato's were grown using said 'from that time' methods and varieties.

    From memory they then served two dinners, one 'up to date' and one 'traditional older style ingredients' and I think most preferred the older one for taste.

    I can't remember any more details on it, other than it was about an hour long and a single part program.

    I would guess some of the "not bright orange" carrots might of caused a few moments
    • luxor4t
    • By luxor4t 1st Dec 17, 3:22 PM
    • 10,034 Posts
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    luxor4t
    • #6
    • 1st Dec 17, 3:22 PM
    • #6
    • 1st Dec 17, 3:22 PM
    This thread might be of interest: http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.html?t=481412
    I can cook and sew, make flowers grow.
    • Linda32
    • By Linda32 1st Dec 17, 6:34 PM
    • 4,110 Posts
    • 9,120 Thanks
    Linda32
    • #7
    • 1st Dec 17, 6:34 PM
    • #7
    • 1st Dec 17, 6:34 PM
    I second Thriftlady's experiment. I often go back to read it.
    • Ms W
    • By Ms W 1st Dec 17, 10:42 PM
    • 2 Posts
    • 3 Thanks
    Ms W
    • #8
    • 1st Dec 17, 10:42 PM
    • #8
    • 1st Dec 17, 10:42 PM
    thank you for your help in the ration points system, will also go and read the blog.
    • VfM4meplse
    • By VfM4meplse 2nd Dec 17, 12:35 AM
    • 24,221 Posts
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    VfM4meplse
    • #9
    • 2nd Dec 17, 12:35 AM
    • #9
    • 2nd Dec 17, 12:35 AM
    Marguerite Patten is welll known as the doyenne of WW2 home economics. She's written several books about different stages of her life. I'd be tempted to read on now, were it not for the fact that its currently buried under at least 600 others
    Value-for-money-for-me-puhleeze!

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    • Primrose
    • By Primrose 2nd Dec 17, 8:54 PM
    • 7,886 Posts
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    Primrose
    A really interesting read, albeit a very bulky one, is Austerity Britain by the historian David Kynnaston. He gives a very detailed explanation of all aspects of domestic and British economic life in the late war and post war period.
    Reading back on the points system allocated for certain foodstuffs you can understand why having a tin of stewed beef or a tin of salmon was the equivalent to having a pot of gold stored in your larder. Small wonder that they were saved up for very special occasions !
    • monnagran
    • By monnagran 2nd Dec 17, 9:18 PM
    • 3,214 Posts
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    monnagran
    Indeed, opening a tin of salmon was akin to carving a chicken at Christmas.

    I do remember my mother getting hold of some jelly crystals and keeping them for my birthday. I never did have a party on my birthday but I'll always remember the year I had jelly for tea.

    It was one thing having points to spend but quite another to find goods in the shop to spend them on. If word got around that a certain shop had something in stock that was very scarce, the most enormous queues formed immediately. It was a well known joke that if you saw a queue you joined it, hopeful that it would be for something really nice.
    I don't recall it myself but one Christmas my mother queued for over 2 hours to buy a small bar of chocolate for my stocking. On Christmas Eve there was an air raid warning and we all had to go down to the cellar. Mum managed to smuggle my stocking down as well, not knowing how long we would have to stay there. During the night a mouse nibbled through my stocking and right through the bar of chocolate.
    The adults were so upset for me that my grandmother cut round the hole that the mouse had made and I ate the rest of it.
    Unbelievable!
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    • Primrose
    • By Primrose 2nd Dec 17, 9:50 PM
    • 7,886 Posts
    • 26,857 Thanks
    Primrose
    I remember some years after the war had ended, a local factory for some weird reason decided to test its Air Raid Siren at 1 pm on a Sunday without giving any advance public warning.

    At that very moment my mother had opened the oven door and was pulling a hot meat casserole dish out of the oven. She was absolutely poleaxed with shock - (once you’ve heard an air raid siren at close quarters you never ever forget the sound of one) that she immediately dropped the casserole dish. It smashed and the hot contents spilt all over the floor. My mother was in a terrible state of shock for the remainder of the day and we had no Sunday lunch.
    • qwert yuiop
    • By qwert yuiop 2nd Dec 17, 9:58 PM
    • 2,138 Posts
    • 1,248 Thanks
    qwert yuiop
    Marguerite Patten is welll known as the doyenne of WW2 home economics. She's written several books about different stages of her life. I'd be tempted to read on now, were it not for the fact that its currently buried under at least 600 others
    Originally posted by VfM4meplse
    She died at 99 a couple of years ago. I wonder did she stick to her diet?
    • Bedsit Bob
    • By Bedsit Bob 2nd Dec 17, 10:26 PM
    • 9,841 Posts
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    Bedsit Bob
    I remember an episode of Goodnight Sweetheart, where Gary and Yvonne (his modern day wife) are eating cheese omelettes, and he's explaining how much of the 1940s ration they were eating.

    Gary: It's weird how we take eggs for granted, isn't it?

    Yvonne: Where did that come from?

    Gary: I was just thinking, if this was 1940, we'd be eating six weeks rations of fresh eggs, fried in a weeks worth of butter, with approximately a months cheese ration, and yet they say the national diet was healthier during the war.
    My job is Top Secret. Even I don't know what I'm doing.

    Amount I have so far denied the BBC - £1161
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