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    • bluedrop
    • By bluedrop 30th Nov 17, 12:02 PM
    • 638Posts
    • 202Thanks
    bluedrop
    Edwardian house - What to expect?
    • #1
    • 30th Nov 17, 12:02 PM
    Edwardian house - What to expect? 30th Nov 17 at 12:02 PM
    Hi all,
    A 4 bed detached Edwardian property came on the market today. I love the room sizes! Looks like it has been reasonably updated and it has double glazing throughout. The vendors are downsizing to move into a granny flat. So everything is perfect.

    We live in a 1930s semi. What to expect from Edwardian homes in comparison? Are they expensive to maintain / heat ? Can we do to keep the gas bills reasonable?

    Would you buy an Edwardian house? Or should I just forget this and look at the new builds Barratts are building on the other side of the town?
    There is more to life than increasing its speed.
Page 1
    • aneary
    • By aneary 30th Nov 17, 12:04 PM
    • 817 Posts
    • 704 Thanks
    aneary
    • #2
    • 30th Nov 17, 12:04 PM
    • #2
    • 30th Nov 17, 12:04 PM
    Barratts house vs Edwardian house no contest in my opinion.

    You buy the barratts home and you lose money the minute you walk through the door.
    • martinsurrey
    • By martinsurrey 30th Nov 17, 12:08 PM
    • 3,225 Posts
    • 3,927 Thanks
    martinsurrey
    • #3
    • 30th Nov 17, 12:08 PM
    • #3
    • 30th Nov 17, 12:08 PM
    Hi all,
    A 4 bed detached Edwardian property came on the market today. I love the room sizes! Looks like it has been reasonably updated and it has double glazing throughout. The vendors are downsizing to move into a granny flat. So everything is perfect.

    We live in a 1930s semi. What to expect from Edwardian homes in comparison? Are they expensive to maintain / heat ? Can we do to keep the gas bills reasonable?

    Would you buy an Edwardian house? Or should I just forget this and look at the new builds Barratts are building on the other side of the town?
    Originally posted by bluedrop
    I moved from a 3 bed semi Victorian place (90sq m), which I fully renovated, inc loft insulation and good windows) to a 220sq m detached 5 bed 1980's build, and my utility bills FELL.

    I loved the look and feel of the Victorian place, but my current house is 100% better in every other way.
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 30th Nov 17, 12:08 PM
    • 6,286 Posts
    • 6,066 Thanks
    davidmcn
    • #4
    • 30th Nov 17, 12:08 PM
    • #4
    • 30th Nov 17, 12:08 PM
    We live in a 1930s semi. What to expect from Edwardian homes in comparison?
    Originally posted by bluedrop
    Something about 20-30 years older. It won't be dramatically different.
    • Rambosmum
    • By Rambosmum 30th Nov 17, 12:13 PM
    • 1,552 Posts
    • 2,013 Thanks
    Rambosmum
    • #5
    • 30th Nov 17, 12:13 PM
    • #5
    • 30th Nov 17, 12:13 PM
    high ceiling = higher bills and harder to hear in my experience. I wouldn't change it though!
    • bluedrop
    • By bluedrop 30th Nov 17, 12:22 PM
    • 638 Posts
    • 202 Thanks
    bluedrop
    • #6
    • 30th Nov 17, 12:22 PM
    • #6
    • 30th Nov 17, 12:22 PM
    high ceiling = higher bills and harder to hear in my experience. I wouldn't change it though!
    Originally posted by Rambosmum
    The ceilings aren't THAT high. Not like Victorian houses. But definitely higher than my 1930s house.
    There is more to life than increasing its speed.
    • Rambosmum
    • By Rambosmum 30th Nov 17, 1:21 PM
    • 1,552 Posts
    • 2,013 Thanks
    Rambosmum
    • #7
    • 30th Nov 17, 1:21 PM
    • #7
    • 30th Nov 17, 1:21 PM
    The ceilings aren't THAT high. Not like Victorian houses. But definitely higher than my 1930s house.
    Originally posted by bluedrop


    We have a late Victorian house, ceilings are 3m. We've moved from a 30s semi. And the difference is quite dramatic in terms of harder to heat but it is really lovely, and room sizes are brilliant.
    • hazyjo
    • By hazyjo 1st Dec 17, 9:56 AM
    • 9,843 Posts
    • 12,487 Thanks
    hazyjo
    • #8
    • 1st Dec 17, 9:56 AM
    • #8
    • 1st Dec 17, 9:56 AM
    I've just moved (last week) from a 1930s house to an Edwardian house.


    I've lived in many types of house over the years. This Edwardian house is COLD downstairs. But then we do have a thru-lounge at the mo (and there are very high ceilings). There is also a log burner which we need to find out how to work which will help. The rooms will be split next year so I'm hoping it warms up a bit after that.


    Do I care? No. I love my house and would trade warmth for character. If my OH and friends/family heard me say that they'd collapse lol. I am someone who likes to be in a warm house with my arms bare (and usually my shoulders, I like strapless tops at home!) and at the mo I am walking round with a top/fleece hoody on, socks and slippers and putting a 'granny blanket' (ie long cardigan) over my legs.


    Upstairs is warm at least


    Can't really think of any other downsides with mine. It's much more soundproof than my old house. When my OH is upstairs, it feels like he's a million miles away now. In the old one, I could hear him snoring if I was downstairs. Our old house was in a VERY quiet crescent - this one is busier. I heard more noise in the old one! We're very surprised at that. When I shut the door behind me when I get home, we're in our own little world.
    2017 wins: Opera tickets; film preview; lipstick; Ideal Home Show tickets + afternoon tea & bottle of Champagne; 2 cases of NKD; notebook; bath rack; books; film Premiere; Broadchurch DVDs; lipbalms; hamper (food/wine/Echo Dot/Jo Malone goodies); Avon lippies; cowhide rug; Windsor luxury break, foundation; Flybe flight
    • theartfullodger
    • By theartfullodger 1st Dec 17, 10:20 AM
    • 9,117 Posts
    • 12,084 Thanks
    theartfullodger
    • #9
    • 1st Dec 17, 10:20 AM
    • #9
    • 1st Dec 17, 10:20 AM
    A genuine Edwardian House would have deplorable plumbing, no central heating, terrible insulation, no double glazing, but probably a few servants.

    Ah, the good old days!
    • martindow
    • By martindow 1st Dec 17, 10:27 AM
    • 7,301 Posts
    • 4,079 Thanks
    martindow
    but probably a few servants.

    Ah, the good old days!
    Originally posted by theartfullodger
    They might be getting on a bit though ...
    • ReadingTim
    • By ReadingTim 1st Dec 17, 11:07 AM
    • 2,227 Posts
    • 3,152 Thanks
    ReadingTim
    There are just too many variables in the OP's dilemma to comment, and then there's personal preference as to ambient temperature. But as a rule:
    • A detached house will be more expensive to heat than a semi
    • A larger house will be more expensive to heat than a smaller house
    • An older house will be more expensive to hear than a newbuild

    Personal preference comes into it too - some people want to be able to wander around in a t-shirt and bare feet whilst others subscribe to the 'put another jumper on' way of warming up. Men perhaps feel the cold less than women too. We don't know what the OP's preferences are in this regard.

    However, one way to keep bills down in larger houses is not to try and heat (too much) unused rooms and 'dead' space such as halls, landings, spare bedrooms etc. Keep a reasonable ambient temperature throughout the place, but warm up rooms you use often - the kitchen / eating area, the living room for watching TV etc. A cool bedroom actually helps you sleep better, but you might need a warmer duvet instead!
    • elverson
    • By elverson 1st Dec 17, 1:16 PM
    • 719 Posts
    • 456 Thanks
    elverson
    Have a look at the wiring and the plumbing if possible.
    • Lord Baltimore
    • By Lord Baltimore 1st Dec 17, 3:50 PM
    • 1,307 Posts
    • 1,297 Thanks
    Lord Baltimore
    Edwardian properties will have some or all of the following: high ceilings; coving; old wiring; lead plumbing; timber rot; creaky floors; dodgy rooves; black mortar; poor insulation; aging brickwork; various DIY botchings; condensation, mould and cold.

    They are owned by frozen-looking senior citizens who want to move out before hypothermia gets them or people indulging in some sort of time-warp period drama mentality who are prepared to suffer for that olde worlde pre-first world war experience.

    Houses that are 120 years old cost an arm and a leg to maintain and heat. Their charm wears thin rapidly as your income and savings follow suit. You can divest yourself of this torture by owning a modern home and having money to actually enjoy your life
    all your base are belong to us
    • hazyjo
    • By hazyjo 1st Dec 17, 4:02 PM
    • 9,843 Posts
    • 12,487 Thanks
    hazyjo
    Each to their own Lord B - I've lived in modern (8 years old) and old (Edwardian/Victorian). Give me an old house any day. Lucky for me, I've got money to enjoy my life too Win-win!


    Thankfully we all have our own opinions and like different things - stops the world becoming a VERY boring and predictable place (and there'd be an awful lot of empty old houses lol)


    OP - up to you at the end of the day. No right or wrong. Some like old, some like new. C'est la vie.
    2017 wins: Opera tickets; film preview; lipstick; Ideal Home Show tickets + afternoon tea & bottle of Champagne; 2 cases of NKD; notebook; bath rack; books; film Premiere; Broadchurch DVDs; lipbalms; hamper (food/wine/Echo Dot/Jo Malone goodies); Avon lippies; cowhide rug; Windsor luxury break, foundation; Flybe flight
    • Grenage
    • By Grenage 1st Dec 17, 6:22 PM
    • 1,324 Posts
    • 1,254 Thanks
    Grenage
    It's entirely dependent on the house and it's condition.

    Our Georgian house is a North-facing semi, with some original windows. It costs a bit more to heat than our old well-insulated 1970s terrace, but it's a price I'm happy to pay. The ceiling height is a big deal to me and the missus.

    We only ever have the thermostat to 17, so it might be a different case if turned it up to the tropics.

    Modern homes are great for insulation ratings, but that's all I can say. Horses for courses.
    • Flutterbat17
    • By Flutterbat17 1st Dec 17, 8:29 PM
    • 69 Posts
    • 75 Thanks
    Flutterbat17
    Ooh this is an interesting thread

    We are moving to a old Georgian house and we know for sure it will be cold, damp and drafty in its current condition.

    We’ve lived in new builds, we thought we would love our ‘new’ house but in fact we realised we don’t like new builds at all. I find them too hot, boxy and boring amongst other things.

    I’m so very excited to move into our cold drafty but full of history and character house. We accept we probably will never have the same amount of disposable income we have now though. Lol. Potential Money pit!
    • trailingspouse
    • By trailingspouse 1st Dec 17, 8:39 PM
    • 2,462 Posts
    • 3,526 Thanks
    trailingspouse
    Edwardian properties will have some or all of the following: high ceilings; coving; old wiring; lead plumbing; timber rot; creaky floors; dodgy rooves; black mortar; poor insulation; aging brickwork; various DIY botchings; condensation, mould and cold. Oh yes, absolutely, couldn't agree more. But you forgot to mention the period features. And you can get DIY botchings, condensation and mould in a modern house.

    They are owned by frozen-looking senior citizens who want to move out before hypothermia gets them or people indulging in some sort of time-warp period drama mentality who are prepared to suffer for that olde worlde pre-first world war experience. Or people that just love living somewhere that isn't like every other house on the estate.

    Houses that are 120 years old cost an arm and a leg to maintain and heat. Their charm wears thin rapidly as your income and savings follow suit. You can divest yourself of this torture by owning a modern home and having money to actually enjoy your life That's fine, you go buy a modern home and leave the Edwardian ones to those of us who appreciate them.
    Originally posted by Lord Baltimore
    I've lived in an Edwardian house for 4 years - and yes, there was a lot of work to do when we first moved in but now - wow. We have a full height basement, a 'proper' attic with a real staircase, 4 bedrooms, two bathrooms, and oodles of period features.

    For the price we could afford, we could either buy a tiny modern house that needed no work doing to it - or this one. No contest.
    • Quizzical Squirrel
    • By Quizzical Squirrel 1st Dec 17, 10:30 PM
    • 171 Posts
    • 4,192 Thanks
    Quizzical Squirrel
    I love old houses but in my house search I learned that you can replicate old house character in a brand new home.
    Not one of these modern estate boxes of course but you can absolutely do it from scratch or even retro-fit other houses. Takes money of course.

    I've visited houses that I would swear were 300 years old but it turns out they were built in the last 20 years. It's remarkable what can be done.
    • Lord Baltimore
    • By Lord Baltimore 2nd Dec 17, 1:32 AM
    • 1,307 Posts
    • 1,297 Thanks
    Lord Baltimore
    Or people that just love living somewhere that isn't like every other house on the estate.
    Originally posted by trailingspouse
    You never ever see row after row of terraced Edwardian/Victorian properties eh? Fair play to Homes under the Hammer; it's convinced people that civilised living conditions comprise running water and a draught up your trouser leg both of which were enjoyed by prehistoric man in his cave residence.

    In a modern house you have reserved parking, an accessible garage, warmth at much less cost, permanent hot water in the tap and no seemingly ever-present hand-wringing workmen who see you as their banking facility.

    But to be fair, as Hazyjo says, each to his/her own
    all your base are belong to us
    • benjus
    • By benjus 2nd Dec 17, 11:07 AM
    • 5,021 Posts
    • 3,088 Thanks
    benjus
    At that age you're probably looking at about 1 ghost per 15 square metres on average.
    Let's settle this like gentlemen: armed with heavy sticks
    On a rotating plate, with spikes like Flash Gordon
    And you're Peter Duncan; I gave you fair warning
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