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  • FIRST POST
    • Gwendo40
    • By Gwendo40 12th Oct 17, 6:46 PM
    • 19Posts
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    Gwendo40
    How Non-Standard is this Construction?
    • #1
    • 12th Oct 17, 6:46 PM
    How Non-Standard is this Construction? 12th Oct 17 at 6:46 PM
    A bungalow has come up that I'm interested in, it's a one off build and non-standard construction, described as follows...

    Timber framing built off solid masonry walls from foundations to DPC, walls insulated with Rockwool and clad externally with 19mm cedar boarding with a waterproof bituminous membrane, metal lathing and a 19mm render finish. It has a 'normal' pitched, tiled roof.

    So as per the title, with particular regard to mortgageability just how 'non-standard' is this construction?
    Thanks in advance for any replies!
Page 1
    • ProDave
    • By ProDave 12th Oct 17, 8:36 PM
    • 457 Posts
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    ProDave
    • #2
    • 12th Oct 17, 8:36 PM
    • #2
    • 12th Oct 17, 8:36 PM
    Up here that is a standard timber framed house. You can clad the outside with bricks or blocks, or as in this case timber. In some cases a bit of both.

    I suspect outside Scotland, it might be regarded as non standard as you have not been "doing" timber frame for as long as us.
    • ComicGeek
    • By ComicGeek 12th Oct 17, 9:58 PM
    • 251 Posts
    • 197 Thanks
    ComicGeek
    • #3
    • 12th Oct 17, 9:58 PM
    • #3
    • 12th Oct 17, 9:58 PM
    Up here that is a standard timber framed house. You can clad the outside with bricks or blocks, or as in this case timber. In some cases a bit of both.

    I suspect outside Scotland, it might be regarded as non standard as you have not been "doing" timber frame for as long as us.
    Originally posted by ProDave
    Down here it's still a standard timber framed house - but the mortgage companies still see it as non standard construction. It must be possible to get mortgages on timber framed construction though as nearly 50% of all the projects I'm involved with are new build timber framed houses.

    But thanks to lots of successful lobbying and PR by brick manufacturers, timber framed construction is viewed with suspicion by insurers, and this impacts on mortgages.
    • EachPenny
    • By EachPenny 12th Oct 17, 10:31 PM
    • 3,345 Posts
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    EachPenny
    • #4
    • 12th Oct 17, 10:31 PM
    • #4
    • 12th Oct 17, 10:31 PM
    But thanks to lots of successful lobbying and PR by brick manufacturers, timber framed construction is viewed with suspicion by insurers, and this impacts on mortgages.
    Originally posted by ComicGeek
    There were several high-profile fires in the London area involving large timber framed buildings, but fortunately prior to them being occupied and primarily due to their incomplete construction state allowing the fire to spread.

    The argument went that once complete the wooden structure would have been protected and therefore the building would no longer be at such risk. However, there were also concerns that work by future occupiers may compromise the integrity of the fire protection, leaving the building vulnerable again. Post-Grenfell this is likely to be more of a concern.

    With incidents like this you can imagine why insurers - not always known for their expertise on construction techniques - might hear 'timber frame' and think 'fire risk'.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/london/5173808.stm
    http://www.constructionmanagermagazine.com/news/news-round-jan10/

    This link has a series of pictures of one of the fires-
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/in_pictures/5175916.stm
    "In the future, everyone will be rich for 15 minutes"
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 13th Oct 17, 7:19 AM
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    Davesnave
    • #5
    • 13th Oct 17, 7:19 AM
    • #5
    • 13th Oct 17, 7:19 AM
    It must be possible to get mortgages on timber framed construction though as nearly 50% of all the projects I'm involved with are new build timber framed houses.
    Originally posted by ComicGeek
    This construction is different from that of the timber frame properties that have gone up near me in the past few years, as there appears to be nothing in the way of brick, block or stone above DPC.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • Gwendo40
    • By Gwendo40 13th Oct 17, 10:19 AM
    • 19 Posts
    • 10 Thanks
    Gwendo40
    • #6
    • 13th Oct 17, 10:19 AM
    • #6
    • 13th Oct 17, 10:19 AM
    This construction is different from that of the timber frame properties that have gone up near me in the past few years, as there appears to be nothing in the way of brick, block or stone above DPC.
    Originally posted by Davesnave

    Thank you for all the replies.

    This is what worries me, as far as non-standard, timber framed construction goes this one does appear to be at the 'flimsier' end of the scale!
    • m0bov
    • By m0bov 13th Oct 17, 10:28 AM
    • 1,147 Posts
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    m0bov
    • #7
    • 13th Oct 17, 10:28 AM
    • #7
    • 13th Oct 17, 10:28 AM
    Make sure you speak to your broker and mention you need a NSC friendly mortgage provider. We purchased a 60s townhouse, timber frame cross walled construction. Very happy with it, got a mortgage from Santander.
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 13th Oct 17, 12:49 PM
    • 15,759 Posts
    • 14,055 Thanks
    AdrianC
    • #8
    • 13th Oct 17, 12:49 PM
    • #8
    • 13th Oct 17, 12:49 PM
    Non-standard does NOT inherently mean defective. Defective construction properties are unmortgageable - non-standard are not.
    • Gwendo40
    • By Gwendo40 14th Oct 17, 5:34 AM
    • 19 Posts
    • 10 Thanks
    Gwendo40
    • #9
    • 14th Oct 17, 5:34 AM
    • #9
    • 14th Oct 17, 5:34 AM
    Whist the construction technique itself might not be inherently defective would you not agree that it is more vulnerable to suffering serious damage?

    I.e if a traditional brick/block built house develops some kind of damp penetration or water ingress then, once you've fixed the leak and allowed walls to dry out that should be the end of the problem.

    Where as with a house of this type of construction any kind of water ingress could likely cause permanent damage to the very structure of the house with rotten and /or warped timber framing and boarding.

    (This is particularly relevant to this specific house as, although it is immaculately presented, there does appear to be evidence of damp patches on some of the internal walls).
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