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    • suejb2
    • By suejb2 10th Oct 17, 2:51 PM
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    suejb2
    Detention
    • #1
    • 10th Oct 17, 2:51 PM
    Detention 10th Oct 17 at 2:51 PM
    Opinions please.

    My d.d is in year 10 ( 4th year in old money!). A teacher gives detention for not achieving ??% in assessments.
    My initial thought is this piles more pressure on the children my second thought it motivates them to achieve. In reality my d.d becomes more anxious and worries not only about the test but the possible detention.
    In my day ( there you have it I've turned into my mum) a detention was for being naughty: wagging school; smoking ; being rude; telling a teacher to 'do one'
    Life is like a bath, the longer you are in it the more wrinkly you become.
Page 1
    • Comms69
    • By Comms69 10th Oct 17, 2:55 PM
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    Comms69
    • #2
    • 10th Oct 17, 2:55 PM
    • #2
    • 10th Oct 17, 2:55 PM
    If detention is used to look at the work again and improve effective study, it seems reasonable.


    If kids just sit there and do nothing it seems less reasonable.
    • lillie421
    • By lillie421 10th Oct 17, 3:03 PM
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    lillie421
    • #3
    • 10th Oct 17, 3:03 PM
    • #3
    • 10th Oct 17, 3:03 PM
    I completely agree with you. Detention is for when a child does something naughty like you said. Basically, the teacher is punishing children for not being 'clever enough'.
    Do you have any idea if it is just this particular teacher who does this or is it a school rule?
    I would find this out and if it is just this particular teacher who carries out this rule then I would definitely take it further and talk to the head teacher about it. That shouldn't be allowed.
    Good luck!
    • peachyprice
    • By peachyprice 10th Oct 17, 3:03 PM
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    peachyprice
    • #4
    • 10th Oct 17, 3:03 PM
    • #4
    • 10th Oct 17, 3:03 PM
    It depends on why the target wasn't achieved and what the detention will be used for.

    Did the teacher spend a lot of time with the class to help them achieve their targets in so much as if the target wasn't achieved could the teacher feel it was because they weren't paying attention?

    Is the detention to be used as a session to go over the topic again for those who missed their targets so that the whole class can then move on?
    Accept your past without regret, handle your present with confidence and face your future without fear
    • Fireflyaway
    • By Fireflyaway 10th Oct 17, 3:07 PM
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    Fireflyaway
    • #5
    • 10th Oct 17, 3:07 PM
    • #5
    • 10th Oct 17, 3:07 PM
    I agree that detention should be for bad behavior, not under achieving. Unless the child was actually mucking about during the test or cheated or sat there and didn't even try.
    • Lingua
    • By Lingua 10th Oct 17, 3:37 PM
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    Lingua
    • #6
    • 10th Oct 17, 3:37 PM
    • #6
    • 10th Oct 17, 3:37 PM
    If it's not a formal detention, and the teacher will sit down in that time and discuss the test with the student, then I see no issue. It's a way of ensuring the pupil turns up to discuss problems and methods for improvement.

    If however the detention is a true 'detention', then it is very unfair as there are no doubt many reasons why a student doesn't attain a certain %. Not least, less able students or those with poor home lives will suffer most. Perhaps have a kind word with the teacher in question and see what it's all about?

    Lingua
    Long-Term Goal: £14'000 / £40'000 mortgage downpayment (2020)
    • HappyLassie13
    • By HappyLassie13 10th Oct 17, 3:52 PM
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    HappyLassie13
    • #7
    • 10th Oct 17, 3:52 PM
    • #7
    • 10th Oct 17, 3:52 PM
    Personally, I think it shouldn't be called a "dentention". The students who don't reach the % set by the teacher should return for a study session, but its harsh to use a term meant for punishment.
    • pinkshoes
    • By pinkshoes 10th Oct 17, 4:05 PM
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    pinkshoes
    • #8
    • 10th Oct 17, 4:05 PM
    • #8
    • 10th Oct 17, 4:05 PM
    It depends if the % is against their own target of what they are capable of.

    I really HATE it when I have a bright pupil that puts no effort into revision and does badly in a test.

    I would then phone their parents and have them stay behind after school for an hour in a 'detention' where they can resit the test.

    This prevents laziness but only punishes those who have put no effort in, which is usually obvious.
    Should've = Should HAVE (not 'of')
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    • pollypenny
    • By pollypenny 10th Oct 17, 4:42 PM
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    pollypenny
    • #9
    • 10th Oct 17, 4:42 PM
    • #9
    • 10th Oct 17, 4:42 PM
    Pupils have been known to fudge what they tell their parents.

    It's unlikely that any teacher would give a detention simply for a low mark.
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

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    • maman
    • By maman 10th Oct 17, 5:02 PM
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    maman
    Pupils have been known to fudge what they tell their parents.

    It's unlikely that any teacher would give a detention simply for a low mark.
    Originally posted by pollypenny
    This is certainly a possibility.

    It depends on why the target wasn't achieved and what the detention will be used for.

    Did the teacher spend a lot of time with the class to help them achieve their targets in so much as if the target wasn't achieved could the teacher feel it was because they weren't paying attention?

    Is the detention to be used as a session to go over the topic again for those who missed their targets so that the whole class can then move on?
    Originally posted by peachyprice
    I'd say it's difficult for a teacher to be 100% sure but if (s)he's confident that the pupils given detention haven't put in enough effort or messed about in the lesson then it's fine with me. Ideally all detention would be constructive but sometimes it's a case of taking away some free time from pupils who have wasted lesson time with bad behaviour or minimal work.
    • skattykatty
    • By skattykatty 10th Oct 17, 5:23 PM
    • 385 Posts
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    skattykatty
    Detaining a student in a formal manner called detention is ONLY to check behaviour.

    If a child has under-achieved in a test, then that requires reflection by both teacher and student. Be great to spend some time to do that together and that, as I used to do many moons ago, is something offered and agreed between the two usually during a break or part of lunchtime. If it needs more time after school, that needs to be communicated to parents and agreed.
    • cjdavies
    • By cjdavies 10th Oct 17, 7:12 PM
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    cjdavies
    R u sure u r gettin the whole story from ur child?
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 10th Oct 17, 7:15 PM
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    PasturesNew
    The fear of detention would make me go in the opposite direction and I'd simply not bother to do the assignment, fearing a low score would be a detention so "I might as well just have the detention without the stress".

    It's an inappropriate response to a poor mark.
    • onomatopoeia99
    • By onomatopoeia99 10th Oct 17, 8:04 PM
    • 3,433 Posts
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    onomatopoeia99
    I would then phone their parents and have them stay behind after school for an hour in a 'detention' where they can resit the test.
    Originally posted by pinkshoes
    Had it been me at school, that would have had you there until at least 6pm, possibly closer to 8pm, which would potentially be the earliest one of my parents could have got there to collect me, and you would have had to remain, because of duty of care. You would have prevented me from using the only method of transport available apart from a 12 mile walk, some of which was along unlit national speed limit single track roads with no pavement, so you personally would have become responsible for my safety.

    I came home on a school bus (45 minute journey) and arriving home at 4.45pm was always home before either parent. So mum would have had to wait for my brother, who went to a different school and got home later, then get in the car (if dad didn't have it, otherwise she might have been waiting to beyond 7pm for him to get back from doing overtime, which he had to do to pay the mortgage when the rate was ovver 15%) and drive another 45 minutes to the school to collect me. Then drive home, then cook dinner and when exactly homework would have got done is anyone's guess.

    I wondered what teachers thought about when handing out detentions like smarties. Certainly not how the child will get home once the school bus has gone, given that the reason the school bus existed was no public transport was available.
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    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 10th Oct 17, 8:11 PM
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    PasturesNew

    I really HATE it when I have a bright pupil that puts no effort into revision and does badly in a test.

    I would then phone their parents and have them stay behind after school for an hour in a 'detention' where they can resit the test.
    Originally posted by pinkshoes
    Not all homes have an environment where homework's possible - and, for many, phoning the parent would just get the kid a b0ll0cking, so they feel less encouraged to even bother... some parents will just beat the child down with telling them how useless they are, using phone calls from the school as proof they're right and the kid's useless.

    I rarely did homework because by the time I got home, the table was laid for tea, then we'd have tea, then mum/dad/sibling would be watching the telly - and there was no heating in any other rooms and no table anywhere else. There was no "space" to do it, nowhere quiet/fit for purpose.
    • Spendless
    • By Spendless 10th Oct 17, 10:38 PM
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    Spendless
    In my daughter's school (she's also yr10) they have 're-branded' after school detentions as Period 7s and they get them for anything, forgetting their homework, not doing well enough for a test, not concentrating in class, having a piece of missing pe kit eg a sock and so it goes on.

    Like anything if you flood the market you devalue something, this is as true with punishments as it is gold bullion bars or diamonds.

    If it was feasible to send mine somewhere else I would (I'm getting similar reports about other schools too). I'm just thankful that DD is my youngest, there's less than 2 years left and that she has no wish to go to a school sixth form.

    Sorry OP this probably doesn't help you at all, I just wanted you to know you weren't alone.
    • Spendless
    • By Spendless 10th Oct 17, 10:55 PM
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    Spendless
    The fear of detention would make me go in the opposite direction and I'd simply not bother to do the assignment, fearing a low score would be a detention so "I might as well just have the detention without the stress".

    It's an inappropriate response to a poor mark.
    Originally posted by PasturesNew
    ^^^^ This was the attitude my eldest used to take when the school first started becoming stricter. He used to not bother doing the work, in the knowledge he'd be kept behind the following day and have to do it then.

    What changed for him was going to a FE college after GCSE's and when the staff started treating him differently to what school had, they got a whole different outcome from him.
    • ska lover
    • By ska lover 11th Oct 17, 12:06 AM
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    ska lover
    Had it been me at school, that would have had you there until at least 6pm, possibly closer to 8pm, which would potentially be the earliest one of my parents could have got there to collect me, and you would have had to remain, because of duty of care. You would have prevented me from using the only method of transport available apart from a 12 mile walk, some of which was along unlit national speed limit single track roads with no pavement, so you personally would have become responsible for my safety.

    I came home on a school bus (45 minute journey) and arriving home at 4.45pm was always home before either parent. So mum would have had to wait for my brother, who went to a different school and got home later, then get in the car (if dad didn't have it, otherwise she might have been waiting to beyond 7pm for him to get back from doing overtime, which he had to do to pay the mortgage when the rate was ovver 15%) and drive another 45 minutes to the school to collect me. Then drive home, then cook dinner and when exactly homework would have got done is anyone's guess.

    I wondered what teachers thought about when handing out detentions like smarties. Certainly not how the child will get home once the school bus has gone, given that the reason the school bus existed was no public transport was available.
    Originally posted by onomatopoeia99
    I often used to wonder if teachers were living in the real world when handing out detentions. We used to have a teacher who would give you a detention for scraping your chair and another who would give you detention for not ruling a line straight enough

    Not all kids go home to sit and watch TV, some have real life problems, siblings to look after, ill parents, or after school jobs. Because of reasons like this, at least half a dozen girls dropped out of school at least a year before we should have left at 16 yrs old - as were put in no win situations by teachers

    I still stand by what I have seen over the years and say that some teachers only got into the profession so they can have authority over someone smaller, they are like failed bullies - Obviously not all of them, there are some lovely teachers also
    Blah blah blah.
    • coolcait
    • By coolcait 11th Oct 17, 12:32 AM
    • 4,125 Posts
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    coolcait
    Had it been me at school, that would have had you there until at least 6pm, possibly closer to 8pm, which would potentially be the earliest one of my parents could have got there to collect me, and you would have had to remain, because of duty of care. You would have prevented me from using the only method of transport available apart from a 12 mile walk, some of which was along unlit national speed limit single track roads with no pavement, so you personally would have become responsible for my safety.

    I came home on a school bus (45 minute journey) and arriving home at 4.45pm was always home before either parent. So mum would have had to wait for my brother, who went to a different school and got home later, then get in the car (if dad didn't have it, otherwise she might have been waiting to beyond 7pm for him to get back from doing overtime, which he had to do to pay the mortgage when the rate was ovver 15%) and drive another 45 minutes to the school to collect me. Then drive home, then cook dinner and when exactly homework would have got done is anyone's guess.

    I wondered what teachers thought about when handing out detentions like smarties. Certainly not how the child will get home once the school bus has gone, given that the reason the school bus existed was no public transport was available.
    Originally posted by onomatopoeia99
    That's certainly a lot to think about.

    Why shouldn't the student also think about it, and knuckle down to behaving well and doing his/her best?

    That would also avoid all of those difficulties for all of those people.
    • coolcait
    • By coolcait 11th Oct 17, 12:37 AM
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    coolcait
    I often used to wonder if teachers were living in the real world when handing out detentions. We used to have a teacher who would give you a detention for scraping your chair and another who would give you detention for not ruling a line straight enough

    Not all kids go home to sit and watch TV, some have real life problems, siblings to look after, ill parents, or after school jobs. Because of reasons like this, at least half a dozen girls dropped out of school at least a year before we should have left at 16 yrs old - as were put in no win situations by teachers

    I still stand by what I have seen over the years and say that some teachers only got into the profession so they can have authority over someone smaller, they are like failed bullies - Obviously not all of them, there are some lovely teachers also
    Originally posted by ska lover
    And how do you categorise all the pupils who not only couldn't be bothered for themselves - they were also disrupting the education of the other pupils who could be bothered? But weren't allowed to, because of the behaviour of their classmates.

    What about the parents who couldn't be bothered with their children or their education?

    Those groups also exist. What are your views on them?
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