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    • suejb2
    • By suejb2 10th Oct 17, 2:51 PM
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    suejb2
    Detention
    • #1
    • 10th Oct 17, 2:51 PM
    Detention 10th Oct 17 at 2:51 PM
    Opinions please.

    My d.d is in year 10 ( 4th year in old money!). A teacher gives detention for not achieving ??% in assessments.
    My initial thought is this piles more pressure on the children my second thought it motivates them to achieve. In reality my d.d becomes more anxious and worries not only about the test but the possible detention.
    In my day ( there you have it I've turned into my mum) a detention was for being naughty: wagging school; smoking ; being rude; telling a teacher to 'do one'
    Life is like a bath, the longer you are in it the more wrinkly you become.
Page 3
    • Madmel
    • By Madmel 11th Oct 17, 11:22 PM
    • 624 Posts
    • 1,209 Thanks
    Madmel
    I'm somewhat surprised at Pinkshoes' comment about teachers giving lifts home. In my school, we are warned not to give any student a lift unless there are two or more students in the car, they are your own children (or friends of your children) or it is an emergency and you have parental permission. Our cars have to have business use to be able to do this and the school needs a copy of our insurance certificate.

    To return to the OP: I have a colleague who thinks she can make students stay behind after school if they get below a certain percentage in tests. Our catchment area is large and rural and 80% of students arrive on dedicated school buses so they and their parents are furious. As their form tutor, I have heard the complaints from both the students and their parents. I also know that a number of them have serious issues going on at home (parental illness requiring them to take on a young carer role for instance) that means that they simply cannot stay. Expecting a 15 year old whose dad is having chemo that day to get above 75% in a test is grossly unfair to both the child and the parent. If your child is correct, I would complain to the school as this is ridiculous.

    Yes, teachers do have bad days. I get cross with many of my irritating students on a regular basis. However, this has crossed a line for me and for the reasons above, needs bringing to the attention of management.
    • pinkshoes
    • By pinkshoes 12th Oct 17, 9:27 AM
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    pinkshoes
    I'm somewhat surprised at Pinkshoes' comment about teachers giving lifts home. In my school, we are warned not to give any student a lift unless there are two or more students in the car, they are your own children (or friends of your children) or it is an emergency and you have parental permission. Our cars have to have business use to be able to do this and the school needs a copy of our insurance certificate.
    Originally posted by Madmel
    We phone the parents and get their permission and also let another member of staff know what is happening. The parents can collect them later from school if they prefer. Or we have a late bus.

    Most parents are very supportive of the school and teachers, so it makes for a successful school with good results.

    If the child was a known trouble maker then they would certainly not be offered a lift home.
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    • pollypenny
    • By pollypenny 12th Oct 17, 9:40 AM
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    pollypenny
    Oh for a class of these perfect pupils!

    I didn't meet one in 28 years. Did anyone else?
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

    Words, words, they're all we have to go by!.

    (Pity they are mangled by this autocorrect!)
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 12th Oct 17, 10:28 AM
    • 1,748 Posts
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    Red-Squirrel
    Oh for a class of these perfect pupils!

    I didn't meet one in 28 years. Did anyone else?
    Originally posted by pollypenny
    Surely most kids are pretty nice, decent kids? Just as most adults are!
    • bunk bed
    • By bunk bed 12th Oct 17, 10:35 AM
    • 52 Posts
    • 52 Thanks
    bunk bed
    In my day ( there you have it I've turned into my mum) a detention was for being naughty: wagging school; smoking ; being rude; telling a teacher to 'do one'
    Originally posted by suejb2
    Exactly right. It replaced the cane, for disciplining unruly children. It could also be used for when a child didn't do their work, or forgot to bring it in, but never for failing to get a certain grade.
    • Tammykitty
    • By Tammykitty 12th Oct 17, 10:44 AM
    • 527 Posts
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    Tammykitty
    The homework was missing therefore my DD got a P7 (after school detention). She insisted she did it, it wasn't believed. I actually got a voicemail left saying that if my daughter was correct they'd have found it. I didn't get the voicemail as I was at work in an area of poor mobile signal. The homework was found handed in during the duration of the detention, they still refused to let my DD leave.

    I've given up trying to get my head round what the school is doing. They just want to take every child, watch it all day long until they do something and then dish out a punishment. As I said on my first post on here I'm counting down the days till my daughter leaves (June 2019 )
    Originally posted by Spendless

    That makes sense, as they have told you the parent, that the child will leave school at 5pm, they can't let them out at 4.30pm then unless they have your permission.


    From what I remember, the parents needs to give permission for detention, and in some cases, they don't give the permission and there is nothing the school can do.


    In my schools, some children used to get a ferry to school, and they were often exempted from Detention due to issues with the ferry, and they actually got to leave early quite often too, I think they were often given lunch time detention instead.
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    • suejb2
    • By suejb2 12th Oct 17, 11:35 AM
    • 1,255 Posts
    • 1,883 Thanks
    suejb2
    To return to the OP: I have a colleague who thinks she can make students stay behind after school if they get below a certain percentage in tests. Our catchment area is large and rural and 80% of students arrive on dedicated school buses so they and their parents are furious. As their form tutor, I have heard the complaints from both the students and their parents. I also know that a number of them have serious issues going on at home (parental illness requiring them to take on a young carer role for instance) that means that they simply cannot stay. Expecting a 15 year old whose dad is having chemo that day to get above 75% in a test is grossly unfair to both the child and the parent. If your child is correct, I would complain to the school as this is ridiculous.

    Yes, teachers do have bad days. I get cross with many of my irritating students on a regular basis. However, this has crossed a line for me and for the reasons above, needs bringing to the attention of management.[/QUOTE]

    Madmel thank you for your thoughts I am erring on it being ridiculous, and I do want to go or write in. What I don't want is to cause my d.d any more angst it's a fine line ,again thank you.
    Life is like a bath, the longer you are in it the more wrinkly you become.
    • pollypenny
    • By pollypenny 12th Oct 17, 1:16 PM
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    pollypenny
    Surely most kids are pretty nice, decent kids? Just as most adults are!
    Originally posted by Red-Squirrel


    Indeed they are. I loved the buzz of working with teenagers. However, there are those whose behaviour or work ethic is, shall we say, challenging.
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

    Words, words, they're all we have to go by!.

    (Pity they are mangled by this autocorrect!)
    • IAmWales
    • By IAmWales 12th Oct 17, 2:22 PM
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    IAmWales

    Madmel thank you for your thoughts I am erring on it being ridiculous, and I do want to go or write in. What I don't want is to cause my d.d any more angst it's a fine line ,again thank you.
    Originally posted by suejb2
    Why not just call the teacher and ask? You would be ridiculous to pass judgment without checking the facts.
    • FBaby
    • By FBaby 12th Oct 17, 4:23 PM
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    FBaby
    I'm still confused as to whether OP's child was asked to stay behind for revision or punishment purposes?

    Our school selects some children who under-perform to their target and are told to stay after school for extra tuition. Some teachers actually offer their time after school and many year 10/11 opt to stay for these revisions. Even more dedicated are the GCSE teachers who know that a colleague are dreadful, feel bad for the kids, and therefore create after school learning sessions for the kids who've asked them for it.

    That's all very different to a detention which in my school is too punish bad behaviour. As stated though, these are handed to really make a point not to tick boxes.
    • balletshoes
    • By balletshoes 12th Oct 17, 6:59 PM
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    balletshoes
    Why not just call the teacher and ask?
    Originally posted by IAmWales
    yep, thats what I would do, I would call the school and ask them for an explanation of what this detention was actually for.
    • suejb2
    • By suejb2 12th Oct 17, 7:19 PM
    • 1,255 Posts
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    suejb2
    Detention
    yep, thats what I would do, I would call the school and ask them for an explanation of what this detention was actually for.
    Originally posted by balletshoes
    The students that didn't get 77% are staying an extra hour tomorrow after school to re-sit the test. It's not being logged on the school gateway system as a detention by the teacher, make of that what you want!
    My d.d exceeded the mark but if the same 'threat' is given next time and it makes her more anxious or it doesn't bother her yet she doesn't make the pass then I will be having my say.
    Appreciate all opinions, thank you.
    Life is like a bath, the longer you are in it the more wrinkly you become.
    • bunk bed
    • By bunk bed 12th Oct 17, 7:24 PM
    • 52 Posts
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    bunk bed
    The students that didn't get 77% are staying an extra hour tomorrow after school to re-sit the test.
    Originally posted by suejb2
    Good lord.

    They'd have got a few verbals if they'd tried that on us at school. And not just from the pupils!!
    • balletshoes
    • By balletshoes 12th Oct 17, 7:29 PM
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    balletshoes
    The students that didn't get 77% are staying an extra hour tomorrow after school to re-sit the test. It's not being logged on the school gateway system as a detention by the teacher, make of that what you want!
    My d.d exceeded the mark but if the same 'threat' is given next time and it makes her more anxious or it doesn't bother her yet she doesn't make the pass then I will be having my say.
    Appreciate all opinions, thank you.
    Originally posted by suejb2
    how do you know thats what's happening? I'm asking because with our secondary school parents got a letter home prior to a study period or detention. The letter would explain why the session was taking place. We didn't get anything like that for individual parents on the school website etc.
    • suejb2
    • By suejb2 12th Oct 17, 7:44 PM
    • 1,255 Posts
    • 1,883 Thanks
    suejb2
    Detention
    how do you know thats what's happening? I'm asking because with our secondary school parents got a letter home prior to a study period or detention. The letter would explain why the session was taking place. We didn't get anything like that for individual parents on the school website etc.
    Originally posted by balletshoes


    The school uses Gateway system . Everything is online. Any attainments, behaviour, attendance, is communicated via this app, on top of that we get an text whenever this is updated.
    As I said, this teacher hasn't marked it as a detention so don't know how he has explained it to the parents. I'll fight my d.ds corner over this but because she isn't involved this particular time I'm prepared to "watch this space"
    Life is like a bath, the longer you are in it the more wrinkly you become.
    • IAmWales
    • By IAmWales 12th Oct 17, 7:52 PM
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    IAmWales
    The school uses Gateway system . Everything is online. Any attainments, behaviour, attendance, is communicated via this app, on top of that we get an text whenever this is updated.
    As I said, this teacher hasn't marked it as a detention so don't know how he has explained it to the parents. I'll fight my d.ds corner over this but because she isn't involved this particular time I'm prepared to "watch this space"
    Originally posted by suejb2
    How many times do you need to be told, ask the teacher! You're talking about fighting your daughter's corner, you don't even know what really happened.
    • balletshoes
    • By balletshoes 12th Oct 17, 8:13 PM
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    balletshoes
    The school uses Gateway system . Everything is online. Any attainments, behaviour, attendance, is communicated via this app, on top of that we get an text whenever this is updated.
    As I said, this teacher hasn't marked it as a detention so don't know how he has explained it to the parents. I'll fight my d.ds corner over this but because she isn't involved this particular time I'm prepared to "watch this space"
    Originally posted by suejb2
    so as its not marked as a detention on the school system, that would suggest to me that its not a detention. It may not even be mandatory, just an extra revision session set up by the teacher, in their time, as a supportive measure for the students who need extra support to reach their potential (is that % representative of a GSCE grade in particular perhaps?). In year 11 (ie earlier this year) my daughter attended several support sessions at her school for Maths, the teachers gave up their own free time to facilitate these for the pupils, and pupils were invited to attend if it was felt they were capable of achieving a C (number grade 4 or 5) but they weren't attaining that in their tests.
    • ska lover
    • By ska lover 12th Oct 17, 11:13 PM
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    ska lover
    And how do you categorise all the pupils who not only couldn't be bothered for themselves - they were also disrupting the education of the other pupils who could be bothered? But weren't allowed to, because of the behaviour of their classmates.

    What about the parents who couldn't be bothered with their children or their education?

    Those groups also exist. What are your views on them?
    Originally posted by coolcait
    What are your views? You seem to have something you want to get off your chest..

    Do you have an opinion you would like to share?
    Blah blah blah.
    • Ames
    • By Ames 12th Oct 17, 11:18 PM
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    Ames
    How many times do you need to be told, ask the teacher! You're talking about fighting your daughter's corner, you don't even know what really happened.
    Originally posted by IAmWales
    The OPs daughter hasn't been given a detention/extra study session/whatever it is (she says so in the post you quoted). I don't think the teacher would appreciate a random parent phoning up to ask what's happening with other students.
    Unless I say otherwise 'you' means the general you not you specifically.

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    • maman
    • By maman 12th Oct 17, 11:30 PM
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    maman
    How many times do you need to be told, ask the teacher! You're talking about fighting your daughter's corner, you don't even know what really happened.
    Originally posted by IAmWales
    OP isn't asking because her own daughter isn't involved.

    I can't believe a teacher would want to stay after school on a Friday unless improving on their marks was important for the pupils involved. We now know it's not a detention after all. Maybe he's not happy with how these pupils are approaching Y10. Maybe last year's assessments show they are capable of better.

    OP obviously got the word detention from somewhere, hence the name of the thread. I'm assuming it maybe feels like a detention to be asked to work after school on a Friday! Child cruelty!
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