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  • FIRST POST
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 12th Oct 17, 10:12 PM
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    sevenhills
    Crashing in street furniture
    • #1
    • 12th Oct 17, 10:12 PM
    Crashing in street furniture 12th Oct 17 at 10:12 PM
    When there is an accident involving lamp posts, rails and any local authority property, do the police inform the local authorities?
    If a tree or fence needs replacing, do insurance companies foot the bill?

Page 1
    • unholyangel
    • By unholyangel 12th Oct 17, 10:59 PM
    • 11,415 Posts
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    unholyangel
    • #2
    • 12th Oct 17, 10:59 PM
    • #2
    • 12th Oct 17, 10:59 PM
    It my experience it depends on the situation. Typically the police (at least here) will try to trace the owner or if it was perhaps a council house that was damaged, they'd ask the tenants to contact them.

    Your 2nd question...think things through logically for a second. Whats the minimum insurance coverage required to legally drive a car? Third party liability. What does third party liability mean? Well a third party is a entity who is not party to the insurance contract. So third party liability provides cover/insurance against a claim for any damage/injury suffered by someone else for which you are liable.
    Money doesn't solve poverty.....it creates it.
    • bris
    • By bris 12th Oct 17, 11:00 PM
    • 6,937 Posts
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    bris
    • #3
    • 12th Oct 17, 11:00 PM
    • #3
    • 12th Oct 17, 11:00 PM
    Yes it's third party damage, insurance will cover it. The police need to be called and will inform the appropriate council department with your details.
    • Car 54
    • By Car 54 13th Oct 17, 12:06 AM
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    Car 54
    • #4
    • 13th Oct 17, 12:06 AM
    • #4
    • 13th Oct 17, 12:06 AM
    The police don't need to be called. If property is damaged, and you aren't able to give your details to the property owner at the time, then you must report it to the police ASAP, and in any event within 24 hours.
    • angrycrow
    • By angrycrow 13th Oct 17, 6:26 AM
    • 374 Posts
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    angrycrow
    • #5
    • 13th Oct 17, 6:26 AM
    • #5
    • 13th Oct 17, 6:26 AM
    Just wait until you see how expensive it is to replace a lamp post then you will be glad your insurer is picking up the bill. You are talking thousands.
    • Gloomendoom
    • By Gloomendoom 13th Oct 17, 8:23 AM
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    Gloomendoom
    • #6
    • 13th Oct 17, 8:23 AM
    • #6
    • 13th Oct 17, 8:23 AM
    I smashed up a bridge parapet once and wasn't billed. My wife bent a length of roadside railings out of shape and she wasn't billed either. The police attended in both cases.

    There seems to be a degree of luck involved as I know several people who have had to foot the bill for damaged street furniture: lamp posts, a telephone pole, fences and a bus shelter.
    Advice; it rhymes with mice. Advise; it rhymes with wise.
    • Car 54
    • By Car 54 13th Oct 17, 8:29 AM
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    Car 54
    • #7
    • 13th Oct 17, 8:29 AM
    • #7
    • 13th Oct 17, 8:29 AM
    I smashed up a bridge parapet once and wasn't billed. My wife bent a length of roadside railings out of shape and she wasn't billed either. The police attended in both cases
    Originally posted by Gloomendoom
    Can you be sure your insurers weren't billed direct? They wouldn't necessarily tell you
    • Browntoa
    • By Browntoa 13th Oct 17, 8:40 AM
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    Browntoa
    • #8
    • 13th Oct 17, 8:40 AM
    • #8
    • 13th Oct 17, 8:40 AM
    A friend of mine hit a motorised barrier at the blackwall tunnel after slipping on diesel on the road


    he got billed for that but never found out how much , but we hate to think of the expense if insurance hadn't covered it
    I'm the Board Guide of the Referrers ,Telephones, Pensions , Shop Don't drop ,over 50's and Discount Code boards which means I'm a volunteer to help them run smoothly and I can move and merge posts there. However, please remember, board guides don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com Any views are mine and not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.
    • 306chris
    • By 306chris 13th Oct 17, 9:15 AM
    • 228 Posts
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    306chris
    • #9
    • 13th Oct 17, 9:15 AM
    • #9
    • 13th Oct 17, 9:15 AM
    One of my lorries knocked over a stone bench in a town centre a few years ago.

    The police weren't involved but we did receive a hefty bill from the town council.
    Bedroom Tax / Spare room subsidy / Housing Benefit Reduction - It's the same thing, get over it.
    • Gloomendoom
    • By Gloomendoom 13th Oct 17, 9:32 AM
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    Gloomendoom
    Can you be sure your insurers weren't billed direct? They wouldn't necessarily tell you
    Originally posted by Car 54
    In my case yes, absolutely. The car was self insured by the company I worked for. The car was written off but no money was paid to any third party.

    In my wife's case, she asked for cost of the accident when switching insurers and it only covered the cost of the repairs to her car.
    Advice; it rhymes with mice. Advise; it rhymes with wise.
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 13th Oct 17, 1:48 PM
    • 592 Posts
    • 220 Thanks
    sevenhills
    In my wife's case, she asked for cost of the accident when switching insurers and it only covered the cost of the repairs to her car.
    Originally posted by Gloomendoom
    It does seem rather lax, our taxes pays for the repair of street furniture, and not the offender.

    • CardinalWolsey
    • By CardinalWolsey 13th Oct 17, 5:38 PM
    • 95 Posts
    • 83 Thanks
    CardinalWolsey
    The car was self insured by the company I worked for.
    Originally posted by Gloomendoom
    Your company would have had third-party liability only - they can't self-insure their total risk, but it is fairly common for fleets to cover their own damage cost. a) it's illegal (and your car would carry a no-insurance marker against it) and b) your accountant/head of finance/CFO would have heart failure.
    Last edited by CardinalWolsey; 13-10-2017 at 5:40 PM.
    • Gloomendoom
    • By Gloomendoom 13th Oct 17, 6:01 PM
    • 12,911 Posts
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    Gloomendoom
    Your company would have had third-party liability only - they can't self-insure their total risk, but it is fairly common for fleets to cover their own damage cost. a) it's illegal (and your car would carry a no-insurance marker against it) and b) your accountant/head of finance/CFO would have heart failure.
    Originally posted by CardinalWolsey
    You are correct, the total third party risk was not self insured, however, claims below a certain level were. I forget where the threshold was back then. With my current employer it is £12k.
    Advice; it rhymes with mice. Advise; it rhymes with wise.
    • Warwick Hunt
    • By Warwick Hunt 13th Oct 17, 6:04 PM
    • 410 Posts
    • 209 Thanks
    Warwick Hunt
    Your company would have had third-party liability only - they can't self-insure their total risk, but it is fairly common for fleets to cover their own damage cost. a) it's illegal (and your car would carry a no-insurance marker against it) and b) your accountant/head of finance/CFO would have heart failure.
    Originally posted by CardinalWolsey
    No it's not.

    The charge for no insurance reads you either don't have insurance or a surity against third party risk.

    There is no law requiring it to have insurance for your car, the reason most have it is because the cannot afford not to.
    • Gloomendoom
    • By Gloomendoom 13th Oct 17, 6:53 PM
    • 12,911 Posts
    • 17,102 Thanks
    Gloomendoom
    No it's not.

    The charge for no insurance reads you either don't have insurance or a surity against third party risk.

    There is no law requiring it to have insurance for your car, the reason most have it is because the cannot afford not to.
    Originally posted by Warwick Hunt
    I think the surety option is only open to individuals, not corporate bodies.
    Advice; it rhymes with mice. Advise; it rhymes with wise.
    • Warwick Hunt
    • By Warwick Hunt 13th Oct 17, 9:01 PM
    • 410 Posts
    • 209 Thanks
    Warwick Hunt
    I think the surety option is only open to individuals, not corporate bodies.
    Originally posted by Gloomendoom
    Since when?

    If it's a recent change then you maybe right.

    Several police forces and the post office did it.
    • sheramber
    • By sheramber 14th Oct 17, 12:11 PM
    • 3,755 Posts
    • 2,764 Thanks
    sheramber
    the company my husband worked for did not have insurance cover on their company car.

    they considered they paid out less for claims than it would cost to insure all the cars.
    • shaun from Africa
    • By shaun from Africa 14th Oct 17, 12:17 PM
    • 9,502 Posts
    • 10,673 Thanks
    shaun from Africa
    the company my husband worked for did not have insurance cover on their company car.
    Originally posted by sheramber
    But they must still have had 3rd party insurance of have submitted a deposit of £500,000 to the UK courts to cover any potential claims against them.
    • Rover Driver
    • By Rover Driver 14th Oct 17, 1:41 PM
    • 1,300 Posts
    • 593 Thanks
    Rover Driver
    But they must still have had 3rd party insurance of have submitted a deposit of £500,000 to the UK courts to cover any potential claims against them.
    Originally posted by shaun from Africa
    The deposit in the court would be 'such a security in respect of third party risks' and would comply with s.143, Road Traffic Act 1988, and be instead of an insurance policy.

    A company I was involved with had a large fleet of vehicles and had a 'Certificate of deposit' rather than a 'Certificate of insurance'.
    Last edited by Rover Driver; 14-10-2017 at 1:59 PM.
    • Car 54
    • By Car 54 14th Oct 17, 5:46 PM
    • 2,298 Posts
    • 1,475 Thanks
    Car 54
    But they must still have had 3rd party insurance of have submitted a deposit of £500,000 to the UK courts to cover any potential claims against them.
    Originally posted by shaun from Africa
    It may be different in Africa, but in the U.K. the deposit ('security') is INSTEAD of third-party insurance. That's the whole point.
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