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  • FIRST POST
    • potterspury
    • By potterspury 10th Oct 17, 8:55 AM
    • 40Posts
    • 2Thanks
    potterspury
    How do I find out if I am on the will?
    • #1
    • 10th Oct 17, 8:55 AM
    How do I find out if I am on the will? 10th Oct 17 at 8:55 AM
    Worked for a lady and she died recently.Is there anyway of finding out if I am on her will? She had no family and a friend was her next of kin, would this same person also be the executor and what does an executor do exactly?
Page 1
    • zx81
    • By zx81 10th Oct 17, 9:02 AM
    • 13,626 Posts
    • 14,080 Thanks
    zx81
    • #2
    • 10th Oct 17, 9:02 AM
    • #2
    • 10th Oct 17, 9:02 AM
    You'll be contacted if you're due to cash in.
    • Tom99
    • By Tom99 10th Oct 17, 9:12 AM
    • 213 Posts
    • 97 Thanks
    Tom99
    • #3
    • 10th Oct 17, 9:12 AM
    • #3
    • 10th Oct 17, 9:12 AM
    Once probate has been granted (if it is needed) you can download a copy of the will if there was one.
    • TonyMMM
    • By TonyMMM 10th Oct 17, 9:20 AM
    • 2,458 Posts
    • 2,616 Thanks
    TonyMMM
    • #4
    • 10th Oct 17, 9:20 AM
    • #4
    • 10th Oct 17, 9:20 AM
    You could get a copy of the death certificate and see who registered the death - where there is no family member that person may be the executor (but not always) ...you would have to ask them.
    • Margot123
    • By Margot123 10th Oct 17, 9:23 AM
    • 118 Posts
    • 72 Thanks
    Margot123
    • #5
    • 10th Oct 17, 9:23 AM
    • #5
    • 10th Oct 17, 9:23 AM
    Hopefully she thought you were wonderful and has left you a little something. Why not contact the friend? Or perhaps it might be a bit soon.........
    • konark
    • By konark 11th Oct 17, 1:02 AM
    • 888 Posts
    • 693 Thanks
    konark
    • #6
    • 11th Oct 17, 1:02 AM
    • #6
    • 11th Oct 17, 1:02 AM
    Who says there is a will?

    How can a friend be next of kin?

    Probably there is no will, no family and the Government will trouser the lot.
    • potterspury
    • By potterspury 11th Oct 17, 8:13 AM
    • 40 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    potterspury
    • #7
    • 11th Oct 17, 8:13 AM
    • #7
    • 11th Oct 17, 8:13 AM
    Once probate has been granted (if it is needed) you can download a copy of the will if there was one.
    Originally posted by Tom99
    Have you got the link I can go to to download it?
    • Margot123
    • By Margot123 11th Oct 17, 8:23 AM
    • 118 Posts
    • 72 Thanks
    Margot123
    • #8
    • 11th Oct 17, 8:23 AM
    • #8
    • 11th Oct 17, 8:23 AM
    As has previously been advised, Probate can take quite some time. That is assuming there was a need for Probate in the first place.
    Patience is a virtue, and even the impatient have to wait for news that may not be as good as they are expecting.
    • Tom99
    • By Tom99 11th Oct 17, 8:55 AM
    • 213 Posts
    • 97 Thanks
    Tom99
    • #9
    • 11th Oct 17, 8:55 AM
    • #9
    • 11th Oct 17, 8:55 AM
    Have you got the link I can go to to download it?
    Originally posted by potterspury
    https://www.gov.uk/search-will-probate


    Cost £10. Easy enough to search every so often. I thought at one time you could ask for an auto alert if an application was made in the future but I can't find that link now.
    • Tom99
    • By Tom99 11th Oct 17, 8:58 AM
    • 213 Posts
    • 97 Thanks
    Tom99
    Here is the standing search which will last 6 months.


    https://www.gov.uk/wills-probate-inheritance/searching-for-probate-records
    • potterspury
    • By potterspury 14th Oct 17, 8:34 AM
    • 40 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    potterspury
    It's all a bit of a weird situation. The old lady had no relatives who she saw much, she was befriended by someone for good reasons or to get her money ( I am not sure) for the last few years so it's a bit awkward to ask her because I dont know what she's been up to. The old lady was a but nuts and out of touch so who knows if the will was legit anyway. The friend who befriended her was her next of kin and had power of attorney.
    • Margot123
    • By Margot123 14th Oct 17, 12:32 PM
    • 118 Posts
    • 72 Thanks
    Margot123
    If there is a will, there's a good chance it will be contested by the distant relatives if, as you say, she was 'nuts' and left it to 'the friend'. OR maybe a donkey sanctuary will drop in lucky.
    • Jenniefour
    • By Jenniefour 14th Oct 17, 1:39 PM
    • 1,159 Posts
    • 1,134 Thanks
    Jenniefour
    If a will has been made relatively recently, then any decent solicitor will have made absolutely sure that the lady properly understood what she wanted and the will is legally watertight. Being a "bit nuts and out of touch" is not a good reason at all for a will being invalid, unless the solicitor was absolutely useless. Very rare.

    I'm a person of an age where I'm sure some people who know me would say I'm a bit nuts and out of touch sometimes, but as long as I can do things like recognise my own dog, name the prime minister, engage in a reasonably coherent conversation most of the time, and know the difference between night and day I doubt very much my capacity could be legally questioned.

    Don't assume that long lost and distant relatives, or those who didn't maintain much contact, might not inherit - they may do if there is no will, and, if there was a will, it may have been in their favour anyway. A friend of mine recently received a nice windfall from a relative, who had no children of his own, and who had divided his entire estate equally between all the children of his many siblings and cousins. Some beneficiaries knew him well and some had never met him more than a handful of times in their entire lives.

    There are also people who wouldn't even think of leaving something for someone who has worked for them, not because their services were not appreciated, but because they've already been paid for their work. And, of course, there are those who do remember someone in their will who has worked for them.

    Let's just hope the lady had a good nose for any potential gold diggers if there is a will. What is a pity is that there is still a lack of robust legislation to deal with abuse of the elderly who are particularly vulnerable to financial and other abuse, and are not in a position, or too frightened of the possible consequences, to do anything about it.
    • potterspury
    • By potterspury 17th Oct 17, 8:18 AM
    • 40 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    potterspury
    So basically. I need to wait for probate to have been done before I can see who's on the will. . I doubt I will get anything as I worked for her.

    I have been suspicious that the ladywho befriended her and took care of her, was her next of kin, power of attorney etc was hoping to get all the money. Fair dos I guess after the years of help and efforts she has put in to care for her. However, there's one conclusion I have come to, if her other definitely genuine friend who saw her every night isn't on the will then something fishy has gone on. Would I report it to social services before or after probate has been done?
    • elsien
    • By elsien 17th Oct 17, 8:22 AM
    • 15,154 Posts
    • 37,977 Thanks
    elsien
    Social services won't be in the slightest bit interested.
    If any relevant party wants to challenge the will, that's up to them, I'd keep out of it.
    You can't judge on appearances - friend of my mother left everything to the distant relatives who she rarely saw and called "the vultures". only a token amount to the two people who'd been paid helpers for years and nothing to friends. Her choice and she knew exactly what she was doing.
    Last edited by elsien; Yesterday at 8:26 AM.
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
    • Margot123
    • By Margot123 17th Oct 17, 8:33 AM
    • 118 Posts
    • 72 Thanks
    Margot123
    Social services won't be in the slightest bit interested.
    If any relevant party wants to challenge the will, that's up to them, I'd keep out of it.
    Originally posted by elsien
    If you are considering challenging the will (assuming there was one), how are you going to prove your evidence? You say the lady was 'nuts' but that is your opinion, it doesn't mean to say she lacked mental capacity at the time of making the will or any time after for that matter.
    There is nothing to stop a testator from leaving all their worldly goods to a cats home, even if they hated cats. A friend/relative could have cared for them day-in-day-out and would have very little basis for a challenge.
    Reading between the lines, I suspect you are hoping for a little windfall, and that if any one else gets the money/property you will be quite aggrieved.
    Be very careful if you want to challenge a will without firm evidence from doctors etc. You could end up with a very big legal bill (approx. £40,000 on average).
    Why not go to one of those free advice sessions local solicitors' often provide. I'm sure they will corroborate all that has been said on this thread.
    • jackyann
    • By jackyann 17th Oct 17, 9:09 AM
    • 3,158 Posts
    • 6,356 Thanks
    jackyann
    'Next of kin'has no legal standing.
    There is a hierarchy of relatives who inherit when someone dies intestate - you have find that on gov.uk.
    When agencies such as NHS, Social Services etc. ask for 'next of kin' they mean 'who do you want us to contact/ talk to about you?' and you can name anyone. It is quite common to name someone who isn't your nearest 'blood relative'.
    • Savvy_Sue
    • By Savvy_Sue 17th Oct 17, 9:13 AM
    • 37,733 Posts
    • 34,062 Thanks
    Savvy_Sue
    I doubt I will get anything as I worked for her.
    Originally posted by potterspury
    Indeed. Why would you? You worked for her, you were paid for what you did. End of.

    However, there's one conclusion I have come to, if her other definitely genuine friend who saw her every night isn't on the will then something fishy has gone on.
    Originally posted by potterspury
    Your conclusion is erroneous. Absolutely and completely erroneous.

    As others have pointed out, what people put in their wills is a) their own business; b) nothing to do with you and c) not always what you'd expect.
    Still knitting!
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    • potterspury
    • By potterspury 17th Oct 17, 9:14 AM
    • 40 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    potterspury
    No interest in getting involved £40,000 legal fees. The will in my opinion would be dodgy if her other friend wasn't on it. Shouldn't injustices be looked into? Was just going to ask social services if any doctoring of documents happened. Would email anonymously. Then get the hell out of there, let them deal with it. . The woman died two weeks ago so have no idea about Will. It doesn't come up on the link above yet as probate hasn't been completed I guess.

    The lady took control of her finances for years and was next of kin. Her husband is selling the bungalow when probate has been done.
    • potterspury
    • By potterspury 17th Oct 17, 9:20 AM
    • 40 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    potterspury
    Indeed. Why would you? You worked for her, you were paid for what you did. End of.

    Your conclusion is erroneous. Absolutely and completely erroneous.

    As others have pointed out, what people put in their wills is a) their own business; b) nothing to do with you and c) not always what you'd expect.
    Originally posted by Savvy_Sue
    Why erroneous? The other lady was her friend for even long longer. She didn't get involved in her life officially e.g. . Power of attorney etc
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