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    • AcStar
    • By AcStar 29th Nov 17, 8:53 PM
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    AcStar
    Serious defects missed in Colleys Homebuyers report
    • #1
    • 29th Nov 17, 8:53 PM
    Serious defects missed in Colleys Homebuyers report 29th Nov 17 at 8:53 PM
    I had a survey done by Colley's in 2010 and they negligently did not 'follow the trail' of significant defects caused by dry rot. Had they advised me to get a specialist in, these faults would have been spotted and I would never have purchased the property. To rectify this 95% of the property was demolished and costs of bridge loan, issues with professionals and a high valuation have resulted in complete loss of l capital invested. An independent expert has valued the overpayment for the house such that I literally only paid for the land. A court case is about to start after prolonged issues to reach this stage.
    Has anyone else experienced negligence in terms of the survey from Colleys. Where they have missed a defect. I am not referring to a Colley's valuation. It would be really helpful to know if I am a voice in the dark in this nightmare.

    Many thanks
    Last edited by AcStar; 29-11-2017 at 8:58 PM. Reason: to clarify points
Page 2
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 30th Nov 17, 10:23 PM
    • 14,224 Posts
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    moneyistooshorttomention
    Just put in a test request on an online site and received quotes for my low value (less than £200,000) house of:

    £385 for Homebuyers Survey
    £474 for the higher level survey

    to give an example of costs. Hmm...higher level survey is less than I thought they were. Though I had always read that highest level survey is what one gets if it's an obvious physical wreck at the quickest glance and/or hundreds of years old touch (not what seems, on the face of it, to be a fairly standard house of modern era).
    New Year's Resolution already made -

    Don't get mad....get firm ...
    • Thrugelmir
    • By Thrugelmir 30th Nov 17, 10:29 PM
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    Thrugelmir
    Which represents a pretty decent hourly rate (which many of us would love to be paid) from where I'm standing.
    Originally posted by moneyistooshorttomention
    Professional indemnity insurance would take a sizeable cut of fee income. Then there's an office to run. A £500 a year membership fee to pay........
    “Opportunities come infrequently. When it rains gold, put out the bucket, not the thimble”
    ― Warren Buffett
    • Thrugelmir
    • By Thrugelmir 30th Nov 17, 10:40 PM
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    Thrugelmir
    Point taken and why I am going to make it a mission to get this changed as we are in the hands of individuals who should be made responsible for cover ups, mistakes and so on. In my case the course of events from my situation have had a severe life-changing impact on myself and my family.
    I am sure I am not alone with this?
    Originally posted by AcStar
    The world is full of fraudsters unfortunately. Firing your arrows wildly might not bring you recompense either. Simply more financial pain.
    “Opportunities come infrequently. When it rains gold, put out the bucket, not the thimble”
    ― Warren Buffett
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 1st Dec 17, 7:16 AM
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    moneyistooshorttomention
    Professional indemnity insurance would take a sizeable cut of fee income. Then there's an office to run. A £500 a year membership fee to pay........
    Originally posted by Thrugelmir
    Insurance - accepted (no idea how much that is). Office to run? - chances are that they work from home anyway. Membership fee - accepted - but electricians (for instance) also have to pay a "membership fee" (membership of the NIC/EIC) and their hourly rate is high - but not as high as that would appear to be.

    Wonders whether half of the idea of making such a charge is to say "We are professionals - careers and not jobs for us" after a comment on a news site the other day. The comment being that a builder was saying how they always turn up in suits (ie "Aren't I a professional?" in non-verbal language). When actually "rougher" clothes would be a sight more appropriate to inspecting a house. I thought that builder made a good point. I can, much more readily, picture someone in jeans walking through a muddy garden or kneeling down opening a manhole cover or something than someone in suits. Does sound like "I'm wearing a suit" should be interpreted as "Don't even ask me to do anything other than just take a quick look".

    It's a common ploy to dress "too smart" for any more "menial" tasks one doesn't wish to do.

    I think we'd all accept that level of charge - if we were "getting what we pay for" for it.
    Last edited by moneyistooshorttomention; 01-12-2017 at 7:20 AM.
    New Year's Resolution already made -

    Don't get mad....get firm ...
    • csgohan4
    • By csgohan4 1st Dec 17, 7:25 AM
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    csgohan4
    the onus will be on you proving negligence, any photos in 2010 ? evidence from back then?? otherwise it's your word against theirs
    "It is prudent when shopping for something important, not to limit yourself to Pound land"
    • teneighty
    • By teneighty 1st Dec 17, 9:07 AM
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    teneighty
    Back to the OP's question. This must be a very interesting and unusual case for 95% of the property to require demolition due to dry rot.

    There is nowhere near enough information to comment whether the surveyor was negligent. Dry rot can be very difficult to identify sometimes with very little visible evidence on the surface but with a well established fungal growth hidden in the walls, floors etc. out of sight.

    Given the firm involved was Colleys (owned by Lloyds Bank I believe), one of the large national chains I was moaning about, chances are the surveyor had 2 maybe even 3 Homebuyers to do that day as well as possibly 2 or 3 mortgage valuations and the same the next day and the day after that etc. etc. Is it any wonder that these cheap surveys are just generic tick box exercises with the resultant errors and omissions?

    The good news is it is very easy to take the surveyor to task and claim compensation when they get it wrong. If more people went through the simple and free official complaints procedure I would hope that these firms would raise their standards, although in time that would probably lead to an increase in the cost of a survey.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 1st Dec 17, 10:07 AM
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    Davesnave
    Back to the OP's question. This must be a very interesting and unusual case for 95% of the property to require demolition due to dry rot.....
    Originally posted by teneighty
    Must admit, I stopped reading at that point.

    When a claim like that isn't fleshed-out, one tends to be sceptical.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • teneighty
    • By teneighty 1st Dec 17, 12:32 PM
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    teneighty
    Who knocks down 95% of a property? I wonder what the 5% left standing was?
    • Thrugelmir
    • By Thrugelmir 1st Dec 17, 12:38 PM
    • 56,214 Posts
    • 49,598 Thanks
    Thrugelmir
    Insurance - accepted (no idea how much that is). Office to run? - chances are that they work from home anyway. Membership fee - accepted - but electricians (for instance) also have to pay a "membership fee" (membership of the NIC/EIC) and their hourly rate is high - but not as high as that would appear to be.
    Originally posted by moneyistooshorttomention
    Ever run an office?
    “Opportunities come infrequently. When it rains gold, put out the bucket, not the thimble”
    ― Warren Buffett
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 1st Dec 17, 12:43 PM
    • 14,224 Posts
    • 38,534 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    Back to the OP's question. This must be a very interesting and unusual case for 95% of the property to require demolition due to dry rot.

    There is nowhere near enough information to comment whether the surveyor was negligent. Dry rot can be very difficult to identify sometimes with very little visible evidence on the surface but with a well established fungal growth hidden in the walls, floors etc. out of sight.

    Given the firm involved was Colleys (owned by Lloyds Bank I believe), one of the large national chains I was moaning about, chances are the surveyor had 2 maybe even 3 Homebuyers to do that day as well as possibly 2 or 3 mortgage valuations and the same the next day and the day after that etc. etc. Is it any wonder that these cheap surveys are just generic tick box exercises with the resultant errors and omissions?

    The good news is it is very easy to take the surveyor to task and claim compensation when they get it wrong. If more people went through the simple and free official complaints procedure I would hope that these firms would raise their standards, although in time that would probably lead to an increase in the cost of a survey.
    Originally posted by teneighty
    Dry rot in a house may be something that's just happened to that particular house for no obvious reason anyone can think of - or it may be more of a "community" thing and a surveyor should be aware there was the possibility of it being there.

    Friends of mine bought themselves a house in an area that everyone knows had a bad flood well within living memory. They subsequently found dry rot and managed to catch it early on and deal with it themselves and have lived in the house for decades since to present day.

    Now, in their case, I would have thought any surveyor going would know how badly that area once flooded and be on the lookout specifically for that in that particular area (from his/her "local knowledge" they should have).

    Wondering which of those two categories OP's house comes in (ie a one-off or a community problem that "local knowledge" thing a surveyor should know about).
    New Year's Resolution already made -

    Don't get mad....get firm ...
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 1st Dec 17, 12:44 PM
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    Davesnave
    I've renovated my property to the extent that all the rooms have been affected in some way by the removal & replacement of walls, ceilings, window openings, supporting structures and floors, but although it's been pretty comprehensive, I wouldn't say more than 25% has been demolished/added-on.

    Frankly, if it had needed even 50% demolition, I'd have said it was easier to go the whole hog and start again.

    This is why I found 95% demolition hard to understand. As you say, what was the 5%?
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 1st Dec 17, 12:49 PM
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    moneyistooshorttomention
    I'd hazard a guess at 5% being something like a brick-built garden shed??
    New Year's Resolution already made -

    Don't get mad....get firm ...
    • AcStar
    • By AcStar 1st Dec 17, 3:38 PM
    • 12 Posts
    • 7 Thanks
    AcStar
    Thanks all for this. Yep when they charged me over £1200 for my survey did not even think it was anything less than the full works - always had full works. But as I said before this was not relevant in repsect of my issues. Interestingly exclusions for certain things such as rot are excluded on top and mid survey.

    I am just really annoyed that we have to rely on these people as our only route to a 'safe' purchase.
    And yes - wish I had an hourly rate like that! Its more than my Park Lane Divorce lawyer was charging me in times long gone by!
    • AcStar
    • By AcStar 1st Dec 17, 3:39 PM
    • 12 Posts
    • 7 Thanks
    AcStar
    planning issues - which sadly also meant full VAT had to be paid as well.

    I was at the wrong end of every issue - even changes in stamp duty came in and the sales market crashed.
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 1st Dec 17, 4:10 PM
    • 14,224 Posts
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    moneyistooshorttomention
    Well - keep us posted....
    New Year's Resolution already made -

    Don't get mad....get firm ...
    • teneighty
    • By teneighty 1st Dec 17, 5:32 PM
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    teneighty
    Thanks all for this. Yep when they charged me over £1200 for my survey did not even think it was anything less than the full works - always had full works. But as I said before this was not relevant in repsect of my issues. Interestingly exclusions for certain things such as rot are excluded on top and mid survey.

    I am just really annoyed that we have to rely on these people as our only route to a 'safe' purchase.
    And yes - wish I had an hourly rate like that! Its more than my Park Lane Divorce lawyer was charging me in times long gone by!
    Originally posted by AcStar
    An exclusion clause for "rot" doesn't sound right.

    Reading between the lines in your original post where you talk about "following the trail" I'm guessing the dry rot was completely hidden but there was an associated defect which should have flagged up the risk that dry rot might be an issue. As I said before we don't have enough information to comment but it is certainly a legitimate argument although dry rot can be a particularly tricky beast to find and can hide away completely undetectable until you start hacking off plaster and ripping up floor boards.
    • AcStar
    • By AcStar 2nd Dec 17, 10:10 AM
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    • 7 Thanks
    AcStar
    All this makes me think I was not wrong in being under the impression it was a full survey for £1200
    Interesting my rogue architect was actually only an associate! So many levels to my issues and I should never have been put in this position in the first place.
    • AcStar
    • By AcStar 2nd Dec 17, 10:11 AM
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    • 7 Thanks
    AcStar
    After 6 yrs I think we may be going to the mediation table.
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