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  • FIRST POST
    • GlasweJen
    • By GlasweJen 30th Nov 17, 2:15 PM
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    GlasweJen
    The 20%
    • #1
    • 30th Nov 17, 2:15 PM
    The 20% 30th Nov 17 at 2:15 PM
    It looks like Iím one of the exclusive 20% club. A random payment to my account indicates that Iíve been awarded standard daily living during a mandatory reconsideration. Thank you everyone who supported me on the journey, until next time.
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Page 2
    • GlasweJen
    • By GlasweJen 9th Dec 17, 11:50 PM
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    GlasweJen
    Pleased to hear Op that you've had some success at MR. I suppose you'll have to weigh up on the appeal option and that is hard to advise on when there's real human impacts as well as technical considerations to think of. Good luck.

    On this point made... there certainly is that attitude out there and belief that this is the case. I have always been inclined to go along with that thinking... but I'm sitting here at ungodly hour of the morning and thinking... hmm.. actually... I don't necessarily agree with convention after all. I think we are extremely poor at comprehending mental illness beyond the stereotypical. PIP and WCA (for ESA) assessments mirror that where mental state exams set out to look for ridiculously simplified symptoms. I think mental illness is easier to fake because people open the door to being victim to fakery. I have long suffered mental illness and I would be extremely confident someone would find it difficult to fake serious mental illness in my presence over a period of hours or more. Like a lot of sufferers you can be extremely well embedded in concealing symptoms and that too is something I'd be consciously aware of if looking for indicators... many MI sufferers are engaged in a ritualised act throughout your interaction. I'm yet to meet a medical professional who I felt even deserved to be in the same room as me with them as the expert... none have impressed me with their skills/experience. Their insight has been fairly useless to truth... there's a complete lack of imagination. Into the context of these assessments you are in the lap of the gods sat opposite a nurse at a PC. You have to laugh before you cry when thinking that they'll be looking for signs of shaking to spot indicators of anxiety in someone with 30 years experience of hiding symptoms of anxiety... that's in the few moments they actually look at you and can probably only see half your body.

    In the end fakery success is a two way process... it takes one to try it... and one to readily receive it. The system is set up for superficial exploration of truth.... it may be that some have to fake things to get correctly assessed but I would not advise it.
    Originally posted by Muttleythefrog
    To be honest I think the entire face to face assessment thing is nonsense. What useful information can be gleaned in an interview that canít be taken from a form and a GP letter? Iíve only ever had 2 assessments and one was a complete shambles, I was reported to have walked up a flight of stairs, the other just produced a report that was incomprehensible.

    Somehow the DWP didnít query the idea that a paraplegic walked up a flight of stairs, the many reports from consultants both at home and abroad stood for nothing against the word of a nurse who had met me for 45 minutes and had actually stated earlier in her report that I was a wheelchair bound paraplegic. It took a doctor at a tribunal to point out the ridiculousness of the situation, of course a paraplegic qualifies for high mobility, Iím sorry but if people like me donít qualify then who the hell does?

    Quite frankly the DM suggesting that sitting down will somehow mitigate the risk of my collapsing and injuring myself when cooking swings from being a huge insult to being hilarious. Iím always sitting down, Iíve not stood up for a bloody decade, sometimes I think these idiots donít know how to connect the dots.
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    • Ames
    • By Ames 10th Dec 17, 12:09 AM
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    Ames
    Aren't the questions at the f2f exactly the same as the ones on the form? It does seem like a complete waste of time and money. I can understand a physical exam, but just asking 'can you remember what you wrote a couple of months ago' doesn't seem to be much of an assessment. Especially since I imagine all fraudsters will have the nous to re read what they put before going to the 'assessment'.

    As for danger of collapsing when cooking, wasn't there a tribunal ruling last year that even if the chance of it happening is small, the impact was so great that the claimant should be judged as never being able to do it?

    And doesn't sitting down make it more dangerous in general - you can't leap out of the way if you pull a pan of boiling liquid onto yourself, and it'd take longer to get to the sink to treat a burn.

    'Common Sense' clearly isn't a requirement in the job description.
    Unless I say otherwise 'you' means the general you not you specifically.
    • GlasweJen
    • By GlasweJen 10th Dec 17, 10:12 AM
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    GlasweJen
    Aren't the questions at the f2f exactly the same as the ones on the form? It does seem like a complete waste of time and money. I can understand a physical exam, but just asking 'can you remember what you wrote a couple of months ago' doesn't seem to be much of an assessment. Especially since I imagine all fraudsters will have the nous to re read what they put before going to the 'assessment'.

    As for danger of collapsing when cooking, wasn't there a tribunal ruling last year that even if the chance of it happening is small, the impact was so great that the claimant should be judged as never being able to do it?

    And doesn't sitting down make it more dangerous in general - you can't leap out of the way if you pull a pan of boiling liquid onto yourself, and it'd take longer to get to the sink to treat a burn.

    'Common Sense' clearly isn't a requirement in the job description.
    Originally posted by Ames
    I should just put lids on stuff when I microwave it. Don’t know about your microwave but mine blows lids off if you press them on firmly. You’re meant to just use lids to cover the food to prevent it splattering everywhere, not to secure hot food in containers to make it safe for spakkers like me.

    Going to chuck in an appeal and see how far it goes, I mean I do have a neurologists letter which states “Jennifer can open a packet of crisps and can of cola if required but cannot prepare any hot food or beverages despite extensive neurological rehabilitation. Even using modern technology such as adapted kettles and microwaves cannot make these tasks safe as Jennifer suffers from seizures which are unable to be controlled despite extensive input at home and abroad over the last 25 years”. The DM then over rode the DWPs own medical report in a blatant attempt to game their own system, how can that even be allowed to happen? Complaint going in lol.
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    • dori2o
    • By dori2o 13th Jan 18, 8:40 AM
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    dori2o
    OP. I'm happy to see that the tide is finally turning for you in terms of dealing with the DWP.

    With regards the inevitable discussion regarding the supposed ease if faking mental illness, I find the whole mental illness fakery thing a complete red herring, and the Gov uses its usual mouthpieces (daily mail, sun and torygraph) to convince the weak minded that everyone is faking illness to claim benefits. Thus allowing them to deny people with mental illness from receiving the help and support, medocal and financial, that they should be getting.

    It also means that an ever increasing number of people begin to dismiss mental illness issues as being nothing serious to worry about.

    We see the affects of u treated mental illness every day. Walk around any large town or city and the number of homeless has severely increased these past 7 years. Most of these people have significant mental illness issues.

    I have sufferred with depression for over 10 years. Its a consequence of being in severe pain 24/7. But I try my hardest to mask it everyday, and Ive become quite good at it when out in public.

    On my own however I cant cope. I dread being at home alone and I panic when it happens.

    My mental state has declined since our teenage daughter died in 2016, but whenever someone asks me how I/we are doing, I (and my wife does the same) always answer the same way. 'I' m OK. We're getting there.' or' I'm fine. Just taking each day as it comes'.

    What people dont see is me crying most days at work, or at home. Picking up my guitar and not being able to play certain songs she'd sing along to. Having panic attacks. Being unable to breathe. Having recurring dreams about finding her walking down the street and attempting to bring her home, only to wake up as we get to the door of our house. Thats the reason I've currently been up since 4.30am this morning.

    Not sleeping, not eating, not socialising. And all the time I/we are doing this (I know my wife cries in private) we continue to answer the questions of 'how are you doing' etc with 'I/we are fine' or 'We' re getting there' etc. But I'm not really, and neither is Mrs D.

    I have counselling but it doesnt provide a solution to the problem. I continue to hide it. I dont go to the GP. I just prefer to be at work and keep myself busy

    I was going to update my PIP award. Tell the DWP my mental state had significantly decreased, but was advised not to by a colleague who used to work for DWP and dealt with PIP claims.

    To the DWP this change in my mental health is temporary. Within 6 months of her death I'd be considered to no longer be sufferring mentally as a result of the loss.

    The truth is I wont ever be right mentally again. But I'll continue to wear this mask.

    People just see depression now as the modern day version of the 80's 'yuppie flu'. A very real illness (chronic fatigue disorder/ME) that people dont understand and dont believe exists.

    I've had people tell me/us that we'll got over this and be back to 'normal' soon.

    My wife has had a manager at work tell her that she needs to 'get over it. It' s been almost 12 months since the loss of your daughter, you should now start thinking more about what you want to achieve here at work . Thats more important'. (This from a childless woman).

    I'm not looking for sympathy. I dont care what anyone thinks of me. But what would be nice is understanding, and for people to realise that mental health is a real and significant issue that does affect people, is debilitating, causes other health issues, is a real illness and is disabling in many cases.

    Whilst I dont disagree that some people look to play the system, they do it not just with mental illnesses but with lots of medical issues. But certainly it is not 'easy' to fake, and not everyone sufferring those issues is faking.

    More needs to be done in hospitals/nhs, with social care, etc to ensure that people with these issues get the help they desperately need. That includes giving people more than 6 sessions of treatment.

    More also needs to be done to ensure these people have equal access to benefits where applicable. My physical health problems (chronic pain/reduced mobility/side effects of very strong opioid medication, etc) create barriers for me, but this past 18 months my mental condition has been just as, if not more debiliitating.
    To equate judgement and wisdom with occupation is at best . . . insulting.
    • nicetomeetyou
    • By nicetomeetyou 13th Jan 18, 3:05 PM
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    nicetomeetyou
    A GP wouldn't be able to diagnoses Bipolar, it would have to come from secondary mental health services and you would have to see a psychiatrist and it's not diagnosed straight away. The psychiatrist would have to see the manic highs and lows.
    • nannytone
    • By nannytone 13th Jan 18, 5:19 PM
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    nannytone
    I completed my Pip forms this week. I had help from a professional organisation and wish I hadn't bothered. I am blind and have a guide dog yet she kicked no to mobility issues because I haven't got a mental impairment. It was only at the point of signing the form when I asked about the planning and following a journey section that she realised she's made a mistake. I fully expect to be turned down and will need to appeal and I'm really not surprised because I wouldn't give me an award based on those forms
    • Ames
    • By Ames 13th Jan 18, 8:53 PM
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    Ames
    I completed my Pip forms this week. I had help from a professional organisation and wish I hadn't bothered. I am blind and have a guide dog yet she kicked no to mobility issues because I haven't got a mental impairment. It was only at the point of signing the form when I asked about the planning and following a journey section that she realised she's made a mistake. I fully expect to be turned down and will need to appeal and I'm really not surprised because I wouldn't give me an award based on those forms
    Originally posted by nannytone
    Can you do your own forms? It sounds as though you know more than the advisor (sadly quite common thanks to cutbacks to services). Maybe you can type/use your software and then someone can proof read it to check for obvious typos?
    Unless I say otherwise 'you' means the general you not you specifically.
    • dori2o
    • By dori2o 13th Jan 18, 9:07 PM
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    dori2o
    I completed my Pip forms this week. I had help from a professional organisation and wish I hadn't bothered. I am blind and have a guide dog yet she kicked no to mobility issues because I haven't got a mental impairment. It was only at the point of signing the form when I asked about the planning and following a journey section that she realised she's made a mistake. I fully expect to be turned down and will need to appeal and I'm really not surprised because I wouldn't give me an award based on those forms
    Originally posted by nannytone
    Part of the problem now is you get so little time to fill them in you dont have the opportunity to seek advice from more than 1 person or group to make the best effort possible.

    I know some people will say why do you need time to fill in a form, but by the time you get your dates sorted out, medications, help from Citizens Advice or some other organisation, gp and specialist letters, evidence, witness statements etc the form is ready to be back with them.

    When it comes to these forms I panic at the thought of filling them in.

    I have copies of my last completed form and I use that as a guide, but I have to prepare myself to be able to sit down and sort it out.

    Under DLA I could take my time. Do one section every 2 or 3 days, then read it back, re write it, read it back. Ask someone else to read it to see if they think Ive missed anything, update it. Get an appointment with an expert and get tbem to go over it. Go and see my GP and get a letter from them. Etc etc.

    When I did the PIP claim in 2015 it made me ill.

    I'd wake up in a panic. I'd be heaving when I got up in a morning. I lost weight. I couldnt concentrate. Every week there would be something in the news about plans to cut the eligibility. It was awful.

    What made it worse was there was a delay between sending in my forms and getting the assessment of about 2 months. I went in December 2015. Then tbere was a delay with the decision. I had to wait until the middle of March 2016, but rather than give the award from that date they backdated the start date to 19 January.

    My award runs until 19 January next year so I'll have to go through it again very soon

    I know under DLA the renewal period started 20 weeks prior to the end date. I also understand that PIP is reviewed around a year before the claim end date, so a 3 year award is actually only a 2 year award. So even here we are being penalised. Its a disgrace and just another way of kicking people when they are down.

    I didnt ask for this to happen to me. I dont enjoy being in pain. I dont enjoy being depressed. I dont enjoy being stresed out all the time. I certainly dont enjoy averaging around 3.5 hours sleep per night. I 6

    What I worry about most in terms of losing my award is not the money. I spend most of it on treatments that the NHS wont or cant supply and covering some of the difference in my wages from my part time hours to the full time equivalent so I'll just have to give up the extra treatments and go back to work full time so I'll only be about £40 a month down. But.... Without the treatments and the added stress of working full time I'll likely have more sickness absence than I do currently, which in turn causes more problems with stress and anxiety as I get into trouble for having time off which with my conditions is unavoidable.

    Working full time will have its own issues. Fatigue, stress, etc etc.

    I currently have an alternative working pattern which means I dont have to work late (past 6.00pm) and I can start later (between 9.30 and 10am). This allows me time to get up. Take my meds, prepare for the day. Use heat methods if necessary to ease any stiffness in my knee. Do my exercises. Get up a little later if necessary as I don't sleep very well. Have something to eat with is important because of my meds, allow my meds to get into my system and my body to stabilise before driving to work.


    Also, it's not the money that I'm bothered about.

    With a mobility award comes a Blue Badge without needing a further assessment. Without that badge I will lose my on site parking bay meaning I have to park around a mile away from work. This again causes further pain before I even begin a days work. This leads to increased doses of Morphine and codeine which I use on top of Fentanyl patches for breakthrough pain (currently my average daily opiate intake is around 450mg) . This leads to having to deal with Morphines side effects.

    If I dont drive, or if I can't be in the car as a responsible licenced individual so my wife can drive on her provisional licence I'd have to get public transport. This causes problems as the tram is always packed and I rarely get a seat meaning I have to stand for the entire journey. Same with the bus but thats worse as it takes longer. Then I have to walk just over a mile to work causing the same problems with pain, especially when its cold.

    I get the car park space as part of a number of reasonable adjustments my employer has put in place, but it is reliant on my having the badge.

    I'll have to appeal their decision to take it away and make a case for retaining it. Again this is yet more stress and anxiety I can do well without.

    This is what MP's like Esther McVey dont see and dont realise.

    The award of PIP is worth far more than a monetary value to a lot of people. It's the additional doors that an award opens that help in far more ways than tHe cash ever will. For most of these doors require you to be registered disabled, which in other words means you have a live/current claim for PIP/DLA/AA.

    Their 'Austerity' measures, leading to the diabolical treatment of sick and disabled people, have such a huge impact.

    I want to work. I need to work to keep my mind occupied and not be thinking of other things and other people, but without the award my physical health would be much better off if I gave up my current job, which I love doing.

    As Ive mentioned earlier I'm still struggling to come to terms with my daughters death and this is having a severe impact on my mental health. But this is unlikely to be taken into account based on information from the internet as apparently this is a temporary issue that will get better within 6 months of her death. Meaning I should be well over it now.

    I'm sick of being treated like dirt by our Government.
    To equate judgement and wisdom with occupation is at best . . . insulting.
    • poppy12345
    • By poppy12345 13th Jan 18, 10:46 PM
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    poppy12345
    I completed my Pip forms this week. I had help from a professional organisation and wish I hadn't bothered. I am blind and have a guide dog yet she kicked no to mobility issues because I haven't got a mental impairment. It was only at the point of signing the form when I asked about the planning and following a journey section that she realised she's made a mistake. I fully expect to be turned down and will need to appeal and I'm really not surprised because I wouldn't give me an award based on those forms
    Originally posted by nannytone
    I also had help from a professional organisation to help complete my daughters PIP form. I had all my evidence ready and thought i'd add a letter once the forms were filled in. Yes i realised i probably could have filled them in myself but those forms are scary, so decided to go ahead with the help.

    The person came to my house to help. Was asked questions about my daughter, to which i answered in great detail. He filled the form in, asking more questions along the way. What was written on the form was very little and hardly any detail. I was sat there thinking, not to worry i'll do to it when he's gone. I was asked to sign the form, which i did as i'm her appointee. He then said ill take the form with me to photo copy, then i'll send it to DWP. I went into complete panic mode because i knew there wasn't enough info written.

    I had huge amounts of evidence to prove those descriptors applied to her. It was just those forms that let me down. I worried thinking that she'd be refused. She was given a home assessment with a GP letter. around 6 weeks later the decision arrived. Enhanced for both.

    We hear lots of stories that filling in those forms correctly are the most important thing. For my daughter that wasn't true. The evidence i gave far outweighed the poor filling in of that form.

    Hopefully the same will happen to you and your award will go in your favour. Good luck.
    • w06
    • By w06 13th Jan 18, 11:01 PM
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    w06
    agreed the form is just part of the assessment process, I sometimes feel the emphasis on it being completed perfectly in some posts on here and elsewhere will put people off trying to apply.

    I'd intentionally avoided reading fora prior to my PIP claim and had only glanced at the criteria not focused on the descriptors at all. I completed my form in an evening and sent it off - I hadn't opened the envelope until the last possible day i could send it as was dreading it.

    At my face to face the assessor agreed it was barely legible (as is my hand writing) but she could pick out key words, and for many of the tick boxes I'd not been sure which applied and so eitehr ticked none or the most likely and explained (illegibly). In the more info box I added 'it would probably be easier to explain in person'.

    I didn't send any evidence either - but agreed to them using my DLA claim file on the PIP1

    Ended up with enhanced for both parts
    • Ames
    • By Ames 13th Jan 18, 11:26 PM
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    Ames
    I also had help from a professional organisation to help complete my daughters PIP form. I had all my evidence ready and thought i'd add a letter once the forms were filled in. Yes i realised i probably could have filled them in myself but those forms are scary, so decided to go ahead with the help.

    The person came to my house to help. Was asked questions about my daughter, to which i answered in great detail. He filled the form in, asking more questions along the way. What was written on the form was very little and hardly any detail. I was sat there thinking, not to worry i'll do to it when he's gone. I was asked to sign the form, which i did as i'm her appointee. He then said ill take the form with me to photo copy, then i'll send it to DWP. I went into complete panic mode because i knew there wasn't enough info written.

    I had huge amounts of evidence to prove those descriptors applied to her. It was just those forms that let me down. I worried thinking that she'd be refused. She was given a home assessment with a GP letter. around 6 weeks later the decision arrived. Enhanced for both.

    We hear lots of stories that filling in those forms correctly are the most important thing. For my daughter that wasn't true. The evidence i gave far outweighed the poor filling in of that form.

    Hopefully the same will happen to you and your award will go in your favour. Good luck.
    Originally posted by poppy12345
    Cutbacks to services mean that there's a lot of bad 'specialist advisers' out there. I was talking to one a couple of months ago and was shocked by how little she knew. Absolutely basic benefit rules, she didn't have a clue about. A couple of hours browsing the relevant MSE fora would make someone more qualified.

    Years ago welfare advisers were highly trained, experienced, and employed. Now it's being done by volunteers who've been given a copy of the benefits handbook.
    Unless I say otherwise 'you' means the general you not you specifically.
    • nannytone
    • By nannytone 14th Jan 18, 4:28 PM
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    nannytone
    I know that I know an awful lot more about benefits and the person that fill my forms in did/. I even had to remind her to put my evidence in the envelope he was quite happy to post it off without any B]. She rushed through the questions and didn't seem at all interested in asking additional questions to get the detail. I just want a face to face assessment now so that I can correct all the Miss information that was on the phone. When I asked you about this accessory she said always about a 45% with Pip and 70% at appeal. I really don't want to go to appeal because I know that I am entitled. You get told to let a professional fill your form in for you and it isn't always the best idea I could have done better with the help of my daughter
    • Ames
    • By Ames 14th Jan 18, 5:19 PM
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    Ames
    I know that I know an awful lot more about benefits and the person that fill my forms in did/. I even had to remind her to put my evidence in the envelope he was quite happy to post it off without any B]. She rushed through the questions and didn't seem at all interested in asking additional questions to get the detail. I just want a face to face assessment now so that I can correct all the Miss information that was on the phone. When I asked you about this accessory she said always about a 45% with Pip and 70% at appeal. I really don't want to go to appeal because I know that I am entitled. You get told to let a professional fill your form in for you and it isn't always the best idea I could have done better with the help of my daughter
    Originally posted by nannytone
    I think no 'help' is better than bad help. The adviser I mentioned says it's their policy not to bother filling the forms out comprehensively because you'll be able to give full details to the tribunal. I thought she'd got confused and meant face to face rather than tribunal, but if I'm reading your post correctly your advice service has 45% success rate at application and 70% at tribunal, so maybe just expecting to go to tribunal and not bothering to get it right first time is widespread.
    Unless I say otherwise 'you' means the general you not you specifically.
    • poppy12345
    • By poppy12345 15th Jan 18, 7:56 AM
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    poppy12345
    I think no 'help' is better than bad help. The adviser I mentioned says it's their policy not to bother filling the forms out comprehensively because you'll be able to give full details to the tribunal. I thought she'd got confused and meant face to face rather than tribunal, but if I'm reading your post correctly your advice service has 45% success rate at application and 70% at tribunal, so maybe just expecting to go to tribunal and not bothering to get it right first time is widespread.
    Originally posted by Ames
    Yikes! that's so bad! The whole point is to try not go to Tribunl obviously. I know that these advice centres are voluntary but seriously some of them have no idea.

    I think those of us that do have knowledge are just so scared of those forms. I know Nanny has the knowledge, myself included but filling out those forms scares the hell out of me. It felt even worse about doing it on behalf of my daughter.

    I really hope you have an understanding assessor nannytone. It sure is a worry but the form has been returned and there's nothing you can do about that now, unfortunately. Hopefully the wait for the assessment isn't too long. Good luck!
    • nannytone
    • By nannytone 15th Jan 18, 4:06 PM
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    nannytone
    I used to work for d i a l so routinely filled in DLA forms day after day. I would never do my own forms though because you can't be objective. This was my first time with a pip form and although my pie would have completed it for me I didn't think it was fair to make her feel responsible for any award I may or may not receive
    • NeilCr
    • By NeilCr 15th Jan 18, 7:18 PM
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    NeilCr
    From the other side of the fence!

    I’ve spent quite a bit of time over the years helping people complete DLA and PIP forms. As a volunteer not a benefits adviser. As mentioned above we lost our paid benefits adviser (who is my partner) a number of years ago through government cuts.

    We do try to get volunteers specialising in DLA/PIP forms but quite often, they’d rather do more varied “work”. And, where possible, you would want it to be someone quite experienced - and the calls on our time are huge and we aren’t exactly brimming over with the volunteers.

    A few general comments

    1) the level of knowledge, experience and confidence amongst applicants is varied and that’s something you have to suss out very quickly

    2) a lot of applicants present with little medical evidence and it can be like getting blood from a stone to obtain clear information of how the condition effects them. I find it often helps to have the partner /spouse along (if there is one). They see things that the applicant doesn’t and, often, have a more realistic view of how the condition impacts.

    3) I could scream at the number of people who turn up a few days before the form is due in and expect to be seen there and then. That’s one of my big tips. Contact the organisation as soon as you get the form

    4) The majority of “fails” that I’ve seen (apart from those who clearly don’t qualify) are ones where there is not enough detail on the form.

    5) From what I see on this forum there are folks more than able of completing their own forms. Including quite a few in this thread

    6) Nannytone makes a very good point about being too close to your own form. Just by asking a few questions I’ve been able to help people see another side to it all. Indeed, I’ve had a few cases where applicants just wanted to talk it through. They were quite happy to complete their own form but were checking that they had covered all the bases.

    7). You do have to give it your best shot with the MR - but, see above, re shortness of time. Again, in my experience clients give you less time for the MR than the appeal.

    8. I wish you the best of luck Nannytone. Not sure you need it, though!
    Last edited by NeilCr; 15-01-2018 at 7:34 PM.
    • deannatrois
    • By deannatrois 21st Jan 18, 5:02 AM
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    deannatrois
    Very true muttley,I have 50 years experience of hiding it and didn't even realise that I was doing it until I had a major meltdown
    Originally posted by sandra1980123
    Same here, diagnosed with ASD at 53.., I have had lots of minor meltdowns (at which point I'd walk out of the situation) in stressful situations. But even with both my sons having ASD and being very involved with social workers/CAHMs for years anyone I asked if I had it too just said 'everyone is on the spectrum to some degree'. My meltdowns were not seen as due to ASD somehow because I didn't openly show any other symptoms and I suppressed them as much as possible. It was seen as me being a 'bad mum' rather than as a mental health problem. I just carried on hiding my problems as much as possible. I had to show I was a coping mum so I suppressed my 'weakness' as much as humanely possible. Even when filling in the questionaires for a diagnosis, I was still showing the 'coping' side lol. It was such a large part of me, hiding my symptoms it was very difficult to be truthful, even with myself.

    Mind you that was blown apart when I managed to go into a major meltdown at the Royal Maudsley after some difficult tests lol.
    Last edited by deannatrois; Yesterday at 5:04 AM.
    • sandra1980123
    • By sandra1980123 22nd Jan 18, 2:31 AM
    • 24 Posts
    • 9 Thanks
    sandra1980123
    Lol but sometimes that needs to happen for them to see it.
    I have had mini meltdowns too and obviously I knew things weren't right but because you don't know any different you just get on with it and hide it the best you can,it was after I got put on esa it was a Sunday and I just felt my anxiety starting for no reason and I realised I was getting myself ready to sign on on the Tuesday and I didn't realise that I had been doing that and then I was Iike yee haa no more job centre on a Tuesday lol.
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