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  • FIRST POST
    • StevenB12
    • By StevenB12 13th Nov 17, 3:24 PM
    • 37Posts
    • 9Thanks
    StevenB12
    How much do you spend at Christmas?
    • #1
    • 13th Nov 17, 3:24 PM
    How much do you spend at Christmas? 13th Nov 17 at 3:24 PM
    When this time of the year comes up again I always ask friends etc what they are buying family/loved one's/partners etc for christmas or how much they are planning to spend etc, and when they ask me they always look in shock as to how much I spend on people

    Is there a line to be drawn on how much christmas should cost, though?
    Last year I think for..my dad/mam/sister/girlfriend/girlfriends family (mam/2 sisters/ 3 kids to one of her sisters/a sisters boyfriend) and then my grandma etc I probably spent around 1800 or so..

    When ever I ask friends and that it's always a very low figure, and it's not that that is what they can afford it's just what they choose to spend, am I being to generous when it comes to presents?

    This Forum tip was included in MoneySavingExpert.com's weekly email!
    Last edited by MSE Andrea; 22-11-2017 at 8:58 AM.
Page 4
    • Paton147
    • By Paton147 2nd Dec 17, 5:15 PM
    • 23 Posts
    • 9 Thanks
    Paton147
    On my 20 month old daughter weíve spent £100 which was way too much.

    Between my wife and Iís 15 or so immediate family members I reckon thatíll come to around £300.

    My wife and I will shop in the sales for house things we need so im not really counting that....

    However.... Christmas dinner at ours I estimate to be around £150.... and Iím so tempted to suggest to the wife that we charge people!!!
    • Pollycat
    • By Pollycat 2nd Dec 17, 5:36 PM
    • 18,538 Posts
    • 47,726 Thanks
    Pollycat

    However.... Christmas dinner at ours I estimate to be around £150.... and Iím so tempted to suggest to the wife that we charge people!!!
    Originally posted by Paton147
    There was a 'discussion' on This Morning last week (is that an oxymoron?) about that very subject.
    The woman who was charging came across as believable whilst the Australian woman was pretty ineffective in defending her corner.
    • Paton147
    • By Paton147 2nd Dec 17, 9:00 PM
    • 23 Posts
    • 9 Thanks
    Paton147
    Itís an interesting one....

    Weíve always offered to contribute money/food towards the meal each year when our parents have hosted. Theyíve always said no however because they are at a point in their lives when weíve flown the nest and I guess their mortgages / cost of living has eroded away to an extent. They are simply better off than us which stands to reason!

    I think the difference now though is that as the siblings take the lead itís a more level playing field! We have 3 sisters and their husbands coming as well as a few nieces. (13 guests including ourselves).

    We wonít ask for a financial contribution, but in all honestly if Christmas passes and itís never kinda mentioned then iíll take a little offence to that. I think itís pretty naive to simply say ďoh, well you invited us!Ē when there wasnít exactly a fight over who got to host!!

    I really, really enjoy cooking so itís not a big issue but personally I couldnít enjoy a pretty special, expensive meal without at least testing the water on what I could do to assist of help with. We are no better off than the rest of our guests, but the meal will cost us a minimum of £150.
    • Pollycat
    • By Pollycat 3rd Dec 17, 9:12 AM
    • 18,538 Posts
    • 47,726 Thanks
    Pollycat
    Itís an interesting one....

    Weíve always offered to contribute money/food towards the meal each year when our parents have hosted. Theyíve always said no however because they are at a point in their lives when weíve flown the nest and I guess their mortgages / cost of living has eroded away to an extent. They are simply better off than us which stands to reason!

    I think the difference now though is that as the siblings take the lead itís a more level playing field! We have 3 sisters and their husbands coming as well as a few nieces. (13 guests including ourselves).

    We wonít ask for a financial contribution, but in all honestly if Christmas passes and itís never kinda mentioned then iíll take a little offence to that. I think itís pretty naive to simply say ďoh, well you invited us!Ē when there wasnít exactly a fight over who got to host!!

    I really, really enjoy cooking so itís not a big issue but personally I couldnít enjoy a pretty special, expensive meal without at least testing the water on what I could do to assist of help with. We are no better off than the rest of our guests, but the meal will cost us a minimum of £150.
    Originally posted by Paton147
    I'd never turn up to a meal at someone else's house without a bottle or 2 of wine.

    At Christmas, I'd expect to contribute more.
    When we used to go to my parents' house for Christmas dinner, we'd buy the turkey and provide the wine. As my OH said, at least we'll get to drink decent wine.

    And as a guest, I'd offer to clear the table and wash the posts.
    • BBH123
    • By BBH123 7th Dec 17, 10:23 AM
    • 489 Posts
    • 752 Thanks
    BBH123
    For me the thought of charging my nearest and dearest for Christmas lunch is an absolute no no, it doesn't sit well for me at all.


    Having said that none of my guests would dream of turning up empty handed and nor would I if the invite was elsewhere.
    • WorldTraveller
    • By WorldTraveller 7th Dec 17, 10:30 AM
    • 19 Posts
    • 29 Thanks
    WorldTraveller
    Around £300 in total - that's for our three children and a couple of other relatives. Me and my husband don't buy each other gifts at Christmas because it seemed like we were doing it just for the sake of it. We prefer to save up for holidays which we all love and we personally get more out of that than loads of material possessions.
    • fizz
    • By fizz 9th Dec 17, 5:57 PM
    • 868 Posts
    • 1,701 Thanks
    fizz
    [QUOTE=StevenB12;73405979]When this time of the year comes up again I always ask friends etc what they are buying family/loved one's/partners etc for christmas or how much they are planning to spend etc, and when they ask me they always look in shock as to how much I spend on people

    Is there a line to be drawn on how much christmas should cost, though?
    Last year I think for..my dad/mam/sister/girlfriend/girlfriends family (mam/2 sisters/ 3 kids to one of her sisters/a sisters boyfriend) and then my grandma etc I probably spent around 1800 or so..

    When ever I ask friends and that it's always a very low figure, and it's not that that is what they can afford it's just what they choose to spend, am I being to generous when it comes to presents?

    This Forum tip was included in MoneySavingExpert.com's weekly email!
    [/QUO

    Roughly £1000 DD, Mom, Mom's friend, Brother, Niece...that's it. Stopped buying for everyone else about 3 years ago. Also got 2 of these as birthdays this month so £1500 spend probably this month

    fizz.xx
    20p Savers Club 2013 #17 £7.80/£120.00
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