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    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 25th Nov 17, 8:28 PM
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    MrsLurcherwalker
    What was day to day food in your childhood?
    • #1
    • 25th Nov 17, 8:28 PM
    What was day to day food in your childhood? 25th Nov 17 at 8:28 PM
    Hi, I'm aware of price rises across the board whenever I shop and also those welcome YS bargains are very thin on the ground these days too. I'm trying to remember the meals we had as 'everyday' meals way back when to see if I can give us tasty meals from simpler ingredients and also cut back on some of the outlay on the weekly shop. I'm sure main meals weren't as exotic as is the norm now. I've made a start on the list for me but I'm aware there will be regional differences and wonder what was nicest to eat for supper from childhood memories in other areas in the hope of new ideas that use simple ingredients that won't break the budget every week.

    We had stews with dumplings, sausage and mash, hot pot, pie, mash and peas etc. care to share childhood favourites?

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    Last edited by MSE Andrea; 06-12-2017 at 9:31 AM.
    Thumpers mum was right - if you can't find anything nice to say don't say anything at all!
Page 8
    • cuddlymarm
    • By cuddlymarm 6th Dec 17, 9:05 PM
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    cuddlymarm
    Hi guys
    I was born in the early sixties and depending on the size of the lamb joint or chicken, this meant Sunday roast and then meals most of the week. Mum didn’t drive so we’d start with fresh veg and spuds at the beginning of the week to tinned towards the end. So it would be something like meat and chips on Monday, rissoles on Tuesday, soup made from the bones on Wednesday or even Thursday some weeks. Then fishfingers or egg and chips Friday. Liver and onions occasionally showed up, also meat or meat and potato pie or cottage pie. We always had tinned fruit, tinned rice pud and evaporated milk in because dad worked next door to the Libby’s factory.
    Toast made on the fire was a treat and by the time I was late juniors at school I knew how to manage a pressure cooker. We didn’t have a freezer and the shops closed at 12 on Saturday and didn’t reopen till Monday so you made do with what there was. It fascinates me how people panic about the shops being closed for Xmas day. If Xmas fell wrong then the shops could be closed for 4 days and we were fine.
    I also loved school dinners ( apart from Fridays if it was yellow fish day) I went to a small village school where we all ate the same, mainly a diet of cottage pie, pie and veg, sausage and mash, stew and dumplings etc and gorgeous pudding, really bright pink blamonge (not sure whether I spelt that right) semolina pud, Manchester tart, various sponges with custard and milky coffee and biscuits. I think we got the milky puds when there was a glut of milk that needed using.
    We rarely had fish and chips from the chippy because it was too far away and I don’t remember any waste. Veg peels went on the compost heap only if it wasn’t able to be made into soup.
    I don’t remember strawberries or salad in winter. Meals depended on what we had and it was an unspoken rule that you cleared your plate.
    There just wasn’t the choice in the village shop that we expect today and what you didn’t have you didn’t miss.
    • 5RadisH2
    • By 5RadisH2 6th Dec 17, 10:06 PM
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    5RadisH2
    My breakfast was either dripping or golden syrup sandwiches. I went home from school at dinnertime to a hot meal of mashed potatoes, leg beef and cabbage or cauliflower. 50's food was poor quality and food rationing was still in force after WW2 until, I think, 1953.
    School meals were even worse. Potatoes , cheese pie and dark green cabbage followed by spotted !!!! pudding and lumpy custard. It was supposed to be a balanced meal but tasted awful. The best part of school meals was that, one day a week, we had semolina pudding with jam - you could stir the jam in to make a pink pudding.
    Tea was dripping, jam or treacle sandwiches, whichever I didn't have for breakfast.
    Last edited by 5RadisH2; 06-12-2017 at 10:09 PM. Reason: !!!! censorship
    • Blackbeard of Perranporth
    • By Blackbeard of Perranporth 6th Dec 17, 10:44 PM
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    Blackbeard of Perranporth
    I can!!!8217;t remember my childhood, I was starving and had rickets!
    Every fairy story always ends the same way
    Hope, then tragedy at the end of the world!
    • Pollycat
    • By Pollycat 6th Dec 17, 11:43 PM
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    Pollycat
    My breakfast was either dripping or golden syrup sandwiches. I went home from school at dinnertime to a hot meal of mashed potatoes, leg beef and cabbage or cauliflower. 50's food was poor quality and food rationing was still in force after WW2 until, I think, 1953.
    School meals were even worse. Potatoes , cheese pie and dark green cabbage followed by spotted !!!! pudding and lumpy custard. It was supposed to be a balanced meal but tasted awful. The best part of school meals was that, one day a week, we had semolina pudding with jam - you could stir the jam in to make a pink pudding.
    Tea was dripping, jam or treacle sandwiches, whichever I didn't have for breakfast.
    Originally posted by 5RadisH2
    I loved potatoes (mashed) and cheese pie at school but we used to have it with tinned plum tomatoes.

    Were school meals in those days really supposed to be 'balanced'?
    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 7th Dec 17, 9:23 AM
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    MrsLurcherwalker
    A memory just popped in .....did anyone else's mum start stews off with an Oxtail Soup cube (I think it was FOSTER LEN's OXTAIL SOUP CUBES) to make up for the small amount of stewing shin of beef that went into them? I've tried to recreate the flavour with modern soup mixes but it's nothing like as savoury as I remember it!
    Thumpers mum was right - if you can't find anything nice to say don't say anything at all!
    • Eenymeeny
    • By Eenymeeny 7th Dec 17, 10:30 AM
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    Eenymeeny
    A memory just popped in .....did anyone else's mum start stews off with an Oxtail Soup cube (I think it was FOSTER LEN's OXTAIL SOUP CUBES) to make up for the small amount of stewing shin of beef that went into them? I've tried to recreate the flavour with modern soup mixes but it's nothing like as savoury as I remember it!
    Originally posted by MrsLurcherwalker
    I remember my mum adding a packet of Knorr vegetable soup mix to give her own soups 'a bit of body' The only stock cubes I remember in our house were Oxo beef cubes which we often had as a hot drink, accompanied with a slice of dry bread to dip in, for supper.
    I recently purchased Heinz Oxtail powdered soup from a market stall. Maybe it's intended for export? I haven't seen it in supermarkets. It was lovely added to a beef stew...
    The beautiful thing about learning is nobody can take it away from you.
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    • Judi
    • By Judi 7th Dec 17, 10:36 AM
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    Judi
    tin meat with sauce...

    Luncheon meat and tomato sauce sandwiches. On a Saturday we would have that tinned plastic ham.
    'Holy crap on a cracker!'
    • caronc
    • By caronc 7th Dec 17, 10:38 AM
    • 3,148 Posts
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    caronc
    A memory just popped in .....did anyone else's mum start stews off with an Oxtail Soup cube (I think it was FOSTER LEN's OXTAIL SOUP CUBES) to make up for the small amount of stewing shin of beef that went into them? I've tried to recreate the flavour with modern soup mixes but it's nothing like as savoury as I remember it!
    Originally posted by MrsLurcherwalker
    I think my mum must have used something like that but I can't remember what they were called, she did somewtimes use a couple of tsps of the powdered soup you used to get in small boxes (about the size of a matchbox. I find an oxtail cupasoup does the trick
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    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 7th Dec 17, 11:56 AM
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    MrsLurcherwalker
    That's the one CARONC, small box of powdered soup and it was gorgeous as the gravy sauce to the stew!
    Thumpers mum was right - if you can't find anything nice to say don't say anything at all!
    • Bigjenny
    • By Bigjenny 7th Dec 17, 1:15 PM
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    Bigjenny
    Think they were called Foster Clark's Soup Cubes.
    "When one door closes another door opens; but we so often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door, that we do not see the ones which open for us" Alexander Graham Bell
    • thriftylass
    • By thriftylass 7th Dec 17, 1:31 PM
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    thriftylass
    We would get our warm meal at school and my parents at the local factory's canteen. Dinner would often be bread, pickled fish, cheese and cold cuts as we had one warm meal already. Saturday would be roast chicken night (half a broiler each, nothing else and Sunday anything from my mum's well stocked freezer of batch cooked meals (various stews, stuffed cabbage, HM beef olives, goulash). Lunch on weekend would often be any kind of soup.

    (70/80 eastern Germany)
    Last edited by thriftylass; 07-12-2017 at 1:35 PM.
    • eastcott5
    • By eastcott5 7th Dec 17, 3:50 PM
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    eastcott5
    this thread takes me back.
    I am a post ww2 bulge child - so still rationing. My dad dug up the garden of our council house and we had lots of veg soups. Cauliflower cheese was a favourite - still is, and macaroni cheese.
    My grandparents lived down the road and gave us brown sugar and butter sandwiches for tea after school when my mum worked. Fortunately we moved by the time I was 7 - or I wouldn't have any teeth left. We lived by the sea and once a week my mum would go to the fish monger for the 'boat' rejects - lots of home made fish pies. Tried our own winkles once - not good.
    Pressure cooker on almost permanently to tenderise scrag end of mutton etc. Bottled runner beans - always a strange grey colour. Also lots of stock from bones for soups.
    My father was in Egypt and returned with a taste for rice and curries - that took some getting used to - especially the rice which was probably pudding rice.
    Bread and butter pudding with dried fruit was a favourite.
    • Primrose
    • By Primrose 7th Dec 17, 4:38 PM
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    Primrose
    I am a post ww2 bulge child - so still rationing......
    Pressure cooker on almost permanently to tenderise scrag end of mutton etc. Bottled runner beans - always a strange grey colour. Also lots of stock from bones for soups.
    .
    Originally posted by eastcott5
    Gosh those bottled runner beans strike a memory chord. My parents had some huge ceramic Ali Baba type pots and grew lots of runner beans in the back garden. They were sliced and salted down in the pots - a layer of sliced beans then a layer of salt until the pots were full and the beans rested in a briny salt liquid from the.moisture emitted from the beans. bY this time they had turned into a grey mush and had to be soaked in several bowls of fresh water before eating to remove the salt. Ye gods I can still remember the unappetising mush on the plate all these years later but we weren’t allow to waste them “because the brave sailors in boats bringing food to England were being bombed and sunk”.
    • LameWolf
    • By LameWolf 7th Dec 17, 4:59 PM
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    LameWolf
    Gosh those bottled runner beans strike a memory chord. My parents had some huge ceramic Ali Baba type pots and grew lots of runner beans in the back garden. They were sliced and salted down in the pots - a layer of sliced beans then a layer of salt until the pots were full and the beans rested in a briny salt liquid from the.moisture emitted from the beans. bY this time they had turned into a grey mush and had to be soaked in several bowls of fresh water before eating to remove the salt. Ye gods I can still remember the unappetising mush on the plate all these years later but we weren!!!8217;t allow to waste them !!!8220;because the brave sailors in boats bringing food to England were being bombed and sunk!!!8221;.
    Originally posted by Primrose
    Ooh yes; my maternal grandmother had dozens of jars of salted beans in her larder; grandad used to grow rows and rows of the blighters at the bottom of the garden, and they'd be laboriously cut into slices - on a slant as I remember - and salted down precisely as Primrose describes.
    LameWolf
    If your dog thinks you're the best, don't seek a second opinion.
    • THIRZAH
    • By THIRZAH 7th Dec 17, 5:02 PM
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    THIRZAH
    I remember salted runner beans. They always seemed to be so salty even if they were washed several times.

    Does anyone remember Honeycomb mould-it came in a packet which you made up with milk. It used to set into three layers-I loved it. We didn't eat much packet or tinned food but my mother would buy that occasionally. She would also buy some lemonade crystals.I'm not sure what they were called. There was a picture of the Eiffel Tower on the box. They made a bright yellow lemonade.

    The reason we didn't have much packet or tinned food was nothing to do with healthy eating. My Grandfather was in the trenches for most of WW1. He claimed to have lived on such food and refused to touch it when he came home so my Father wouldn't eat it either.Although these days he lives on ready meals-my stepmother is a terrible cook!
    • Hollyberry
    • By Hollyberry 7th Dec 17, 10:38 PM
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    Hollyberry
    Nan lived with us, and was chief cook as she used to run the police canteen, and could make lots from little. She also kept a big vegetable patch (including those runner beans) and a lot of soft fruit, all of which sat in jewelled kilner jars in the pantry. So in the 1960s our main meals included roasts (chicken or beef, and occasionally lamb), pie (normally stewing steak), shepherd's pie, liver casserole with tomatoes and crispy bacon on the top, stuffed marrow (with a bolognaise style stuffing), jacket potatoes with cheese, and bacon and tomatoes (literally those two things, with bread to bulk out the meal).

    When my mum cooked, she would make things like a sausage plait, with sausagemeat, onions and tomatoes with a puff pastry crust or else a Vesta curry, which is still a taste of my childhood. That got served with mash as well as rice to bulk it out for us all. She was also mistress of the hotpot, which had sliced crispy potatoes on top.

    My favourite meal of nan's was known as souper douper. It was basically a soup with stewing steak, carrots, onions, swede, potatoes, pearl barley, dumplings and a can of Heinz tomato soup to bulk it out. It was absolutely gorgeous and could be relied upon to stick your ribs thoroughly. I still make a version of it, using nan's old casserole dish.
    • nmlc
    • By nmlc 8th Dec 17, 7:09 AM
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    nmlc
    Morning everyone

    We used to grow green beans too, and remember about the cutting them on the slant. My mum had a green bean slicer, that we used to clamp to the dining room table and feed the beans in and wind the handle and it cut the beans into slices - I think she does still have this but they don't have a veg garden anymore. I also remember the Corona pop man - it was big glass bottles of pop, lemonade etc used to be delivered and he would take the empty glass bottles back and you'd get some money back. Recycling at it's best even all those years ago.

    Keep safe and well x

    nmlc x
    WEIGHTLOSS SINCE JUNE 2009 - 5 ST 2LB
    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 8th Dec 17, 8:10 AM
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    MrsLurcherwalker
    We had the 'CORONA MAN' too who called in his van on Sunday afternoons
    to deliver and collect the empties. We also had milk delivered in glass bottles every day and on Sunday mornings he'd call for his money and a huge treat was that he had 1/4 pint bottles of the nicest orange juice I can remember having and on the odd occasion my brother and I were allowed to have one. I think he only had them on the float on Sundays and sometimes they were all gone before he reached our house. I remember too the baker coming in his van which you could climb up into and choose a cake, we had a mobile greengrocer too and sometimes a mobile grocery shop would park in the road but I don't remember them much after the mid 1960s when supermarkets came to the UK, shopping habits must have changed rapidly after that.

    We also had a mobile fish and chip van which parked in the road a couple of days a week and he sold fresh fish too.
    Thumpers mum was right - if you can't find anything nice to say don't say anything at all!
    • cuddlymarm
    • By cuddlymarm 8th Dec 17, 2:33 PM
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    cuddlymarm
    Hi guys
    I!!!8217;m loving this thread. It!!!8217;s bringing back so many memories.
    My Uncle had a small dairy farm which supplied milk ( in bottles ) every day. When I was about 8 I think milk had to start being pasteurised and I remember hating it at first because it didn!!!8217;t taste right.
    I hope everyone is keeping warm and well
    Cuddles
    • Hard Up Hester
    • By Hard Up Hester 8th Dec 17, 4:13 PM
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    Hard Up Hester
    We have a mobile chippy, it comes on a Thursday.
    Chin up, Titus out.
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