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  • FIRST POST
    • LilBec
    • By LilBec 26th Nov 17, 1:47 PM
    • 18Posts
    • 0Thanks
    LilBec
    Mould, condensation and solutions?
    • #1
    • 26th Nov 17, 1:47 PM
    Mould, condensation and solutions? 26th Nov 17 at 1:47 PM
    Hi all
    Hoping to get some advice. I have an apartment that I went out. The tenants have been in touch to tell me they as having problems with mould. I obviously don't want them (and their baby) to have to put up with this, and equally i don't want the apartment damaged by the problem. So I need to address it but I don't know how.

    Reading about mould seems to suggest excess damp can be a problem- the mould is in the bedroom, around the doors (theres a juliette balcony) and little window. But this bedroom is next to the bathroom which due to design flaw has no window - I've wondered whether a better more effective extractor fan could help?

    I've also read that cold can feed it, and tenants have said bedroom gets quite cold and problem is worse during cold spells. But apartment has electric heating and only one "radiator" in the room so not sure how to warm it more unless we look at a fan heater or something similar. Coukd that be effective?

    Finally, dehumidifier? Are they helpful? I have read not so much when it's cold?

    Oh and one more thing, systems like Mr venty? Are they really worth it? Anyone know what they cost, roughly? And what happens if no loft?

    Any advice would be really appreciated? Thanks
Page 1
    • Debbie Savard
    • By Debbie Savard 26th Nov 17, 2:22 PM
    • 100 Posts
    • 58 Thanks
    Debbie Savard
    • #2
    • 26th Nov 17, 2:22 PM
    • #2
    • 26th Nov 17, 2:22 PM
    You'd be better looking at the source. With a baby, do they have a washer and tumble drier in frequent use - does it vent externally?

    Also do they keep the flat sealed-up to avoid cold drafts and paying for high fuel bills?

    I find a dehumidifier helps a lot.
    • savemoney
    • By savemoney 26th Nov 17, 2:32 PM
    • 12,841 Posts
    • 11,441 Thanks
    savemoney
    • #3
    • 26th Nov 17, 2:32 PM
    • #3
    • 26th Nov 17, 2:32 PM
    A dehumidifier definitely should help its part of the solution but also its a must to have to cut down on the cause which is high humidity usually attributed to our modern lives. Venting and insulation does help a lot.

    The humidity in mots of my house is around 50% - 60% occasionally bumping up. A dehumidifier might take a while to make a difference but once humidity level is okay around 609% shouldn't go on much and there not that expensive to run.

    If they shower make sure a decent fan is provided in the bathroom, or have windows open once they have washed.

    Cooking with lids on pans and making sure if they have to dry clothes a dehumidifier on you can get them now with washing drying option.

    I have two a eco air DC202 and a Mitsubishi

    The Mitsubishi is by far the best one easily has a humidity setting, drying and quite as is the eco air but doesn't have a humidity option only timed but is quite too
    Last edited by savemoney; 26-11-2017 at 3:18 PM.
    • Zither
    • By Zither 26th Nov 17, 2:43 PM
    • 291 Posts
    • 38 Thanks
    Zither
    • #4
    • 26th Nov 17, 2:43 PM
    • #4
    • 26th Nov 17, 2:43 PM
    Not much of a suggestion but why not get them some of those silicate dehumidifier packs from Poundland whilst you investigate further? Gives you and tenant a bit of thinking time whilst you work out a long term solution? Would only cost £5-10.
    • LilBec
    • By LilBec 26th Nov 17, 3:07 PM
    • 18 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    LilBec
    • #5
    • 26th Nov 17, 3:07 PM
    • #5
    • 26th Nov 17, 3:07 PM
    Thanks Zither, good idea will try that in ths short term.
    Debbie it's a condenser drier, it does vent outside but I know they are notoriously ineffective at drying so they may dry stuff in the house which probably contributes. They are telling me they leave vents open to try and circulate air but they are also having problems keeping the room warm so spending a lot on heating which I feel bad about.
    Savemoney, what type of dehumidifier do you Have? There seem to be two types and one recommended for colder temps, but I'm not sure house would count as "cold" even tho the room is chilly? Also what size do you recommend?

    Thanks everyone for comments so far!
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 26th Nov 17, 3:47 PM
    • 758 Posts
    • 269 Thanks
    sevenhills
    • #6
    • 26th Nov 17, 3:47 PM
    • #6
    • 26th Nov 17, 3:47 PM
    Reading about mould seems to suggest excess damp can be a problem- the mould is in the bedroom, around the doors (theres a juliette balcony) and little window. But this bedroom is next to the bathroom which due to design flaw has no window - I've wondered whether a better more effective extractor fan could help?
    Originally posted by LilBec
    You need to make sure that there is no water ingress via the walls and window, pointing???

    • savemoney
    • By savemoney 26th Nov 17, 4:09 PM
    • 12,841 Posts
    • 11,441 Thanks
    savemoney
    • #7
    • 26th Nov 17, 4:09 PM
    • #7
    • 26th Nov 17, 4:09 PM
    Thats a affilate link they contain nagayout-21 You keep posting the same affilate link in multiple posts.

    None affilate link

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Futura-Portable-Dehumidifier-Moisture-settings/dp/B0753F74R8/ref=sr_1_1?s=kitchen&ie=UTF8&qid=1511712550&sr=1-1&keywords=Futura+2000ml

    Us a dehumidifier like
    - high capacity, low noise, low energy, humidity sensor makes sure it turns off after reaching a set level.

    All the best.
    Originally posted by magn8p
    Last edited by savemoney; 26-11-2017 at 4:32 PM.
    • deannatrois
    • By deannatrois 26th Nov 17, 4:10 PM
    • 4,912 Posts
    • 6,879 Thanks
    deannatrois
    • #8
    • 26th Nov 17, 4:10 PM
    • #8
    • 26th Nov 17, 4:10 PM
    If the bedrooms are cold try using insulating wallpaper on the exterior walls. Condensation is worse on cold walls. I used this in a place I was told over and over that it was my lifestyle that was the problem in spite of keeping windows open, not drying clothes inside the place. Using insulating wallpaper after cleaning off the mould kept the mould away and meant the bedroom was warmer (was using two duvets, blankets and still cold). My central heating rarely raised the temperature in the property so was part of the problem. It was eventually replaced which made a huge improvement as well.

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Erfurt-Graphite-Insulating-Lining-Paper-10m-x-50cm-Wall-Insulation-DIY/231340578435?epid=0&hash=item35dcf91683:g:vqkAAOSw Dk5UIBQo

    It only took a couple of rolls to do the outside walls. Apparently its like adding another layer of concrete blocks. As soon as it was up, the walls were warm rather than cold. Which logically, meant any moisture in the air was less likely to condensate on the walls.

    You do need to get pvc like glue as well.

    All I can say is the mould never returned, in spite of my 'lifestyle'.
    Last edited by deannatrois; 26-11-2017 at 8:05 PM.
    • lotteryman
    • By lotteryman 1st Dec 17, 12:39 PM
    • 9 Posts
    • 6 Thanks
    lotteryman
    • #9
    • 1st Dec 17, 12:39 PM
    • #9
    • 1st Dec 17, 12:39 PM
    Hi,

    The condensation and mould is often caused by a lack of ventilation and, of course, the house not being adequately heated: this is often the case if the tenants are trying to save on heating bills.
    You don't say if the property is a flat or a house. My daughter's flat had serious condensation issues and she tried the dehumidifier route but quite frankly it was a waste of money
    I then did a lot of research and read a lot of good things about Positive Input Ventilation(PIV) units so decided to try one. . I installed one of these this year and she hasn't had any condensation since. Essentially it is a unit that fits into the ceiling in the hallway with a unit that is sited in the loft. It takes filtered air from the loft (if the property has one; if not there is a model available that doesn't require a loft) and circulates it around the house. It also has the benefit of improving the quality of the air. It is whisper quiet and easy to fit (some electrical work). They are made by Nuaire and cost around £250 - £300 (see Nuaire.co.uk and i-sells.co.uk). They can be inexpensive to run; the model without an in built heater costs about the same as running a light bulb, the one with the heater is more expensive) As I say it has completely resolved the issue throughout my daughter's flat. I advise you go to the Nuaire site and read the information and from what I gather lots of landlords use it as a solution.
    Hope this helps

    Last edited by lotteryman; 01-12-2017 at 12:45 PM.
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