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  • FIRST POST
    • mro
    • By mro 30th Nov 17, 8:33 PM
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    mro
    Ubuntu Linux -how do I check drives ?
    • #1
    • 30th Nov 17, 8:33 PM
    Ubuntu Linux -how do I check drives ? 30th Nov 17 at 8:33 PM
    I installed Ubuntu Linux on laptop.

    How I check Drives/Partitions available, space available etc. like in Windows Explorer ?

    I can see following.


Page 1
    • marty2be2000
    • By marty2be2000 30th Nov 17, 9:27 PM
    • 193 Posts
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    marty2be2000
    • #2
    • 30th Nov 17, 9:27 PM
    • #2
    • 30th Nov 17, 9:27 PM
    Maybe I am old school, but I would simply open a terminal session and then type:

    df -kl

    Terminal is like windows command prompt. Remember the commands are case sensitive so enter as all lower case. df will give you a text rendition of mounted local partitions and their usage.
    • debitcardmayhem
    • By debitcardmayhem 30th Nov 17, 9:43 PM
    • 8,300 Posts
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    debitcardmayhem
    • #3
    • 30th Nov 17, 9:43 PM
    • #3
    • 30th Nov 17, 9:43 PM
    Maybe I am old school, but I would simply open a terminal session and then type:

    df -kl

    Terminal is like windows command prompt. Remember the commands are case sensitive so enter as all lower case. df will give you a text rendition of mounted local partitions and their usage.
    Originally posted by marty2be2000
    Me too, however if you right click on a folder then select properties then you will see more info for the folder, but note the total free space is for the underlying partition (much like windows does)

    In a terminal as above you can see more for each folder by using command line commands

    e.g. in the terminal you will normally be in your "home" folder
    thus enter this
    du -s * | sort -n
    you will get something like this
    Code:
    244    mo.pdf
    248    fred
    1216    contract2.pdf
    2884    contract1.pdf
    3444    picss-2.jpg
    3496    Ice Cream Maker.pdf
    3744    picss-1.jpg
    15108    godmode.pdf
    issuing df gives something like this
    Code:
    Filesystem     1K-blocks      Used Available Use% Mounted on
    devtmpfs         4006476         0   4006476   0% /dev
    tmpfs            4018668     49784   3968884   2% /dev/shm
    tmpfs            4018668      1828   4016840   1% /run
    tmpfs            4018668         0   4018668   0% /sys/fs/cgroup
    /dev/sdb5       47346452  22681156  22237188  51% /
    tmpfs            4018668      3112   4015556   1% /tmp
    /dev/sdb2          98304     34422     63882  36% /boot/efi
    /dev/sda3      603710160 207959964 365013812  37% /home
    tmpfs             803732        16    803716   1% /run/user/42
    tmpfs             803732        48    803684   1% /run/user/1000
    /dev/mmcblk0p1  62351356  10024876  52326480  17% /run/media/rob/2AAFE8604AEF1252
    Windows is OK but using powershell or cmd you can do much more, the same is true for linux.

    Don't be put off by the fact that ubuntu is not like Windows , there is much to learn if you wish to explore , but the folks on here can help. I prefer fedora but it's not for the novice
    Last edited by debitcardmayhem; 30-11-2017 at 9:47 PM.
    • DCFC79
    • By DCFC79 30th Nov 17, 10:25 PM
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    DCFC79
    • #4
    • 30th Nov 17, 10:25 PM
    • #4
    • 30th Nov 17, 10:25 PM
    I prefer fedora but it's not for the novice
    Originally posted by debitcardmayhem
    Can I just interject, you say Fedora isnt for the novice, which 1 would you say is for for the novice ?
    Can people stop loaning money/being a guarator to family/friends, it rarely ends well and you lose out as your money is gone or you get shafted with being a guarantor.
    • debitcardmayhem
    • By debitcardmayhem 30th Nov 17, 10:38 PM
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    debitcardmayhem
    • #5
    • 30th Nov 17, 10:38 PM
    • #5
    • 30th Nov 17, 10:38 PM
    Can I just interject, you say Fedora isnt for the novice, which 1 would you say is for for the novice ?
    Originally posted by DCFC79
    Perhaps mint or zorin, but to be honest learning some command line stuff and be prepared for a learning curve. However I wouldn't suggest Windows for a novice either even tablets/phones have a getting used to them period. Perhaps I was hasty in saying fedora not for the novice , any "new to you" tech has to be learnt.
    • AllTheseUserNamesAreTaken
    • By AllTheseUserNamesAreTaken 1st Dec 17, 11:29 AM
    • 16 Posts
    • 7 Thanks
    AllTheseUserNamesAreTaken
    • #6
    • 1st Dec 17, 11:29 AM
    • #6
    • 1st Dec 17, 11:29 AM
    Go to the start menu and type in 'disks'. There should be a program in there called 'Disks' that will show you what disks and partitions are set up.
    • Tarambor
    • By Tarambor 1st Dec 17, 12:23 PM
    • 1,751 Posts
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    Tarambor
    • #7
    • 1st Dec 17, 12:23 PM
    • #7
    • 1st Dec 17, 12:23 PM
    There's no need to use the command line as much as there used to be. The only time I have to resort to the command line is to fix one of the many issues a Linux distro can have. Pretty much everything is easier and quicker to do in a GUI.
    • esuhl
    • By esuhl 1st Dec 17, 2:34 PM
    • 7,778 Posts
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    esuhl
    • #8
    • 1st Dec 17, 2:34 PM
    • #8
    • 1st Dec 17, 2:34 PM
    There's no need to use the command line as much as there used to be. The only time I have to resort to the command line is to fix one of the many issues a Linux distro can have. Pretty much everything is easier and quicker to do in a GUI.
    Originally posted by Tarambor
    Rubbish -- there are so many things that are easier to do in a command prompt. A lot of GNU/Linux apps don't even have a GUI.
    • S0litaire
    • By S0litaire 1st Dec 17, 3:31 PM
    • 3,358 Posts
    • 2,128 Thanks
    S0litaire
    • #9
    • 1st Dec 17, 3:31 PM
    • #9
    • 1st Dec 17, 3:31 PM
    *tip*
    use 'df -h' (the -h means "human readable" so it sticks from bytes into Mb/Gb/Tb as applicable:

    Code:
    bill@Giga:~$ df -h
    Filesystem         Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    udev               4.9G     0  4.9G   0% /dev
    tmpfs              995M   48M  947M   5% /run
    /dev/sda2           55G   28G   25G  54% /
    tmpfs              4.9G   36M  4.9G   1% /dev/shm
    tmpfs              5.0M  4.0K  5.0M   1% /run/lock
    tmpfs              4.9G     0  4.9G   0% /sys/fs/cgroup
    /dev/sda1          511M  4.6M  507M   1% /boot/efi
    /dev/sdb1          1.8T  844G  893G  49% /home
    /dev/sdc           2.7T  1.9T  670G  75% /home/bill/V1/Plex
    Laters

    Sol

    "Have you found the secrets of the universe? Asked Zebade "I'm sure I left them here somewhere"
    • mro
    • By mro 1st Dec 17, 4:08 PM
    • 615 Posts
    • 618 Thanks
    mro
    Go to the start menu and type in 'disks'. There should be a program in there called 'Disks' that will show you what disks and partitions are set up.
    Originally posted by AllTheseUserNamesAreTaken
    Yes, I found that.

    I wanted to check if there was hidden partitions/partitioned/unformatted space as I deleted partitions and merged long time ago, then installed Ubuntu. There were 3 partitions before (199MB, 76GB, 520GB). Wasn't sure how this had worked out.


    • mro
    • By mro 1st Dec 17, 4:15 PM
    • 615 Posts
    • 618 Thanks
    mro
    Also found Disk Usage Analyser.


    • debitcardmayhem
    • By debitcardmayhem 1st Dec 17, 4:28 PM
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    debitcardmayhem
    sudo fdisk -l , or use gparted if gui is your thing
    • Tarambor
    • By Tarambor 2nd Dec 17, 5:23 PM
    • 1,751 Posts
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    Tarambor
    Rubbish -- there are so many things that are easier to do in a command prompt. A lot of GNU/Linux apps don't even have a GUI.
    Originally posted by esuhl
    What the OP wanted to do isn't quicker in CLI. It is three mouse clicks in most distros and you get a nice graphical display to look at instead of information that doesn't even align with the column headers. Create a shortcut to the disks application on the taskbar and it is a single click. Whilst you're still typing in a command and trying to remember what the arguments you need to use with it are I'm already looking at the information I want.

    My last job was at a company that wrote bespoke software and for Linux. I spent a year in an environment when I sat there waiting for someone far more au fait with Linux take far longer to do something than I did using GUI tools on the same distro.

    I actually watched with some amusement one of the guys trying to set up internet connection sharing via CLI, something which is three, maybe four mouse clicks in Network Manager. He gave up. I watched another guy edit a SQL database in CLI and it was just like watching someone pull teeth. The number of times I witnessed people having to re-enter commands because they'd forget that there was a capital letter involved or they'd make a spelling mistake etc.
    Last edited by Tarambor; 02-12-2017 at 5:26 PM.
    • esuhl
    • By esuhl 2nd Dec 17, 7:13 PM
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    esuhl
    What the OP wanted to do isn't quicker in CLI.
    Originally posted by Tarambor
    What's that got to do with anything? You said that, "Pretty much everything is easier and quicker to do in a GUI".

    That's simply wrong.
    • DCFC79
    • By DCFC79 2nd Dec 17, 7:50 PM
    • 30,419 Posts
    • 19,230 Thanks
    DCFC79
    Perhaps mint or zorin, but to be honest learning some command line stuff and be prepared for a learning curve. However I wouldn't suggest Windows for a novice either even tablets/phones have a getting used to them period. Perhaps I was hasty in saying fedora not for the novice , any "new to you" tech has to be learnt.
    Originally posted by debitcardmayhem
    Thanks, have used Linux for a few hours just to see what it was like, have a copy of Fedora and Mint somewhere just haven't tried them again due to time.
    Can people stop loaning money/being a guarator to family/friends, it rarely ends well and you lose out as your money is gone or you get shafted with being a guarantor.
    • Tarambor
    • By Tarambor 3rd Dec 17, 12:12 PM
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    Tarambor
    Thanks, have used Linux for a few hours just to see what it was like, have a copy of Fedora and Mint somewhere just haven't tried them again due to time.
    Originally posted by DCFC79
    When trying it out try to avoid the biggest obstacle which makes things harder for a lot of people which is to stop thinking about how you'd do something in Windows. Whilst it may look similar in many respects it isn't and does things quite differently. When I first started many years ago I got on a whole lot faster when I stopped doing that.
    • Tarambor
    • By Tarambor 3rd Dec 17, 12:14 PM
    • 1,751 Posts
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    Tarambor
    What's that got to do with anything? You said that, "Pretty much everything is easier and quicker to do in a GUI".

    That's simply wrong.
    Originally posted by esuhl
    Well there's one thing that is quicker to do in CLI and that is put people off Linux by making them think that everything is better done in CLI like a third of a century of progress in personal desktop computing hasn't happened.
    • debitcardmayhem
    • By debitcardmayhem 3rd Dec 17, 12:25 PM
    • 8,300 Posts
    • 6,260 Thanks
    debitcardmayhem
    Well there's one thing that is quicker to do in CLI and that is put people off Linux by making them think that everything is better done in CLI like a third of a century of progress in personal desktop computing hasn't happened.
    Originally posted by Tarambor
    That maybe, but not venturing outside of the hand holding GUI, doesn't teach much either. I suppose it's horses for courses.
    • esuhl
    • By esuhl 3rd Dec 17, 4:55 PM
    • 7,778 Posts
    • 5,580 Thanks
    esuhl
    Well there's one thing that is quicker to do in CLI and that is put people off Linux by making them think that everything is better done in CLI like a third of a century of progress in personal desktop computing hasn't happened.
    Originally posted by Tarambor
    The quickest thing to put someone off Linux is by giving silly advice suggesting that they should avoid using the CLI! Why make life hard for yourself by refusing to type a simple command?

    It's like saying that books are obsolete, what with several decades of progress with "moving pictures".

    And why keep changing your argument just so you can find some way to criticise Linux? It's completely irrelevant to the OP's question. If you can't learn how to use Linux, stick with Windows.
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