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    • UKParliament
      Verified User verified user
    • By UKParliament Verified User verified user 28th Nov 17, 1:08 PM
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    UKParliament
    MPs to debate women affected by state pension age increases
    • #1
    • 28th Nov 17, 1:08 PM
    MPs to debate women affected by state pension age increases 28th Nov 17 at 1:08 PM
    On Wednesday 29 November, MPs will debate the subject of women affected by state pension age increases.

    The motion to be debated is:

    That this House calls on the Government to improve transitional arrangements for women born on or after 6 April 1951 who have been adversely affected by the acceleration of the increase to the state pension age.

    You can watch the debate live or catch-up later on Parliament TV.
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    MSE has given permission for me to post letting you know about relevant and useful info. You can see my name on the organisations with permission to post list. If you believe I've broken the Forum Rules please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com. This does NOT imply any form of approval of my organisation by MSE
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    • jem16
    • By jem16 6th Dec 17, 3:55 PM
    • 18,591 Posts
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    jem16
    No. It was the 2007 Act I remembered that the 2010 act did not change my pension age but forgot when it was initially changed.
    Originally posted by Terron
    Not quite.

    The 2007 Act would have increased your spa to a maximum of 65 yrs 9mths. Then the 2011 Act increased it to 66 as it speeded things up a bit.

    The 2007 Act seems to have been forgotten about, especially by Labour even though it was their Act, and did affect men and women born 6th April 59 onwards.
    • molerat
    • By molerat 6th Dec 17, 5:14 PM
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    molerat
    https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2007/22/schedule/3
    www.helpforheroes.org.uk/donations.html
    • Terron
    • By Terron 6th Dec 17, 5:38 PM
    • 145 Posts
    • 168 Thanks
    Terron
    Looks like whereever it was I checked my previous pension age before 2010 was wrong. Still it is 66 now, and allowing a woman born on the same date to retire at 60 would be unjust,
    • jem16
    • By jem16 7th Dec 17, 9:03 AM
    • 18,591 Posts
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    jem16
    Looks like whereever it was I checked my previous pension age before 2010 was wrong. Still it is 66 now, and allowing a woman born on the same date to retire at 60 would be unjust,
    Originally posted by Terron
    Very unjust and hopefully should never see the light of day. If it does by any miracle happen, then I hope all you men will complain. Perhaps you should all be complaining now to the likes of Carolyn Harris, Chair of the WASPI APPG.
    • Mortgagefreeman
    • By Mortgagefreeman 13th Dec 17, 8:44 AM
    • 418 Posts
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    Mortgagefreeman
    Iím sure youíll all be delighted to hear, thereís yet another WASPI debate in the HOC tomorrow!
    • colsten
    • By colsten 13th Dec 17, 2:14 PM
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    colsten
    Hooray. More MP time wasted . This debate will go the same way as all the previous ones have gone - lots of blustering by Labour and SNP, sloping shoulders by Govt, the end.
    • Paul_Herring
    • By Paul_Herring 14th Dec 17, 6:42 PM
    • 6,205 Posts
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    Paul_Herring
    https://hansard.parliament.uk/commons/2017-12-14/debates/94129EFF-1C16-4FA7-90A9-1B78B93E327A/PensionEqualityForWomen

    That this House calls on the Government to publish proposals to provide a non-means tested bridging solution for all women born on or after 6 April 1950 who are affected by changes to the State Pension age in the 1995 and 2011 Pension Acts.
    Can't wait.
    Conjugating the verb 'to be":
    -o I am humble -o You are attention seeking -o She is Nadine Dorries
    • redux
    • By redux 14th Dec 17, 7:36 PM
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    redux
    Non means tests bridging solution against changes from 1995?

    As above, some of the later changes are effectively shorter notice, and can do with some attention, but announcing in 1995 something that will gradually taper in from 2010 to 2020 is surely early enough.

    If Waspi succeeds in letting my 2 year younger sister retire 4 years before me, I'd say good luck to her, but that would be an increase not decrease in age difference, and the against inequality concept in the name of the organisation a charade. Perhaps they might rename it.

    I can see other organisations setting the discussion up by explaining what it is about - women born in the 1950s face an unexpected wait of the best part of a decade before they can get their State Pension.

    How is it that even the changes announced in 1995 can be described now as unexpected, and for which they have not had time to prepare?
    • ffacoffipawb
    • By ffacoffipawb 14th Dec 17, 7:39 PM
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    ffacoffipawb
    That has naff all to do with equality!
    • redux
    • By redux 14th Dec 17, 8:20 PM
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    • 23,202 Thanks
    redux
    That has naff all to do with equality!
    Originally posted by ffacoffipawb
    Several of the comments are not about pensions.
    • colsten
    • By colsten 14th Dec 17, 8:32 PM
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    • 7,639 Thanks
    colsten

    How is it that even the changes announced in 1995 can be described now as unexpected, and for which they have not had time to prepare?
    Originally posted by redux
    Minor correction: the changes were actually announced in November 1993, in the Autumn Statement, delivered by Ken Clarke, the then Chancellor.

    After careful consideration, the Government have decided that the state pension age should eventually be equalised at the age of 65. The change will be phased in over ten years, starting in the year 2010, so it will not affect anyone currently aged 44 or older. By the year 2020, the state pension age in Britain will be broadly in line with that of most of our industrial competitors, although we will still have more generous arrangements than in the United States, where the pension age is to be equalised at the age of 67. All developed countries are making similar changes for similar reasons. Women nowadays tend to spend more of their lives in paid employment. They also live longer than men. Pension schemes need to recognise this, and end the current discrimination between the sexes.

    In the next century, the ratio of working people to retired people will fall sharply, and the burdens on taxpayers will rise. The Government's decision will moderate those burdens, eventually by some £5 billion a year, and so help to ensure that they are sustainable. The basic pension is, and will remain, a cornerstone of the welfare state. The Government are committed to it and to retaining its value.

    Full budget speech: http://johnmajor.co.uk/page4283.html
    by Kenneth Clarke
    This obviously pre-dates the 2011 Pensions Act, which accelerated the equalisation to end of 2018 rather than 2020. It still gave us a minimum of 17 years notice of equalisation. It's beyond me how anyone can describe this as unexpected, or as sudden.
    • Silvertabby
    • By Silvertabby 14th Dec 17, 9:23 PM
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    Silvertabby
    I've said it before and I'll say it again - the re-equalisation of State pension ages should have been part of the 1975 Sex equality legislation. That way, women's State pension age could have increased by 1 year every decade from, say, 1980 or 1985, and we wouldn't have all this faff.

    I can only assume that it wasn't done because Harold Wilson was in power - and he only wanted the vote attracting 'good' bits of equality instead of the 'bad' bits.

    Spoken as a 1950s woman (who was fully aware of the 1995 changes when they were plastered all over the media over 20 years ago).
    Last edited by Silvertabby; 14-12-2017 at 9:26 PM.
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