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    • suejb2
    • By suejb2 10th Oct 17, 2:51 PM
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    suejb2
    Detention
    • #1
    • 10th Oct 17, 2:51 PM
    Detention 10th Oct 17 at 2:51 PM
    Opinions please.

    My d.d is in year 10 ( 4th year in old money!). A teacher gives detention for not achieving ??% in assessments.
    My initial thought is this piles more pressure on the children my second thought it motivates them to achieve. In reality my d.d becomes more anxious and worries not only about the test but the possible detention.
    In my day ( there you have it I've turned into my mum) a detention was for being naughty: wagging school; smoking ; being rude; telling a teacher to 'do one'
    Life is like a bath, the longer you are in it the more wrinkly you become.
Page 2
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 11th Oct 17, 12:39 AM
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    PasturesNew

    Why shouldn't the student also think about it, and knuckle down to behaving well and doing his/her best?
    Originally posted by coolcait
    Because the "detention" was awarded for getting <X% in any particular piece of work set by the teacher....

    Maybe the student was thick and was doing their best, or they misread the question or made a daft mistake in error, or they were ill that day, or the teacher was so carp they never understood that little bit, or they hadn't slept well the night before, or had a worrying appointment after school, or was worried about a sick relative .... and because they got 1 mark under the requirement they're punished.

    The "detention" wasn't to be awarded for giving the teacher the finger and telling them where they can stick their arbitrary rules.
    • coolcait
    • By coolcait 11th Oct 17, 12:44 AM
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    coolcait
    Because the "detention" was awarded for getting <X% in any particular piece of work set by the teacher....

    Maybe the student was thick and was doing their best, or they misread the question or made a daft mistake in error, or they were ill that day, or the teacher was so carp they never understood that little bit, or they hadn't slept well the night before, or had a worrying appointment after school, or was worried about a sick relative .... and because they got 1 mark under the requirement they're punished.

    The "detention" wasn't to be awarded for giving the teacher the finger and telling them where they can stick their arbitrary rules.
    Originally posted by PasturesNew
    Or maybe none of the above happened, but that's what the student told mum and dad.

    Also, getting detention for 'giving the teacher the finger' etc would be an introduction to life 'in the real world'.
    • Spendless
    • By Spendless 11th Oct 17, 7:27 AM
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    Spendless
    Mine's had a 'dentention' before for not handing in homework. She claimed otherwise. The missing homework was later found on a pile of paperwork on the teacher's desk. It was discovered whilst DD was doing the detention, she still wasn't allowed to leave.

    Where's the punishment when teacher slips up? (as we all do because we're human but if you're a school kid that's not allowed without punishment)
    • pollypenny
    • By pollypenny 11th Oct 17, 9:01 AM
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    pollypenny
    Had it been me at school, that would have had you there until at least 6pm, possibly closer to 8pm, which would potentially be the earliest one of my parents could have got there to collect me, and you would have had to remain, because of duty of care. You would have prevented me from using the only method of transport available apart from a 12 mile walk, some of which was along unlit national speed limit single track roads with no pavement, so you personally would have become responsible for my safety.

    I came home on a school bus (45 minute journey) and arriving home at 4.45pm was always home before either parent. So mum would have had to wait for my brother, who went to a different school and got home later, then get in the car (if dad didn't have it, otherwise she might have been waiting to beyond 7pm for him to get back from doing overtime, which he had to do to pay the mortgage when the rate was ovver 15%) and drive another 45 minutes to the school to collect me. Then drive home, then cook dinner and when exactly homework would have got done is anyone's guess.

    I wondered what teachers thought about when handing out detentions like smarties. Certainly not how the child will get home once the school bus has gone, given that the reason the school bus existed was no public transport was available.
    Originally posted by onomatopoeia99


    It's not the teacher's job to arrange transport for pupils. Once the parents are informed that the pupil will not be catching the school bus - for sport, music, drama or detention - transport is down parents.

    The hours I spent freezing outside school waiting for the odd parent to pick pupils up after a theatre trip were annoying! This is in spite of letters.

    Before most had mobiles, of course,
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

    Words, words, they're all we have to go by!.

    (Pity they are mangled by this autocorrect!)
    • pollypenny
    • By pollypenny 11th Oct 17, 9:04 AM
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    pollypenny
    Mine's had a 'dentention' before for not handing in homework. She claimed otherwise. The missing homework was later found on a pile of paperwork on the teacher's desk. It was discovered whilst DD was doing the detention, she still wasn't allowed to leave.

    Where's the punishment when teacher slips up? (as we all do because we're human but if you're a school kid that's not allowed without punishment)
    Originally posted by Spendless


    Do you think teachers issue punishments for a rare 'slip up'?
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

    Words, words, they're all we have to go by!.

    (Pity they are mangled by this autocorrect!)
    • onomatopoeia99
    • By onomatopoeia99 11th Oct 17, 10:24 AM
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    onomatopoeia99
    Do you think teachers issue punishments for a rare 'slip up'?
    Originally posted by pollypenny
    In my experience of being a pupil, yes. There were plenty of good teachers, but a fair smattering of petty and vindictive ones, some with no control of their temper. And one sex abuser of teenage boys.
    INTP, nerd, libertarian and scifi geek.
    Home is where my books are.
    • NaughtiusMaximus
    • By NaughtiusMaximus 11th Oct 17, 11:03 AM
    • 527 Posts
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    NaughtiusMaximus
    I often used to wonder if teachers were living in the real world when handing out detentions. We used to have a teacher who would give you a detention for scraping your chair and another who would give you detention for not ruling a line straight enough
    Originally posted by ska lover
    I was once given a detention for farting in class.

    To be fair they were rather loud and being a 12 year old boy I was proud of that fact
    Last edited by NaughtiusMaximus; 11-10-2017 at 11:21 AM.
    • maman
    • By maman 11th Oct 17, 12:19 PM
    • 17,128 Posts
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    maman
    It's not the teacher's job to arrange transport for pupils. Once the parents are informed that the pupil will not be catching the school bus - for sport, music, drama or detention - transport is down parents.
    Originally posted by pollypenny

    It's a sad fact that when categorising schools there is little or no account given to the fact that some pupils will have unsupportive parents, difficult home circumstances, bring in bad behaviour from outside school etc. etc. All that matters is exam results and league tables.


    So schools adopt a zero tolerance to uniform, behaviour, homework, hairstyles.....and go down the detention route and eventually to exclusion. The parents of those pupils get thoroughly pi**ed off because they have to collect their offspring from school or look after them at home and take them away from the school. Result! School now has only pupils who behave well, work hard, wear a smart uniform and pass exams!


    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3775968/Police-called-school-sends-FIFTY-children-home-day-term-weren-t-wearing-right-uniform.html


    http://www.mirror.co.uk/tv/tv-news/piers-morgan-lashes-out-parent-11161015
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 11th Oct 17, 1:08 PM
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    Red-Squirrel
    Do you think teachers issue punishments for a rare 'slip up'?
    Originally posted by pollypenny
    It sounds like it in that example, which was the poster's own child they were talking about.

    I'm sure most don't, but there are teachers who are burned out and sick of the kids and not always perfectly fair.

    My bugbear at school was whole class detentions. Punishing all for the actions of a few.
    • Malthusian
    • By Malthusian 11th Oct 17, 2:40 PM
    • 3,435 Posts
    • 5,271 Thanks
    Malthusian
    So schools adopt a zero tolerance to uniform, behaviour, homework, hairstyles.....and go down the detention route and eventually to exclusion. The parents of those pupils get thoroughly pi**ed off because they have to collect their offspring from school or look after them at home and take them away from the school. Result! School now has only pupils who behave well, work hard, wear a smart uniform and pass exams!
    Originally posted by maman
    Sounds awful.

    So 60 children stage a riot after being sent home for not wearing school uniform (you're not going to tell me that all 60 had to wear trainers due to hip pain) and their parents predictably join in with the children.

    In ten years' time they'll be claiming it's the government's fault their children have no qualifications and are on benefits or minimum wage. "There is some confusion over whether black trainers count as shoes." Jesus wept. Ask any job interviewer if you're confused over whether trainers are shoes.

    Society eh.
    • Loz01
    • By Loz01 11th Oct 17, 2:48 PM
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    Loz01
    Mine's had a 'dentention' before for not handing in homework. She claimed otherwise. The missing homework was later found on a pile of paperwork on the teacher's desk. It was discovered whilst DD was doing the detention, she still wasn't allowed to leave.
    Originally posted by Spendless
    Wow this reminded me of something similar that happened to me at school!! Im 30 now so this was at least 15 years ago, but still. I gave the homework in, the teacher stacked it all up with her personal files, lo and behold she ended up accidently taking my homework home with her.... got a detention for no homework.

    Teacher then came to me the day of the detention, told me she'd found it at her house but I still had to attend the detention........... which went down a treat as you can imagine lol. I point blank refused and was sent to my very strict head of year. Who immediately told me I didn't have to go to detention. Pointless
    More people have been slaughtered in the name of religion than for any other single reason. That, my friends, is a true perversion - Harvey Milk
    • sheramber
    • By sheramber 11th Oct 17, 3:18 PM
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    sheramber
    My teachers were out of the school asap.

    One teacher let her last class out earl so that she could get on the school bus before the rabble arrived.

    She was popular as the last teacher of the day.
    • Spendless
    • By Spendless 11th Oct 17, 7:20 PM
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    Spendless
    Do you think teachers issue punishments for a rare 'slip up'?
    Originally posted by pollypenny
    I KNOW that they do. The school directive is ANY piece of missed homework is an automatic after-school 'detention' (period 7)This directive comes from the dictator headteacher. It wouldn't matter if you were 16 and it was the first homework you'd missed in 5 years, the punishment is automatic that you get one.

    I'd also say my child's school was not a sink school in need of turning round. I've lived in the town for 45 years and in this village on and off since the late 70s. I'm very familiar with the school as it's my old one. Ridiculous rulings started coming in gradually around 18 months ago. It was a good school that didn't need to make improvements because it had loads of unruly kids, it didn't. It's just decided that every child who slips up is 'naughty' and has to be punished.
    Last edited by Spendless; 11-10-2017 at 8:57 PM.
    • onomatopoeia99
    • By onomatopoeia99 11th Oct 17, 8:51 PM
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    onomatopoeia99
    My bugbear at school was whole class detentions. Punishing all for the actions of a few.
    Originally posted by Red-Squirrel
    Hopefully not given by a history teacher, who should know that Aticle 33 of the fourth Geneva convention, to which the UK has been a signatory since 1957, forbids collective punishments and declares those giving them out to be war criminals.

    I wonder how many war criminals we have teaching in our schools?
    INTP, nerd, libertarian and scifi geek.
    Home is where my books are.
    • Gloomendoom
    • By Gloomendoom 11th Oct 17, 9:31 PM
    • 13,250 Posts
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    Gloomendoom
    Hopefully not given by a history teacher, who should know that Aticle 33 of the fourth Geneva convention, to which the UK has been a signatory since 1957, forbids collective punishments and declares those giving them out to be war criminals.

    I wonder how many war criminals we have teaching in our schools?
    Originally posted by onomatopoeia99
    Very few I should imagine.

    The Geneva convention is irrelevant in peacetime.
    Advice; it rhymes with mice. Advise; it rhymes with wise.
    • pinkshoes
    • By pinkshoes 11th Oct 17, 10:00 PM
    • 15,386 Posts
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    pinkshoes
    Had it been me at school, that would have had you there until at least 6pm, possibly closer to 8pm, which would potentially be the earliest one of my parents could have got there to collect me, and you would have had to remain, because of duty of care. You would have prevented me from using the only method of transport available apart from a 12 mile walk, some of which was along unlit national speed limit single track roads with no pavement, so you personally would have become responsible for my safety.

    I came home on a school bus (45 minute journey) and arriving home at 4.45pm was always home before either parent. So mum would have had to wait for my brother, who went to a different school and got home later, then get in the car (if dad didn't have it, otherwise she might have been waiting to beyond 7pm for him to get back from doing overtime, which he had to do to pay the mortgage when the rate was ovver 15%) and drive another 45 minutes to the school to collect me. Then drive home, then cook dinner and when exactly homework would have got done is anyone's guess.

    I wondered what teachers thought about when handing out detentions like smarties. Certainly not how the child will get home once the school bus has gone, given that the reason the school bus existed was no public transport was available.
    Originally posted by onomatopoeia99
    In which case you would therefore put the effort in and revise for a test not to inconvenience your parents surely...?

    You are very quick to jump to assumptions about all teachers.

    I did indeed have someone in your scenario, and I agreed with the parent that the test would be done at home under supervision.

    There are many teachers at school until 7pm at least, and we also give lifts home to kids who have missed a bus.
    Should've = Should HAVE (not 'of')
    Would've = Would HAVE (not 'of')

    No, I am not perfect, but yes I do judge people on their use of basic English language. If you didn't know the above, then learn it! (If English is your second language, then you are forgiven!)
    • onomatopoeia99
    • By onomatopoeia99 11th Oct 17, 10:11 PM
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    onomatopoeia99
    Very few I should imagine.

    The Geneva convention is irrelevant in peacetime.
    Originally posted by Gloomendoom
    Indeed, though I made the point as collective punishment is no more just in peacetime than in war, and is an appalling example for any adult to set to a child, never mind a professional in a position of trust.
    INTP, nerd, libertarian and scifi geek.
    Home is where my books are.
    • Brighton belle
    • By Brighton belle 11th Oct 17, 10:26 PM
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    Brighton belle

    Teacher then came to me the day of the detention, told me she'd found it at her house but I still had to attend the detention........... which went down a treat as you can imagine lol. I point blank refused and was sent to my very strict head of year. Who immediately told me I didn't have to go to detention. Pointless
    Originally posted by Loz01
    I can't get my head round this... what possible grounds did the teacher have for insisting you attend the detention? Ditto for Spendless's daughter.
    I try to take one day at a time, but sometimes several days attack me at once
    • Spendless
    • By Spendless 11th Oct 17, 10:48 PM
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    Spendless
    I can't get my head round this... what possible grounds did the teacher have for insisting you attend the detention? Ditto for Spendless's daughter.
    Originally posted by Brighton belle
    The homework was missing therefore my DD got a P7 (after school detention). She insisted she did it, it wasn't believed. I actually got a voicemail left saying that if my daughter was correct they'd have found it. I didn't get the voicemail as I was at work in an area of poor mobile signal. The homework was found handed in during the duration of the detention, they still refused to let my DD leave.

    I've given up trying to get my head round what the school is doing. They just want to take every child, watch it all day long until they do something and then dish out a punishment. As I said on my first post on here I'm counting down the days till my daughter leaves (June 2019 )
    • onomatopoeia99
    • By onomatopoeia99 11th Oct 17, 11:08 PM
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    onomatopoeia99
    In which case you would therefore put the effort in and revise for a test not to inconvenience your parents surely...?

    You are very quick to jump to assumptions about all teachers.
    Originally posted by pinkshoes
    Only those who say they would give a detention for getting a low mark on a test. The inconvenience is caused by the person handing out the detention, they are the trained professional in a position of trust who has to exercise their judgement when making decisions, the other party is a child. If you are indeed a professional you cannot put the responsibility for the consequences of your decisions onto those in your care.

    And before you make assumptions about me, I did not get any detentions at school or other personal punishments and was top of the class in maths, all three sciences and modern languages, and got at least passing grades in the other subjects. I was the class swot that always did the homework properly, always as well as I was able. Naturally I got bullied for it, being very shy didn't help, and was also rubbish at sport so got bullied for that as well (this time by the games teachers rather than other pupils though, they seemed to take my inability as a personal insult).

    I had plenty of good teachers, but also some that were just appalling people.
    INTP, nerd, libertarian and scifi geek.
    Home is where my books are.
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