Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@. Skimlinks & other affiliated links are turned on

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • Smokey2016
    • By Smokey2016 11th Oct 17, 11:14 AM
    • 1Posts
    • 0Thanks
    Smokey2016
    Confused😩😩😩
    • #1
    • 11th Oct 17, 11:14 AM
    Confused😩😩😩 11th Oct 17 at 11:14 AM
    I have been looking on the web about rooting / jailbreaking of mobile phones and voiding of statutory warranties.

    Some people say yes it is illegal, some people not.

    Then I came across this
    DIRECTIVE 1999/44/EC OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL

    This seems to imply that as long a phone was bought within the eu and you live in eu, then it is legal, as long as you done harm the hardware to make a fault.

    Now I am well confused.

    Please can you help
Page 1
    • Frozen_up_north
    • By Frozen_up_north 11th Oct 17, 11:24 AM
    • 1,298 Posts
    • 615 Thanks
    Frozen_up_north
    • #2
    • 11th Oct 17, 11:24 AM
    • #2
    • 11th Oct 17, 11:24 AM
    Loading pirate firmware will void the warranty, legal, or not. Plus you are at significant risk of malware that the manufacturers firmware is generally updated to minimise.
    • almillar
    • By almillar 11th Oct 17, 12:51 PM
    • 7,115 Posts
    • 2,859 Thanks
    almillar
    • #3
    • 11th Oct 17, 12:51 PM
    • #3
    • 11th Oct 17, 12:51 PM
    Er, it's not pirate firmware (implying stolen), simply unofficial.
    You'll have warranty problems, but it's perfectly legal to root or jaibreak your own phone, and/or install unofficial firmware. I don't do it until my warranty's up.
    Any manufacturer could claim that unofficial ROMs could damage the phone, for example by running the processor too fast and overheating.
    • JJ Egan
    • By JJ Egan 11th Oct 17, 4:33 PM
    • 9,943 Posts
    • 4,095 Thanks
    JJ Egan
    • #4
    • 11th Oct 17, 4:33 PM
    • #4
    • 11th Oct 17, 4:33 PM
    Op i can tell you that the warranty check list usually asks has the phone been rooted or non stock firmware installed .

    <<
    DIRECTIVE 1999/44/EC OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL

    This seems to imply that as long a phone was bought within the eu and you live in eu, then it is legal, as long as you done harm the hardware to make a fault.

    >>

    As to this directive you usually find that the manufacturer will reject it under their warranty terms and conditions .
    Your consumer rights would be against the vendor .

    But the biggest problem with rooting/ custom roms is users refusing to read the instructions and potentially bricking the phone .

    There has to be a valid reason to root a phone as it does nothing itself .
    • wunferall
    • By wunferall 11th Oct 17, 4:42 PM
    • 64 Posts
    • 132 Thanks
    wunferall
    • #5
    • 11th Oct 17, 4:42 PM
    • #5
    • 11th Oct 17, 4:42 PM
    If you look at the various resources aiding or discussing the rooting of phones you will see that they very often recommend keeping a backup original firmware of the phone which you should reinstall before returning if warranty work becomes necessary.
    The rooting/jailbreaking of phones is not illegal but as has been said, you will usually find that a manufacturer will reject any claim under warranty if non-original firmware is used.
    • esuhl
    • By esuhl 11th Oct 17, 6:03 PM
    • 7,773 Posts
    • 5,578 Thanks
    esuhl
    • #6
    • 11th Oct 17, 6:03 PM
    • #6
    • 11th Oct 17, 6:03 PM
    I can't see how it could possibly be illegal or invalidate your warranty. If you have problems, just unroot the phone before returning it for repair/replacement.
    • eDicky
    • By eDicky 11th Oct 17, 10:05 PM
    • 2,964 Posts
    • 1,304 Thanks
    eDicky
    • #7
    • 11th Oct 17, 10:05 PM
    • #7
    • 11th Oct 17, 10:05 PM
    I can't see how it could possibly be illegal or invalidate your warranty. If you have problems, just unroot the phone before returning it for repair/replacement.
    Originally posted by esuhl
    Unless the problem makes it impossible to operate the phone sufficiently to unroot it..?
    • esuhl
    • By esuhl 11th Oct 17, 10:51 PM
    • 7,773 Posts
    • 5,578 Thanks
    esuhl
    • #8
    • 11th Oct 17, 10:51 PM
    • #8
    • 11th Oct 17, 10:51 PM
    Unless the problem makes it impossible to operate the phone sufficiently to unroot it..?
    Originally posted by eDicky
    Fair point. But it's rare to completely brick a phone just by rooting it. I guess there's a chance that a warranty might be invalidated if you can't unroot it. However, I'd be surprised if it affected your statutory rights.

    It doesn't really matter whether it's legal or not. It's your phone and (risk of voiding a warranty notwithstanding) you can do what you like with it.

    Rooting is just like enabling UAC in Windows, or adding a user with Administrator rights. It's part of the basic functionality of the hardware to allow you to do this.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

213Posts Today

2,011Users online

Martin's Twitter