Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • MSE Eesha
    • By MSE Eesha 11th Oct 17, 2:22 PM
    • 92Posts
    • 21Thanks
    MSE Eesha
    Warning: Parents with 2+ children whoíll go to uni, SAVE NOW, the systemís biased aga
    • #1
    • 11th Oct 17, 2:22 PM
    Warning: Parents with 2+ children whoíll go to uni, SAVE NOW, the systemís biased aga 11th Oct 17 at 2:22 PM
    This is the discussion to link on the back of Martin's blog. Please read the blog first, as this discussion follows it.





    Please click 'post reply' to discuss below.
Page 1
    • silvercar
    • By silvercar 11th Oct 17, 6:54 PM
    • 36,188 Posts
    • 152,921 Thanks
    silvercar
    • #2
    • 11th Oct 17, 6:54 PM
    • #2
    • 11th Oct 17, 6:54 PM
    Hardly mind blowing. If you have children close in age chances are they will be doing the same thing at the same time.
    • Ectophile
    • By Ectophile 11th Oct 17, 8:27 PM
    • 2,819 Posts
    • 1,738 Thanks
    Ectophile
    • #3
    • 11th Oct 17, 8:27 PM
    • #3
    • 11th Oct 17, 8:27 PM
    Many years ago, back in the days when students got grants rather than loans, and the local authority paid the tuition fees, my brother and I both went to university.

    Back then, there was a (not hidden) parental contribution system - the more your parents earned, the smaller your grant.

    When my brother and I were at university at the same time, there was a cut in the parental contribution per child, but it was still more than that for one child. So it doesn't look like much has changed in that respect.
    If it sticks, force it.
    If it breaks, well it wasn't working right anyway.
    • Iphigenia
    • By Iphigenia 11th Oct 17, 8:56 PM
    • 7 Posts
    • 7 Thanks
    Iphigenia
    • #4
    • 11th Oct 17, 8:56 PM
    • #4
    • 11th Oct 17, 8:56 PM
    I have two sons at Uni and they both only get the minimum maintenance loan. We pay their rent, so they try to live off the loan. The rent costs last year were between £139 & £149 per week each.

    This year the oldest one is attending a Uni in Japan on his year abroad. The tuition fees are £1,385 for the whole year. His accommodation costs are £180 per month. And his maintenance loan is £1,300 higher than his brother's.

    Which leads us all to wonder exactly why are UK undergraduate costs so high, that they need to borrow so much?
    • phillw
    • By phillw 12th Oct 17, 8:13 AM
    • 1,032 Posts
    • 619 Thanks
    phillw
    • #5
    • 12th Oct 17, 8:13 AM
    • #5
    • 12th Oct 17, 8:13 AM
    Which leads us all to wonder exactly why are UK undergraduate costs so high, that they need to borrow so much?
    Originally posted by Iphigenia
    It costs money to run universities. They used to have to beg for money from the government and from previous graduates and some of them were pretty grotty. Now they are funded directly & are able to invest in providing better services.
    Last edited by phillw; 12-10-2017 at 8:15 AM.
    • Mogley
    • By Mogley 13th Oct 17, 9:49 AM
    • 229 Posts
    • 188 Thanks
    Mogley
    • #6
    • 13th Oct 17, 9:49 AM
    • #6
    • 13th Oct 17, 9:49 AM
    Me and My sister were in Uni at the same time for two years 2002-2003. The loans system was means tested then so my parents had to contribute to our costs. Little has changed now so two years ago I started to pay small amounts regularly into a S&S ISA as my eldest dependant was 9 and second is 7 so that I could potentially subsidise my own if they wanted to go to university.


    My opinion is that the maximum maintenance loan amount should be increased to reflect actual living costs at university. Those from the lowest income families can then afford to live with no dependence. The maintenance loan should be means tested and information given to children's parents when they start secondary school education explaining the potential cost to them if their child chooses this path. Although the system may change in those 8 years, in principle, it has remained pretty much the same.
    No.25 for 2017 £1070/£4000 saved.
    You should pay attention to the needs of the moment - otherwise there is no future. But to ignore the future is foolish - living solely for the moment leaves nothing for when the next moment arrives.
    • michaels
    • By michaels 24th Oct 17, 10:25 PM
    • 19,905 Posts
    • 91,292 Thanks
    michaels
    • #7
    • 24th Oct 17, 10:25 PM
    • #7
    • 24th Oct 17, 10:25 PM
    Simple solution: Salary sacrifice to pension

    And why does uni in the UK cost so much? Employees pensions.
    Cool heads and compromise
    • Kim Giles
    • By Kim Giles 25th Oct 17, 8:01 AM
    • 1 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    Kim Giles
    • #8
    • 25th Oct 17, 8:01 AM
    A slightly fairer system?
    • #8
    • 25th Oct 17, 8:01 AM
    No government is going to fundamentally change the system anytime soon. Maybe an easier battle to fight would be to campaign for tax relief on the amount we are Ďexpectedí to give to our children. It is not a solution but it will be a start.
    • Psycholady6666
    • By Psycholady6666 25th Oct 17, 8:08 AM
    • 3 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Psycholady6666
    • #9
    • 25th Oct 17, 8:08 AM
    • #9
    • 25th Oct 17, 8:08 AM
    We earn jointly just over the limit so both our kids got the minimum loan of about £3500. kid1s hall at newcastle was £6k. we paid all so 3.5 k to live on. kid 2 was on a year in US as part of 4 yearcourse but we weren't eligible for travel grant cos not means tested so paid £3k in flights £1400 in health insurance £12 k in accommodation. and supplemented living loan by 5k, as so expensive. Parental contribution last year £21400. Nearly broke us. Beware year abroad in expensive country if you are on non means tested loan. Added to list arts subsidising science and resentment mounts. Neither will have well paid jobs.
    • Lorian
    • By Lorian 25th Oct 17, 8:09 AM
    • 4,122 Posts
    • 2,257 Thanks
    Lorian
    It costs money to run universities. They used to have to beg for money from the government and from previous graduates and some of them were pretty grotty. Now they are funded directly & are able to invest in providing better services.
    Originally posted by phillw
    yeah, better services like Bath University's vice-chancellor being serviced with £451K a year.
    • Psycholady6666
    • By Psycholady6666 25th Oct 17, 8:11 AM
    • 3 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Psycholady6666
    sorry miscalculated - parental contribution £ 27500 last year - not on fees but living.
    • Psycholady6666
    • By Psycholady6666 25th Oct 17, 8:46 AM
    • 3 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Psycholady6666
    two kids
    ditto see my post above and if you dont have the means tested loan you dont get any travel grant
    • EmmaM21
    • By EmmaM21 25th Oct 17, 11:10 AM
    • 1 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    EmmaM21
    When I was at uni years ago my parents had a good income so I didnít qualify for a loan or grant but my parents wouldnít give me any financial help so I just had to struggle, work multiple jobs etc. This has always been an issue if parents are unable or unwilling to help. Having 2 or more kids at uni at the same time is clearly really tricky but even if thereís an age gap parents will still be expected to fork out, the pain will just be dragged out longer instead. Government needs to decide if over 18s are ďindependent adultsĒ able to sign up for a lifetime of debt, or ďdependent childrenĒ relying on bank of mum and dad, at the moment itís whatever suits at the time and I agree it isnít made clear to students or their parents.
    • Madeleine99
    • By Madeleine99 25th Oct 17, 12:44 PM
    • 1 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Madeleine99
    Schools should be warning parents well ahead of time
    Thank you for this. With an income of £30000, and two gone to uni this year, with two still at home (one goes next year) - we actually have to top up by £1200 (i.e. £600 each) - a bit more than you suggest. The so-called 'allowance' is a scandal - and of course it typically comes at a time when child benefit is also lost - making an even bigger gap in income-expenditure. I don't know who did the sums, but they make no sense for anyone with more than one child.
    I think this is something that schools should be making parents aware of from Y7 onwards.
    Also - our income had reduced drastically from the year they used to calculate the initial amount (owing to spouse's ill health - can easily happen at this age)- it took a bit of hunting around to find that we could submit 'potential' figures and be assessed on those instead.
    Frankly if it weren't for a legacy, we would be having to say 'you must work' or suggest cheaper alternatives - one child does have a part time job already, but the second is just on short commons with hall fees of well over £7k [not London] and a long expensive journey home.
    • Mom of 3
    • By Mom of 3 25th Oct 17, 7:57 PM
    • 1 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Mom of 3
    My eldest son has just started university. His maintenance loan is less than his rent, hence we are paying his rent for him, and letting him use the loan to live on. When means testing parents why is our expenditure not taken into account? Mortgage repayments, car loans etc eat vastly into most peoples salaries yet these are not touched on - just the amount you earn. It worries me that for 2 years I will have to do this for 2 children together. In total if all 3 go to uni, which they could do, and they all cost me what the first year has cost, I will have paid £48 000 at the end of it all. By this point my husband will be 63 - and the government would also like us to be making adequate provision for our retirement. It just doesn’t all add up.
    Incidentally, my son is living in a University owned flat and on a corridor with 8 others. They share 3 toilets/ showers, and 1 kitchen, and the bedroom is basic, no wash basin or even carpet on the floor. Between the 9 of them the university collects £4602 in monthly rent. This is way over the top compared to private rental prices. I can’t even say it was well maintained when he moved in - paint peeling off the wall in places and dirty to add insult to injury.
    Last edited by Mom of 3; 25-10-2017 at 7:59 PM. Reason: Grammatical error
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

1,180Posts Today

6,749Users online

Martin's Twitter