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  • FIRST POST
    • Infidel
    • By Infidel 9th Oct 17, 2:18 PM
    • 1,197Posts
    • 293Thanks
    Infidel
    Heating over 'winter'
    • #1
    • 9th Oct 17, 2:18 PM
    Heating over 'winter' 9th Oct 17 at 2:18 PM
    Hi.

    Finally it's time to set sail for sunnier climes and taking elderly relatives (for a perceived better quality of life). If all goes well we'll probably stay there for the whole winter . . so several months.

    Just a quick one regarding money saving and also possibly cold damage to a property.

    About the heating - at my relatives house - say best case scenario means we won't be be back until March time. What's the best thing to do about the heating?

    It's an old boiler and heating system. Certainly from the 70-80's at least. The heat system only allows the heat to be set to come on twice (and go off twice). [It's a Randall 3060 for those interested].

    Currently I've set the thermostat to 120 degrees (down from the ridiculously hot 170 it was set at) and set the heat to come on twice a day for 1hr (at midnight and at 5.30am).

    So what does one think. Is that okay? Or should I turn the thermostat down and possibly put the heat on for longer? Or maybe leave it off altogether?

    Obviously it's guess work as I have no idea what UK winter might be like, but at the same time I'm conscious of the bills adding up when not necessary.

    Thanks.
    Last edited by Infidel; 09-10-2017 at 2:20 PM.
    Instigated terrorism the road to dictatorship.
Page 1
    • cranford
    • By cranford 9th Oct 17, 3:10 PM
    • 67 Posts
    • 37 Thanks
    cranford
    • #2
    • 9th Oct 17, 3:10 PM
    • #2
    • 9th Oct 17, 3:10 PM
    Please take advice from the properties insurance company on what you can and cant do when you are leaving a property vacant for more than a few weeks. if you don't contact them your insurance could become invalid.
    • JJ Egan
    • By JJ Egan 9th Oct 17, 3:13 PM
    • 9,735 Posts
    • 3,996 Thanks
    JJ Egan
    • #3
    • 9th Oct 17, 3:13 PM
    • #3
    • 9th Oct 17, 3:13 PM
    As above its a bit many miss but have ticked the box saying property is occupied on the insurance sign up .
    • matelodave
    • By matelodave 9th Oct 17, 3:59 PM
    • 3,040 Posts
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    matelodave
    • #4
    • 9th Oct 17, 3:59 PM
    • #4
    • 9th Oct 17, 3:59 PM
    You may well find that the insurance requires someone to visit the propery on a regular basis especially if you are away for a prolonged period.

    Likewise they could require all water systems to be drained down - check your T&C's very carefully. I am assuming that the place is insured.
    Love makes the world go round - beer make it go round even faster
    • Ebe Scrooge
    • By Ebe Scrooge 9th Oct 17, 4:14 PM
    • 3,927 Posts
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    Ebe Scrooge
    • #5
    • 9th Oct 17, 4:14 PM
    • #5
    • 9th Oct 17, 4:14 PM

    Currently I've set the thermostat to 120 degrees
    Originally posted by Infidel

    Really ??? That's close on 50 degrees centigrade !!!


    OK, quite apart from the very valid - and important - points made already regarding insurance, the simplest thing is to turn the heating off, but make sure you get a frost-stat fitted if there isn't one already. Basically this will fire up the heating if the temperature drops below ( usually ) about 5 or 6 degrees.


    The alternative is to set the heating to come for a couple of hours at, say, 1:00 am ( likely the coldest part of the night ), at a temperature of about 15 degrees or so. That should keep the house warm enough to prevent any damage from freezing, and keep it warm enough throughout the day, without costing a fortune.


    Or else you can drain the whole system right down and turn off the water at the mains, then you shouldn't have to worry about burst pipes at all.
    Last edited by Ebe Scrooge; 09-10-2017 at 4:16 PM.
    I may not know much about art, but I know what I like.
    • matelodave
    • By matelodave 9th Oct 17, 4:19 PM
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    matelodave
    • #6
    • 9th Oct 17, 4:19 PM
    • #6
    • 9th Oct 17, 4:19 PM
    Actually the coldest part of of the night is around 0400-0600 just before dawn
    Love makes the world go round - beer make it go round even faster
    • footyguy
    • By footyguy 9th Oct 17, 5:07 PM
    • 3,679 Posts
    • 1,462 Thanks
    footyguy
    • #7
    • 9th Oct 17, 5:07 PM
    • #7
    • 9th Oct 17, 5:07 PM
    Please take advice from the properties insurance company on what you can and cant do when you are leaving a property vacant for more than a few weeks. if you don't contact them your insurance could become invalid.
    Originally posted by cranford
    +1

    I've had quite a few unoccupied property insurance policies over the years.

    (I'm sure it will be classed as unoccupied, as holiday breaks in usual (occupied) house cover is typically restricted to periods not exceeding 28 days)

    Typical requirements are from Oct-Mar inclusive, the heating is left on continuously 24/7 to maintain a room temperature of at least 12 degress C (sometimes as high as 15degrees C)
    Also, a requirement to prop open the loft hatch (if available) by at least 12" is not an uncommon term.

    Failure to do so would invalidate any claim for damage to the property by water loss.
    (alternatively, drain down completely all water systems to prevent such damage in the first place)

    Also, very common term is that the property must be inspected (internally & externally) at least once every 7 days (sometimes 14 days), attention given to any remedial action required, and log kept.
    Failure to do so may invalidate insurance cover

    This isn't intended as a full list of requirements, but an example of some of the typical requirements I see in almost all unoccupied house insurance policies.
    So do tell your insurer, and check you comply with the terms they impose.

    Last edited by footyguy; 09-10-2017 at 5:09 PM.
    • AndyPK
    • By AndyPK 9th Oct 17, 6:43 PM
    • 2,387 Posts
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    AndyPK
    • #8
    • 9th Oct 17, 6:43 PM
    • #8
    • 9th Oct 17, 6:43 PM
    I would set it to somewhere between 5 and 8°C

    You could just set the timer to ON and that would be the safest option.
    Shouldn't be any icing and thawing that causes burst pipes,
    and kinder to boiler.

    You could fit a frost stat of course.

    make sure you leave all the radiators on, (including upstairs)
    • colin79666
    • By colin79666 10th Oct 17, 5:37 PM
    • 1,298 Posts
    • 734 Thanks
    colin79666
    • #9
    • 10th Oct 17, 5:37 PM
    • #9
    • 10th Oct 17, 5:37 PM
    Maintain around 15 degrees to keep condensation/damp out of the equation and to keep insurers happy. That also gives a bit of wiggle room if the thermostat is wonky or we get a sudden cold snap and 2 hours a day heating isn't enough. As above a couple of hours in the small hours or an hour at 6am and another at 8pm should be enough unless it is a poorly insulated house.
    • AndyPK
    • By AndyPK 10th Oct 17, 6:22 PM
    • 2,387 Posts
    • 638 Thanks
    AndyPK
    setting it at 15°C is gonna costs loads £xxx
    • reeac
    • By reeac 11th Oct 17, 7:58 AM
    • 1,099 Posts
    • 437 Thanks
    reeac
    The OPs quoted temperatures of 120 and 170 are presumably boiler stat settings in Fahrenheit. I believe that this needs to be above a certain level (something like 150) in order to avoid excessive internal condensation and corrosion. Maybe the house has no roomstat (not that uncommon) in which case best to rely on judicious setting of the timer. Not easy to judge ...it would be advisable to get someone to look in once or twice a week.
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