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  • FIRST POST
    • couriervanman
    • By couriervanman 12th Oct 17, 7:41 PM
    • 6Posts
    • 3Thanks
    couriervanman
    Goodyear Tyres Germany/Poland
    • #1
    • 12th Oct 17, 7:41 PM
    Goodyear Tyres Germany/Poland 12th Oct 17 at 7:41 PM
    Just had 4 new Goodyear tyres fitted at a very good price......but 2 are made in Germany and 2 in Poland also both the 2 German tyres have jun 17 manufacture date but the Polish tyres were made nov 16 and mar 17
    So the question would that bother you or am worrying about nothing and what is acceptable for tyre manufacture date ie one tyre is almost 1 yr old
Page 1
    • vikingaero
    • By vikingaero 12th Oct 17, 7:49 PM
    • 10,315 Posts
    • 13,017 Thanks
    vikingaero
    • #2
    • 12th Oct 17, 7:49 PM
    • #2
    • 12th Oct 17, 7:49 PM
    The recommendation is that tyres are no more than 5 years old. An average car will wear a set of tyres in a year so no problem.
    The man without a signature.
    • gardner1
    • By gardner1 12th Oct 17, 7:58 PM
    • 2,157 Posts
    • 3,045 Thanks
    gardner1
    • #3
    • 12th Oct 17, 7:58 PM
    • #3
    • 12th Oct 17, 7:58 PM
    so 2 made in poland and 2 in germany is ok as well
    • ilikewatch
    • By ilikewatch 12th Oct 17, 10:12 PM
    • 1,043 Posts
    • 1,235 Thanks
    ilikewatch
    • #4
    • 12th Oct 17, 10:12 PM
    • #4
    • 12th Oct 17, 10:12 PM
    An average car will wear a set of tyres in a year so no problem.
    Originally posted by vikingaero
    Really? I have a fairly heavy right foot, and would be disappointed if I didn't get 20K out of a decent set of tyres. I believe that on average a car in the UK covers about 8K a year.
    • Ectophile
    • By Ectophile 13th Oct 17, 12:13 AM
    • 2,742 Posts
    • 1,683 Thanks
    Ectophile
    • #5
    • 13th Oct 17, 12:13 AM
    • #5
    • 13th Oct 17, 12:13 AM
    The recommendation is that tyres are no more than 5 years old. An average car will wear a set of tyres in a year so no problem.
    Originally posted by vikingaero
    I think you need to get your wheel alignment checked.

    The only time I've ever got through a set of tyres that quick was when the wheels were hopelessly out of alignment.
    If it sticks, force it.
    If it breaks, well it wasn't working right anyway.
    • Tarambor
    • By Tarambor 13th Oct 17, 3:09 AM
    • 1,336 Posts
    • 924 Thanks
    Tarambor
    • #6
    • 13th Oct 17, 3:09 AM
    • #6
    • 13th Oct 17, 3:09 AM
    I think you need to get your wheel alignment checked.

    The only time I've ever got through a set of tyres that quick was when the wheels were hopelessly out of alignment.
    Originally posted by Ectophile
    You can't say that is the issue though. Some people do a lot of mileage, I do 17k a year in my main car so go through a set roughly every year and a half, although I have gone through a set of fronts in a year. I also have a sports car that I cane the absolute hell out of and that eats through tyres too. In both cases there is nothing wrong with the alignment.
    • Gloomendoom
    • By Gloomendoom 13th Oct 17, 9:24 AM
    • 12,911 Posts
    • 17,102 Thanks
    Gloomendoom
    • #7
    • 13th Oct 17, 9:24 AM
    • #7
    • 13th Oct 17, 9:24 AM
    The recommendation is that tyres are no more than 5 years old. An average car will wear a set of tyres in a year so no problem.
    Originally posted by vikingaero
    Really? Are you running super soft track day tyres?

    My wife's SUV tyres lasted nearly 50k miles and 5 years. My car, a near two ton saloon lasted 4 years and 30k + miles.
    Advice; it rhymes with mice. Advise; it rhymes with wise.
    • neilmcl
    • By neilmcl 13th Oct 17, 10:26 AM
    • 10,147 Posts
    • 7,095 Thanks
    neilmcl
    • #8
    • 13th Oct 17, 10:26 AM
    • #8
    • 13th Oct 17, 10:26 AM
    You can't say that is the issue though. Some people do a lot of mileage, I do 17k a year in my main car so go through a set roughly every year and a half, although I have gone through a set of fronts in a year. I also have a sports car that I cane the absolute hell out of and that eats through tyres too. In both cases there is nothing wrong with the alignment.
    Originally posted by Tarambor
    Neither of which is "average", which is what was being discussed. My last set of tyres on my Bmw 1 series lasted well over 35K before I sold the car on and they still had about 3-4mm left.
    • facade
    • By facade 13th Oct 17, 10:41 AM
    • 2,865 Posts
    • 1,457 Thanks
    facade
    • #9
    • 13th Oct 17, 10:41 AM
    • #9
    • 13th Oct 17, 10:41 AM
    so 2 made in poland and 2 in germany is ok as well
    Originally posted by gardner1
    Is there a forum for your car where you can ask?

    My suzuki came with Bridgestone duellers.

    Half the boys in the suzuki club reckoned they were real ditchfinders. The other half said they were fine.
    Turned out thepeople who claimed they were ditchfinders had tyres that said "made in Spain" on the side, and the fine ones said "made in Japan", but were otherwise absolutely identical.


    Wouldn't like to guess with yours, I find that German made Continentals grip the road, but wear out in weeks, and manage to develop cracks all over even before that.
    I want to go back to The Olden Days, when every single thing that I can think of was better.....

    (except air quality and Medical Science )
    • neilmcl
    • By neilmcl 13th Oct 17, 10:43 AM
    • 10,147 Posts
    • 7,095 Thanks
    neilmcl
    Back to the OP's question, the fact that 2 were made in Germany and 2 were made in Poland will not make a jot of difference, they will both be manufactured and tested to the exact same standard.
    • BeenThroughItAll
    • By BeenThroughItAll 13th Oct 17, 10:44 AM
    • 4,521 Posts
    • 3,902 Thanks
    BeenThroughItAll
    I can't believe anyone would bother to worry about something like that.
    • bengalknights
    • By bengalknights 13th Oct 17, 10:47 AM
    • 4,146 Posts
    • 1,513 Thanks
    bengalknights
    Back to the OP's question, the fact that 2 were made in Germany and 2 were made in Poland will not make a jot of difference, they will both be manufactured and tested to the exact same standard.
    Originally posted by neilmcl
    Agree with this, the manufacturing process will be the exact same
    • facade
    • By facade 13th Oct 17, 11:42 AM
    • 2,865 Posts
    • 1,457 Thanks
    facade
    That wasn't out experience with bridgestone, they may have both passed the same tests but the Japanese ones provided more wet weather grip. I have a pair of each, and the Spanish ones go on the front, as I 'd rather crash straight on behind an airbag than slide sideways into a post.
    I want to go back to The Olden Days, when every single thing that I can think of was better.....

    (except air quality and Medical Science )
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 13th Oct 17, 12:39 PM
    • 15,292 Posts
    • 13,632 Thanks
    AdrianC
    There may well be a big difference between European and Far Eastern-specification tyres, and two European factories that could easily be within a mile of each other...
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